Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Namerow

    Namerow

    Members


    • Points

      10

    • Posts

      1,303


  2. Seppi72

    Seppi72

    Members


    • Points

      5

    • Posts

      281


  3. jfa.series1

    jfa.series1

    Members


    • Points

      3

    • Posts

      2,447


  4. EScanlon

    EScanlon

    Members


    • Points

      3

    • Posts

      5,117


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/25/2006 in Articles

  1. There are a few threads floating around in the Topics section that deal with refreshing and/or upgrading the Z's Heater system. None of them offer much help for gaskets. Here, for the first time (I think) is a set of printable templates for the full set of gaskets that you'll need to put your 240Z Heater system back together in a factory-equivalent fashion. These templates were developed as part of the work I'm doing on my 1970 240. I know they're good for the 1970-71 cars, I think they're good for the 1972-73 cars, and I believe they might be ok for the 260Z as well. Restoring a 240Z Heater System (gasket templates included) I've debated for some time whether to attempt posting my experiences in restoring the heater system for my 70 Z -- there are already a couple of similar postings in the 240-260-280 Z Topics section on this site. However, none of them really has much to offer in the way of assistance for creating all of the (many) foam gaskets that are required to do the job properly. Since there's been some member interest expressed recently in getting access to templates for these gaskets, I've decided it's time to contribute my efforts as a new installation in the Articles section. I hope they save you some time and effort. Application My experiences (and the photos and templates posted here) come from the work I've been doing in restoring the Interior of my 70 Z. After looking at the Parts Fiche diagrams and part numbers for the 240Z's Heater system, I don't see any change in the main parts throughout the various 240 models (1969 - 1973) -- excepting the Heater Core/Matrix (same dimensions, but the orientation of the inlet/outlet pipes is a bit different). So: everything that appears here should be ok for your 240. If you're working on a 260Z or a 280Z, you'll need to verify whether the gasket shapes are the same or different (the Heater Box changed from an end-plate design to a centre-split design at some point along the way). And if you've got a 280ZX, all bets are off. My heater system was in the, 'rode hard, put away wet' condition when I pulled it out of the car and stripped it down. Fortunately, though, the corrosion was minimal and a pressure test of the heater core performed by my local rad shop showed that it was good to put back in the car (a relief, because the Series 1 heater cores are hard to find). Disassembly Pulling the assemblies apart is pretty self-explanatory. Just remember to take lots of photos and label-and-bag the parts (they look different when you come back to them after a week or two hiatus). Hopefully, your system (unlike mine) won't have shed any of its parts or suffered abuse at the hands of a PO. Heater Control Valve The most likely piece of the system to require replacement will be the Heater Control Valve. Mine was seized. However, a week-long soak in 'CLR' calcium-lime remover loosened things up very nicely. It doesn't appear to leak, either, but I still need to verify that with a proper pressure test. Leaks in this valve are usually down to the small rubber washer that seals around the in-out control rod. If your valve shows signs of leakage from this spot, I'm afraid that the only solution is to going to be the purchase of a complete new valve (pricey, but available from several sources). The little seal for the control rod used to be available from NAPA, but as of 2016 it appears to be NLA. Cleaning and Painting You can (and should) clean out all of the nooks and crannies with compressed air. Strip off all of the old gaskets and clean up the surfaces in preparation for installing new ones. One member has recently reported good experiences from using muriatic acid for this task. Be careful of eyes, skin, and breathing if you try this. And don't even think about doing it indoors or in your garage! (the vapours will corrode every bit of exposed steel in your shop - i.e. all of your tools, parts, and machines). Heater Box -- After you've removed any remaining crud and rust, I recommend painting the inside surfaces with a zinc-rich primer to help stave off any future corrosion. After you finish this job, I think you'll agree that you don't ever want to have to pull this unit out from under the dash again, so an anti-rust treatment makes sense. Make sure that the various airflow control flaps are operating freely and aren't bent. There are two big ones and two little ones. Remember to add a drop of oil to all of the hinges and pivots. When everything looks good mechanically, finish up by painting the outside of the main (metal) housings with a fresh coat of satin-finish black. Carefully mask off any decals before you apply the paint (I think there's just one). Re-Assembly & Gaskets Once again, this is pretty self-explanatory so most of my discussion here applies to the foam gaskets. The pictures here will help to remind you how everything goes back together. I made my gasket templates the hard way (drawn or traced by hand). Once done, I decided that I needed some insurance in case I made a mistake in cutting or during installation, so I tried scanning one of them into a .pdf file using my computer's scanner. A print-out afterwards proved that the .pdf file generated a new paper copy that was 100% accurate in size. That uncertainty removed, I scanned all the rest of the templates to generate a complete* set. The result was a set of digital templates that can be re-used ad infinitum. They're attached here. You can download the entire set, or just the ones you need for your particular job. Here's how to put them to use: Cutting and Applying Most of the gaskets used at the joins for the ducts and housings are very thin. I used 1/8" dressmaker's foam and it seemed to be about right in most cases (1/4" dressmaker's foam might offer a bit more resistance to tears, but it seemed too thick to me). This type of foam is open-cell and quite soft. I'm not sure about its long-term durability for automotive applications, but I suspect that it'll be good for at least five years. It's not easy to work with, though - stretchy and floppy while being handled and, of course, it has no adhesive. I came up with my own solution to this problem, but I've since become aware of a much better alternative! I recommend that you use the 1/16"-thick closed-cell foam that's sold at art supply shops in 8-1/2" x 11" sheets (visit your local Michael's or Joanne's store). This is available in one-sided adhesive form, with a strip-off paper backing sheet. All you need to do, then, is print off the gasket templates and then glue them onto the backing sheet. Presto! You're ready to start cutting. You'll probably need a soft foam for the gasket the seals between the windshield cowl panel and the 'Air Intake Compartment' housing. This gasket needs to be made from closed-cell foam in order to provide an effective water seal. While you can buy sheet neoprene in a 3/16" thickness and you might be able to use it here, I'd be concerned that it may be too hard (durometer) to provide enough compliance for this particular application. Whatever you use, you may need to consider using some kind of sealant for the gasket surface that seats against the cowl. Just make sure that the sealant and the foam that you use are compatible with one another. Do a trial application on a piece of foam scrap before you commit. Let is sit for a few days to see what happens. If you're in a hurry and not too worried about neatness, you can just use scissors to do most of the cutting of the gaskets. Just remember that not all scissors are created equal and a crappy pair of scissors will make for a poor job. I've had very good results using Olfa-brand scissors. If you want to do a tidier job with nice straight edges, though, you'll need to use a steel straight-edge and a razor knife. You'll still need the scissors for the contoured sections and the radiused inside and outside corners. Use a leather-type hole punch to create the bolts holes. This is a tedious but necessary part of the job. I've marked the hole centres and shapes in the templates. Here's a trick that I just learned (once again, after the fact) that will make things go faster and easier: For your backing board, don't use the flat side of a board ('face grain'). Instead, do your punching against the end grain (I used an end-cutting from a piece of pine 2 x 4 held in my bench vise). Punching into the end grain produces a cleaner hole in the foam and it takes a lot less pounding to get the job done Special Gaskets #1 - Heater Box End Plate Unfortunately, you're going to need to make your own template for these gaskets (there are two), because the ones I made were too big to fit on my computer scanner. They're relatively easy to make. Just tip the open end of the Heater Box onto a large sheet of tracing paper and use a pencil to make the outline. After you remove the box from the paper, you'll now need to draw cut lines for the inner and outer edges of the gasket. Do the outer cut line first. Draw it freehand so that it sits inboard of your traced line by about 1/16" - 3/64". Then draw the inner cut line (again, freehand) so that the width of the gasket is about ¼" all the way around. Note that the factory gasket was actually applied around the inside lip of the end plate's joining flange. Good luck trying to replicate that approach with your forty-year-old housing a cover plate. It's easy enough to cut the gasket strip and glue in in place. However, trying to slide the end plate over the end of the heater box without destroying the gasket is another matter altogether (and maybe that's why Nissan changed the Heater Box design later on so that it split down the center and got rid of the removable end plate). My approach was to make gaskets that would form a butt seal. Once cut, I glued these onto the main housing, rather than the end plate. This may not be quite as air-tight as the factory's lip-seal approach, but I think it's going to be pretty close. Feel free to try the lip-seal strategy if you like. Just remember to put on your hair shirt before you try to re-install the end plate. Special Gaskets #2 - Big Air Control Flaps There are two big air control flaps used in the system: the first is the fresh air/recirc control flap (located inside the 'Air Intake Compartment' housing, upstream of the Blower); the second is the vent/defrost control flap (located at the outlet of the Heater Box housing). Each one is operated by one of the control levers on the centre stack fascia. Each flap uses an over-centre, hairpin-type spring to create a 'toggle' action as the flap is moved from one setting to the other. Each of the flaps are finished with a padded-vinyl skin, applied to both sides of the flap. When the car was new, the flaps seated with a nice, reassuring 'thunk'. Unfortunately, after the system gets to be 30 or 40 years old, the padded-vinyl skin begins to deteriorate and peel off, changing the 'thunk' to a 'clang'. To re-create these vinyl-skinned flap liners, I recommend you use 1/4" dressmaker's foam (I ended up using two sheets of 1/8" foam glued together). Buy some thin upholstery vinyl while you're in the store (the flaps are invisible, so colour doesn't matter). Glue the vinyl to the foam (3M 80888 spray adhesive recommended) first, then cut the flap liners to shape. You need to be careful when positioning these liners, so that they seat properly around the entire periphery of the flange and don't foul the return spring that's located on one side. 'Align twice, glue once'. It's not terribly difficult to take the flap assembly apart. This will let you make a better/easier job of cleaning the flap surfaces and it will also let you clean and lube the shaft pivot surfaces. BTW, the little flaps that control the floor vents also have liners fitted. Again, they serve as both an air seal and a cushion (so that the flaps don't clang shut and then rattle and squeak). The foam to use in this location is either 1/8" open-cell foam or 1/16" closed-cell neoprene sheet. I used the former. These gaskets are hard to cut and hard to fit. They have to be cut in order to fit over the directional vanes, etc. and that makes them floppy and hard to handle. At the same time, they need to fit properly or else they won't seat against the adjoining flange on the Heater Box outlet. Special Gaskets #3 - Blower Motor-to-Blower Housing In this case, the gasket(s) function as both an air seal and as a vibration isolator. While the gasket as it came from the factory looks like it was cut as one piece, I found the areas around the three bolt holes to be too narrow to permit punching out the holes without severing the gasket. For that reason, I cut mine as three identical pieces, each representing one-third of the whole. I think it's a good enough seal. Because this gasket also has to provide a cushioning mounting surface for the Blower Motor/Impeller assembly, I used yet another type of foam for the purpose - in this case, it's 3/16" closed-cell, medium-density foam. My feeling is that the 3/16" neoprene sheet might, once again, be a bit too hard (durometer) for the application. My foam had one-sided adhesive with a strip-off protective sheet, so the three pieces were relatively easy to place and secure accurately. If your unit with like mine was, you'll need to replace the four rubber grommets that are used in the Motor/Impeller mounting plate. These are fitted as two pairs - one round pair and one oblong pair. They all have suitably shaped press-in metal liners. Accurate reproduction items are now available from a speciality supplier. The original grommets will probably be hard as a rock and won't be serving their purpose properly. None of the 'rubber softening' formulations that I've tried are even a tiny bit effective (I'd call them 'preservatives' rather than 'softeners'). The last picture here shows my completed Blower assembly. It's been retrofitted with a Honda Civic motor and impeller (more output, less noise, less current draw), complete with a customer-built duct to replicated the motor brush cooling system used on the original Honda setup. I've re-painted everything in satin black to make it look pretty. Now it just needs to have the Nissan wiring connectors added in place of the Honda items. I'm still toying with the idea of adding an 'intermittent' setting for the controls. Special Gaskets #4 - Centre Front Ventilator Duct Here's another place where the foam isn't actually acting as a gasket. In this case, the factory lined the inside surfaces of the metal duct outlet with thin, open-cell foam in order to reduce airflow noise. I can't say how well this actually works (you'd need to try 'with' and 'without' to really know). However, the set of templates includes the pieces needed to re-create this liner. It's finicky work to get this done right. You'll need to use 1/8" dressmaker's (open-cell) foam for it to work (the closed-cell neoprene foam won't offer any quietening effect). Excessive gaps or steps between the foam pieces make un-do the intended purpose of the lining, so you need to be careful here. Also, poor cutting or gluing could cause the foam to foul the rotating, chromed directional-vane piece. Special Gaskets #5 - Heater Core Pads Most of these aren't really gaskets, of course. They're pads glued to the heater core to keep it from generating squeaks and rattles after it's slid into position inside the Heater Box. There are end pads applied to both the left and right header tanks. The factory put a long central pad along the centre part of the left (driver's side) header tank. I don't think it's necessary because the header tank is indented there and there's no potential for metal-to-metal content. I just used the little pads located at either end of the tank. I glued these to the wall of the Heater Box, rather than gluing them to the header tank. There are also vinyl skinned pads that act as sleeves around the Heater core's supply and return pipes. These actually do function as gaskets, hence the vinyl skin (which acts as a seal against the removable end plate of the Heater Box). In all cases here, the factory used soft, open-cell foam. The re-create this, I found some inexpensive kitchen sponges purchased from the local Dollar Store that were about right. These had to be cut to shape. I marked off the cut lines with a pen and then used a hooked razor knife to make the cuts. The vinyl skin for the supply/return line sleeves is best glued to the foam after you've done your cutting (the thick foam squirms a lot when it's being cut, and it's hard to cleanly cut through both the thick foam and the vinyl in one shot). I did, however, make the holes after the vinyl had been glued in place. I didn't have a ready-made leather punch big enough to make these rather large holes, so I made one from a lamp fixture found in my odds-and-ends drawer (the cutting edge was made with a file after I'd chucked the piece into my drill press). Here's a place where my new-found knowledge about punching into the end grain of the wood backing piece would have made for a better and easier job (notice the blunt impressions made in the wood after pounding against the face grain). General Suggestions Depending on how much wastage you can tolerate, it will be more economical if you nest the gasket templates into groups, so as to make maximum use of each 8-1/2 x 11" sheet of neoprene. See photos for illustrations of how I did this. I've found that this closed-cell neoprene responds remarkably well to cyanoacrylate glue ('super glue'). The big gaskets for the Heater Box End Plate can are too big to be cut as single pieces from an 8-1/2 x 11" sheet, so they have to each be made from 2 pieces joined together. You can - if you want - glue the pieces together with butt joins before installing as a single piece on the housing. Or, you can just glue them in place one after the other (easier). Try to keep the gaps at the cut ends as small as possible. As I mentioned at the outset, this is a long and tedious job. The picture of the mess I had left behind tells part of the story. Having my templates available will certainly remove a lot of the challenges. For the locations where all that's needed is a joint seal, you can - arguably - get the same functional result by just using adhesive-backed foam strip purchased in a roll from the hardware store. You could even try using silicone caulking as a replacement for cut-foam gaskets. Neither of these approaches will help you for the flaps, the acoustic lining, and the Heater Core pads and sleeves. You'll have to decide what works best to meet your personal objectives for your project. Namerow Burlington, Ontario May 2016
    7 points
  2. I decided to add a Vintage Air mini system to my S30 restomod build. The intended engine is an L28 stroker. The engine is currently on a stand. While many Classic Zcar posts have discussed various aspects of installing an A/C system into an S30 chassis, none, to my knowledge, have ever given details regarding the fabrication of a bracket to fit on the lower front left side of an L6 engine and hold a Sanden compressor in the proper orientation. This post is intended to rectify that information void. The most detailed post that I could find on Classic Zcar was created by Freez74 (Gary) in December, 2020 and I consulted him on a few matters before I started my fabrication efforts. Both Gary and I started with the universal Sanden compressor mounting brackets available from Vintage Air. He got his from Summit Racing in Talmadge, Ohio. I bought mine from JEGS for $45 as I live close by to its HQ in Delaware, Ohio and can easily get to its retail store in Columbus. So, I can save on shipping costs. Hooray for me. As you can see, the brackets have a nice shape to them and appear to offer a lot of adjustability for keeping the drive belt tight. The brackets are laser cut from ¼-inch steel and there’s a lot of metal at the tail end to play with so as to get proper distancing of the compressor both from the engine and from the surrounding bay walls and other bits like the steering rack. Gary said he used 3/16” steel plate to make his base plate to which he welded his brackets after cutting off a sufficient amount of excess steel. He said that the steel base plate flexed a little but that probably isn’t a big issue as it’s firmly bolted to the block. He also decided to have his brackets go underneath the compressor. This approach places the compressor higher up along the block and, because of this, it is close to the intake and exhaust manifolds. This necessitated he orient the compressor so that its intake and outlet ports are in a horizontal position. I decided to reverse the bracket orientation so that the compressor ports could be in a more vertical orientation and the adjusting slot on the rear bracket was in an easily accessible position on top. I had a problem, however: the engine is not in the car, it’s on a stand. Thus, I had to figure out how much metal to cut off the brackets so that the compressor would clear the left frame rail in the engine bay as well as the intake and exhaust manifolds to not present problems with hooking up the E-Z Clip fittings that I decided to use for my A/C system. Here’s what I did. First, I had to decide how big a base plate I needed to have. Gary did not have any dimensions that he could solidly recall so I was on my own for that, although he did tell me that his plate was about 7-1/4” by 5-1/2”. In looking at the mounting locations on the engine block, I decided that starting with a 6”x7” plate would be appropriate. I got some scrap ¼” steel from a local steel fabrication shop and used a horizontal band saw to cut it to shape. I then had to decide where to put the holes for the M10-1.5 bolts that go into the block. Gary said he traced the block holes on paper and then transferred the locations to his base plate. I was able to easily measure the hole distances. But I also had to decide how far forward to place the base plate. What to do? What to do? I decided to mock up both the base place and the brackets using some old political yard sign stock – the kind that’s made from a corrugated plastic. Fairly quickly, I determined that a good placement had the rear bolt holes ½” from the rear edge of the base plate. I also determined that the topmost holes were fine at ½” from the top edge of the plate. From eyeballing the mockup position compared to the crank pulley, this gave me plenty of space at the front of the plate on which to locate the front bracket. I drilled 27/64” holes (10.72 mm) at my four locations. Because they were larger than what was absolutely necessary for the 10 mm bolts, this would give me the “slop” I might need to get things aligned. Below are the dimensions that I used. Sorry about the tilted arrows – Word is not the best thing for making graphics. I have since determined that the 6” base plate dimension could just as easily be 5-1/4” so take your choice. I’ll probably cut my plate down now that I know. And here is what it looked like in real life. Now that I had the base plate drilled, it was time to determine how much metal to cut off the bracket tails. Here is where making mockups became very important. I made several mockups of the brackets as received. Using an adjustable-height chair and some wedges, I was able to support the compressor bolted to the mockup brackets and hold it in position next to the engine on the base plate. I had previously attached an engine cross-member to the block and tilted it the requisite 12 degrees so the X-member was horizontal and level. I could then visualize where the frame rail would be located. After a few iterations, I determined where to make my cuts. I chose to cut a diagonal line with an end point 4” in from the tail edge on the “long” side of the bracket and 3” in from that same edge on the “short” side. You can see the line marked in the picture above. The position of the compressor with this revised bracket is shown below. Note how the two ports are almost vertical and I still have room to adjust the drive belt tension. Looking at it from directly above, you can see there is adequate clearance from the imaginary frame rail where its inner wall would be along the yellow line that I’ve drawn on the photo where the engine pylon rises from the X-member. So, with that settled, the brackets were cut and the whole assembly once again test fitted. Now Now came determining the actual location of the brackets on the base plate. I aligned the grooves of the single-groove crank pulley, the water pump pulley and the rearmost groove on the compressor drive pulley to arrive at this positioning. I should mention that I have a dual groove crank pulley that will be used in the final installation and its grooves align with the double grooves on the compressor. See the final photo in the article. The front grooves of each pulley will be used to drive the compressor. The distance from the leading edge of the base plate to the front wall of the forward bracket is 3/8” (about 10 mm). I marked the location and welded the bracket into place. The compressor itself then dictated the location of the rear bracket. Finishing up the welds gave me my final piece. I’ll dress it up and paint it so that my under-developed welding skills will be less evident; i.e., embarrassing, and I’ll be ready for next year’s warm weather. I hope this article will be of some assistance to folks who will want to install a Sanden compressor. As a retired research scientist, I know that we stand on the work of those who came before us and hope to provide a good base for those who come after us. I am happy to have a conversation with anyone about my installation.
    3 points
  3. 1976 280Z Combination Switch Teardown Problems to be remedied: 1) The turn signal self – canceling pawls won’t return by their own spring force; 2) The turn signal lever is slow to return from the R or L position after being released; 3) The selector detents (headlights, signals, wipers) feel sticky and imprecise; and 4) Headlight and turn signal switch contact resistance is high and inconsistent. In addition to needing these repairs, I was concerned about the integrity of wire harness connectors, solder joints, switch contacts and springs, and wire insulation and wanted to perform a thorough inspection. Pic 1 Pic 2 The teardown included every removable component as well as disassembly of the switches. I passed on taking apart the headlight high/low push-button type switch though. All the other switches were taken apart by either bending up the tabs on the metal back cases or removing screws to release the internal components. The high/low switch is a snap-together type and I did not want to risk breaking the plastic housing or the phenolic board that snaps into it. The disassembly process for everything else is very straightforward – as everything is secured with phillips head screws. After disassembly, all the mechanical parts were cleaned in mineral spirits which very quickly dissolved the hardened grease and oil but not enough to obviate needing a toothbrush. After drying, a careful application of fresh grease and oil, where appropriate, made everything work like it should. Switch Identification Pic 3 Pic 4 Pic 5 TEARDOWN Take care to keep the springs with the bits they belong to. Although most appear to be the same, there are differences in diameter and spring rate. Separate the two halves of the assembly and disconnect the bullet connector that electrically links the two halves: Pic 6 Remove the screws securing the wire right side wire retainer. Note the retainer passes between the washer pump wires: Pic 7 Reassembly Note: The left side wire retainer goes to the bottom notch. The top notch is just visible in the extreme lower left corner: Pic 8 Remove the (3) headlight switch screws. Doing so will release one washer pump contact. As you lift the switch, keep track of the (2) spring-loaded plungers beneath it and the nylon shoulder washer that insulates the washer pump contact from the screw securing it (Pic 10): Pic 9 Pic 10 Remove the (3) screws from the wiper speed switch. Doing so will release the other washer pump contact with its shoulder washer. Remove the sliding contact and spring, as well as the black detent pin and spring: Pic 11 Pic 12 Pic 13 Pic 14 Remove the (1) screw holding the washer pump contacts and (2) pieces of plastic that sandwich them: Pic 15 Pic 16 If you do not intend to disassemble the hi/lo switch, the wire retainer for that switch and the turn signal switch can remain attached to the wiring on that side. Remove the (2) screws holding the turn signal switch and the (2) screws holding the high/low switch: Pic 17 Remove the (1) screw holding the horn contact to its white plastic base, then remove the (4) screws for the self-cancel mechanism. Note that both pawls are out of position: Pic 18 It isn’t absolutely necessary to disassemble the right hand stalk (with the headlight, wiper, and washer switch controls) in order to deal with the problems described at the top of this thread. That said, let’s dig in. Remove the washer pump actuator rod by depressing the washer pump button and disengaging the white plastic retainer from the head of the rod. The rod will easily slide out. The plastic bushing on the small end may fall off the rod when it’s withdrawn from the stalk. They appear to serve to keep the rod centered in the bore: Pic 19 Pic 20 Pic 21 Remove the white plastic wiper switch actuator arm (friction fit on shaft) (in the background), and then the retaining ring beneath it that secures the headlight switch actuator arm: Pic 22 At the opposite of the stalk, remove controls by removing the retaining ring: Pic 23 Pic 24 Slide the black sleeve off the shaft to expose the c-clip: Pic 25 Pic 26 On the left side assembly, after removing the self-cancel mechanism, remove the torsion spring. Then, on the reverse side, remove the retaining ring to free the turn signal actuator block, and then the sliding white plastic block. Once removed the detent balls and springs can be extracted (take care to catch them as you pull out the actuator block): Pic 27 Pic 28 Pic 29 Unfortunately, the pin that retains the turn signal lever is swaged on the end opposite the round head. The only way to remove it is to cut if off or try to make it round enough to get through the hole in the block, which is what I did. I figured I’d just make a new one on the lathe. The problem of course is how to swage the end again so it’s flat. Pic 30 The block, which appears to be a zinc die-cast type part, holds the upper pivot and spring post, which is a brass serrated pin, by means of swaging the zinc shoulders around it. This one is very loose, but there is no damage. It’s just the zinc deforming over time from the barrel of the torsion spring bearing against it. There is very little zinc base area below this pin and less above it (to clamp it in place). I could see no good way to reinforce or otherwise add something to improve the retention force, so I used a socket that fit well and put it on the press – gently. The brass pin tightened right up, but I doubt it will stay that way long. I really wanted to silver solder it or something, but fear of catastrophic failure made me think otherwise. Pic 31 Pic 32 Pic 33 While it’s all apart, it’d be a good time to repaint the lever and polish out small scratches in the plastic knob (wet sanding with 400, 600, and up worked well). SWITCH DISASSEMBLY Wiper Speed Switch Remove the (3) screws to expose the contacts. Be very careful with the thin phenolic spacer. Its thickness matches that of the fixed contacts and prevents the sliding contact from getting hung up on the edges: Pic 34 I did not remove this rivet to gain access to the wiper motor contacts, as I had no way to safely replace it: Pic 35 Headlight Switch Bend up the tabs on the metal case to release the phenolic contact board. Do not straighten them, just move them enough to free the board. Every time the metal bends it work hardens. When you reassemble the switch, the tabs will not want to bend back exactly the way they were. Also, should it be necessary to open the switch again, the tabs could break from being hardened. Note the evidence of contact arcing inside the case: Pic 36 Pic 37 Pic 38 Pic 39 The contacts have suffered some pretty good erosion and cannot be easily repaired. My solution was to simply reverse them from one side of the switch plate to the other to permit the untouched ends to make with the posts on the board. It might also be wise to consider adding a pair of arc-suppression diodes to this circuit (and perhaps to all the contact sets showing similar evidence of arcing): Pic 40 Pic 41 Pic 42 Turn Signal Switch Same process as for the headlight switch. Bend up (3) tabs. Inside the case is a actuator plunger and spring, and a moveable contact. Contact erosion was minimal and they were freshened up quickly: Pic 43 Pic 44 High/Low Headlight Switch Because this switch is assembled by snapping the contact board into recesses in the switch housing, I decided not to attempt disassembly out of concern for either part breaking. If it ever fails, then I have nothing to lose by attempting a repair: Pic 45 Pic 46 Reassembly Notes As mentioned above, overworking the tabs can cause problems. The first pic is what you might get if you are not careful with re-bending the tabs. Notice how the contact board does not sit flush to the outside of the case. It’s because the tabs do not easily bend where they originally did and are now bending lower, toward the case. The remedy is to gently work the tabs so they are not pushing sideways against the board. The second pic is after tuning them: Pic 47 Pic 48 The washer pump contacts are held in place sandwiched between two white plastic parts, the one shown below in Pic 45 and the one shown in Pic 16. The bosses indicated by red arrows below mate with matching female recesses in the other part. Pic 49 If you have any plastic bits showing some distress, consider setting the retaining screw(s) gently and applying some blue Loctite, as opposed to cranking down on them which could invite a bigger problem. Pic 50
    3 points
  4. Written in January 2020 This little mini-article documents the repairs that I made to my 70 Z's ashtray. Pictures follow at the end. Like many of these ashtrays, the hinge pieces had failed, causing the lid to come adrift. The ashtray isn't much good in that shape. In fact, it doesn't even look good cosmetically. If this is the case for your ashtray, your options are pretty straightforward: Repair or Replace. I think most owners take the 'replace' route, but NOS ashtrays are pretty $pendy (US$1,200 new or $1,000 refurbished from JDM-Car-Parts.com, as of January 2020)). If you don't have the budget, you do what you have to do. No one wants a gaping hole in the console of their otherwise-perfect Series 1 interior. I chose the 'repair' strategy partly because I was trying to keep my project budget under control, but equally because I get a lot of satisfaction out of restoring things. Before I discuss the details of what I did, I think it would be worthwhile to briefly discuss why these ashtrays fail in the first place. There seem to be a few culprits at work: The little helical spring is too strong. This not only overloads the plastic hinge bosses as the lid opens and closes, but also creates an high shock load in those parts when the lid is allowed to snap open (as is usually the case). The type of plastic used to create the main ashtray molding is really brittle (it seems like a 'bakelite'-type material, presumably chosen for its ability to withstand cigarette and cigar burns). That means that it's extra susceptible to stress cracking where high loads exist -- and that seems to describe the situation for the loads that the molded-in bosses take from the tray lid's hinge pins. The tray lid's pivot arms (or 'ears') are molded with sharp interior angles where they meet the underside of the lid. More stress risers. More cracking. In the case of my ashtray, all three problems were on display. 1) The hinge-pin bosses were cracked on one side. On the other side, the top of the boss was missing altogether. As an added nuisance factor, a PO had attempted to repair the one of the bosses using what appeared to be contact cement (now there's an optimist!). 2) The tray lid's RHS pivot arm had snapped off at its root. 3) Both of the threaded hinge pins were missing. These are parts that don't show up on eBay. In fact, I couldn't even find a picture to let me know what they looked like. All I knew was that they threaded into the bosses (presumably to allow the lid to be assembled to the tray). Replacement Spring The little hairpin spring has a required 'relaxed' configuration to make it operate with the right over-centre action when the lid reaches the half-open position in its travel. Too much tension and the lid will slam against its stops (see above). Too little tension and the lid action will feel 'floppy'. Also, there are little 90-degree tangs at the ends of the arms that fit into holes in the tray wall and the lid arm. I didn't expect to find anything suitable in my little box of oddball springs. I also didn't expect to see a replacement OE spring up for sale on eBay. And it isn't exactly an over-the-counter item you can order from a hardware jobber. The only way forward was to make my own. This isn't as hard as it sounds. Regular, untempered steel wire works fine for little springs like this. With limited travel, the spring material never gets taken past its elastic limit, meaning that it never takes a stretched set and always stays 'springy' (note: in cases where the required extent travel is more extreme, it's easy to put a bit of temper into the spring after you've formed it by heating it red-hot with a torch and then quenching it in an oil bath). As mentioned earlier, evidence suggests that the Nissan OE spring is too strong (tempered wire, and also too thick), so there was no point in trying to slavishly copy that part of its design. After some trial and error, I ended up using 0.044" wire (that's a bit under 1/16" and roughly equates to AWG 18 or ~ 1mm). I wanted my new spring to have about the same coil diameter as the OE spring -- that is, an OD of ~ 3/8" or 14mm. As a forming mandrel, a 1/4" drill bit looked about right. I clamped the bit in my bench vise so that the shank (smooth part) projected horizontally out one side of the jaws. Then, holding a 12" length of wire in my hands, I wrapped a double* coil around the drill shank and then examined the relaxed shape. The legs had to form a 90-degree angle a. The coil had to have a reasonably accurate OD and have a tight 'stack'. It took several tries to get this to come out right, but in the end I was happy with my result. (* My first try duplicated the OE spring by having only a single-wrap coil, but it was too stiff -- I eventually found that a double coil worked better.) Now it was time to bend the tangs onto the ends of wire extending from the freshly formed coil. This easily done in your bench vise, but first you need to know how long to make the legs. It turns out that this doesn't have to be precise. In my case, I made the bend point for the tangs so that the finished length of each leg was 1/2" (measured along the leg, from the tang back to the point where the leg starts as a tangent off of the coil). Make sure that you bend the tangs in the right direction (they should both point outboard relative to the spring coil's centreline). Otherwise, you get to start all over again. Once you form the bends for the tangs, you complete the spring by snipping the excess wire off each tang. The tangs should be at least 1/8" long. Replacement Hinge Pins With the OE pins MIA, I had to make my own. I started with a pan-head 1/8" machine screw, about 1" long. I chucked about 1/2" of the threaded length in my drill press and then used a mill file to reduced the OD of the screw head to about ~ 1/8". With the screw still mounted in the drill press, I then used the file to take the height of the screw head down to ~ 1/8". I now had a cylindrical screw head with a flat top, but with very little slot depth left to accept a screwdriver. I now clamped the screw in my bench vise (using plastic jaw inserts to protect the screw thread) with the screw head sticking out and used a thin hacksaw blade to deepen the slot. Then I reversed the orientation of the screw in the vise jaws so that I could cut off the excess threaded length. The finished length of the resulting hinge pin needs to be ~ 5/8". Get these too long and the heads will stick out of the side of the tray too much and you won't be able to insert the tray into the receiver hole in the console . Get them too short and the pins won't project far enough into the tray to engage the lid's pivot arms. Repairs to the Lid 'Ear' As noted earlier, the ear on one side of the lid (RHS) was had snapped off. I wasn't overly optimistic about just gluing it back in place. It was going to need some structural reinforcement. To achieve this, I marked and drilled 2 sets of opposing 1/16" diameter holes in the ear and the underside of the lid. Short plastic pins were then cut to length and glued in place as part of the overall joining of the ear to the lid. Since the time when I did this repair, Steve Nix at 240Zrubberparts.com has begun offering a replacement lid*. That's probably a safer route to take (January 2020 price is US$100 plus shipping), but my results show that with a little attention to detail these lids can be repaired successfully. (* To the best of my knowledge, no one at this time is offering a replacement tray (tub) as a standalone item. Nor am I aware of any sources for the threaded hinge pins and the little hairpin spring.) Repairs to the Hinge Pin Mounting Bosses As noted earlier, the boss on one side (LHS) was intact but cracked. On the other side, the top of the boss was missing. Although I've always been suspicious of the ability of epoxy-type glues to take much in the way of side loads, they've improved over the years (the JB Weld product lineup is impressive) and I decided to give it a try. Of course, each repair needed to include a threaded hole for the pivot pins. I didn't like my chances for drilling and tapping in epoxy, so I instead did the epoxy repairs with the lid and the pivot pins (but not the spring) in place. The idea was to let the epoxy flow around the pins and their threads. To keep the pins from being glued stationary, I wrapped them with a turn-and-a-half of plumber's teflon tape. After the glue set up, I was pleased to find that - with a little careful coaxing - the pins could be freed up and then screwed in and out within their new epoxy-reinforced homes. That allowed me to adjust the slop out of lid mounting. Installing the New Spring This was a little fiddly. The tray lid needs to be slid over to the right to get enough space to fit the spring tab into the its hole in the lid ear. Then the tab on the other leg of the spring needs to be inserted into its hole in the wall of the tray. This means putting some tension on the spring while also guarding against letting the sharp end of the spring tab scratch the inside wall of the tray. Just takes patience. End Results Unfortunately, I didn't take any in-progress pictures while I was doing these repairs. Hopefully, the finished-result pictures below will provide adequate details. As I write this, the repair was actually done four years ago. I'm pleased to report that all of the epoxy repairs have held up well and the lid still flips open and shut very nicely. The work took me a couple of workshop days and let me direct over $1,000 towards other costs and purchases. If I had the job to do again, I would add a pair of soft-rubber snubbers to the places where the front edge of the lid contacts the inside walls of the tray when it snaps open. I think this is where the parts experience undesirable shock loads and it would be really nice to damp them out. I may just try to insert a couple of strips of adhesive-backed sponge-neoprene sheet in there to make that happen (wish I'd thought of this before I final-assembled the ashtray).
    3 points
  5. I found myself in need of a power antenna to bench-test a couple of OE radios with antenna switches. I bought one of the aftermarket antennas only to find they are designed for aftermarket radios with the antenna power functions tied to the on-off switch. At least the return was painless! Back to ebay and I located an OE antenna in need of a mast but having a working motor, this antenna had the stub of the first section buried in the mast housing. Next up was locating a replacement mast and again back to ebay. I had previously spotted this unit and filed it away for future reference. Critical specification: the diameter of the first section is the same as an OE mast. Another ebay purchase. https://www.ebay.com/i/133096384270?_trksid=p1.c100419.m3735&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20150526101553%26meid%3D2741aa68453a4b388f4c05c18c433b53%26pid%3D100419%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D4%26b%3D1%26sd%3D182853988467%26itm%3D133096384270%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D1&ul_noapp=true Switching out the cable is pretty straightforward: open the cable spool and remove the cotter key holding the ferrule in place, strip out the old cable, Next, heat the ferrule to get it off the old cable and heat it again to install it on the new cable. While in here, disassemble the spool to clean and lube the clutch. When reassembling, check the clutch tension by hand to ensure it will easily release. The clutch on my unit was so tight it would never slip! Also lube the drive screw. At only 10” long when compressed, this antenna mast is designed to drop flush into a fender, not protrude like on our Z’s. Even though I only intend to use this one for bench-testing, I still wanted to determine what it would take to make it resemble the OE style. Clearly a spacer was called for to hold the mast higher in the housing. I took some measurements from my car and cut a section off the leftover mast tube about 40mm long. Next I added the spacer to the cable and reassembled the unit. Finally, I borrowed the finisher nut from my car to check how the finished product might look if installed on a Z and ran it through its extend/retract paces. Everything runs super smooth and looks pretty good. For anyone needing a replacement mast and not overly concerned about an OE look, this can be a workable solution.
    3 points
  6. CREDITS: This article was initially written by Enrique Scanlon in 2004. With his help, Bob Kroshefsky (Seppi72) revised it in 2011 while working on his own car. You can perform troubleshooting with the door on or off the car. Various parts and sources are listed at the end. Window movement problems can be caused by: a bent regulator arm, a bent or misaligned front or rear guide, a sticking or broken roller, a stripped handle or a damaged regulator gear. You will first have to remove the interior door finisher panel to expose the door innards. The picture below shows all the parts discussed in this article laid out in their approximate positions. Remove the door window regulator assembly (below). That's the gear and lever mechanism operated by the window crank. This will allow you to both inspect it easily and manipulate the window within the door without this assembly getting in the way. Check the main door sash – the stainless steel (SS) window frame. Is it straight? There is a gentle inward curve to it that allows the glass, which isn't flat itself, to slide up and down inside of it. But other than the gentle curve, is the sash itself straight, i.e., no twists, kinks, dings, or anything that would stop the glass from going up and down? The felted gasket inside the main door sash should have a uniform profile of constant width. If the gasket has lost a lot of its felt lining, it will act just like solid rubber on the glass, preventing the window from moving up and down smoothly. I don’t know of a way to restore these so you’ll have to replace them. One other thing: the Datsun parts microfiche indicates there is a second felted gasket for the lower rear sash. In all the S30 doors I have taken apart over the years, I’ve never seen this piece and I’m not sure how useful it might actually be, although I know that the lower rear corner of the glass rides in this part of the sash channel. Regardless, the part is listed at the end of this article. Slide the window glass up and down inside the main door sash. You should be able to determine if the window will go up and down smoothly and effortlessly (considering the weight of the glass pane). If it passes this test, then you know that the sashes and guides are set up properly and the glass gaskets are OK. If, on the other hand, you find that the window sticks either on the way down or on the way up, address the problem. Is the door glass bumper pressing on the window pane properly? This is the little, barrel-shaped roller that guides the pane into the upper part of the door sash. There should be one of these near the front of the door and, as an option, a second one near the back. There are cutouts on the inside of the exterior door sheet metal where these bumpers need to go. They sit underneath the SS/rubber exterior trim piece. The metal portion is formed of spring steel and is highly susceptible to both corrosion and fatigue breakage at the various bends put into the part. The bumper is required to push the glass inward at the bottom of its travel. The interior door finisher panel’s fuzzy weatherstrip pushes the window outwards. Between these two, along with the main sash and the front guide, the glass is maintained in the middle of the imaginary window channel surface and the glass operates nicely. Check the front glass guide that’s bolted to the inner door panel sheet metal. The nylon slide mounted on the front of the glass support frame rides in this channel. Is the slide moving smoothly? Will lubrication take care of it? The guide has a gentle curve to it like the main door sash, but the channel itself should not have any noticeable bends in it. If it does, it must be repaired or replaced. This is more than likely the source of any operating problem. Check the regulator arms (the scissors) to see if they're straight. Only one has a bend to it and it is noticeable and obviously intentional. Next, check the regulator pinion gear (that the crank handle actuates) and the toothed spline arm. If any teeth are missing or bent, this will cause a hitch in movement. If it’s the pinion gear, problems will be cyclical. If it’s the stamped metal spline, a problem will only occur once as the window operates. Is the toothed portion of the spline arm flat and making proper contact on the pinion gear? There should be a coil spring on the regulator assembly. It's there to exert force upwards on the glass to counter its weight. If it's unanchored, broken or missing then raising the glass is going to be extremely difficult. The sheer weight of the pane is too much for the gearing in the regulator and the pinion gear will work its way out of the spline arm teeth. Check the roller wheels on the regulator arms. Two of them act directly on the window pane itself and the third fits in the rear regulator guide that is bolted to the inner sheet metal panel of the door. Each of these wheels MUST roll easily. What I mean is that they don't spin freely, but will spin with a little force. If they aren't moving easily, then you must clean them out and free them up; perhaps adding some sort of lubricant. Make sure they operate without wobbling on their axles. If they have a lot of wobble, they will probably jam as you exert force on the wheel through that axle. If these rollers are broken, tight or otherwise NOT functioning properly, because they are at the end of long arms, the problem gets magnified. The rollers are nylon and can easily become grooved or damaged. If that's the case, the only way to fix this is to get a new window regulator assembly as the pins that hold the rollers to the scissor levers are peened into the lever arm. If the roller wheels check out OK, are the two guide channels on the glass support frame (the metal attached to the glass itself) straight and unbent or undamaged? These channels are what the door window regulator assembly wheels ride in and exert the force to raise and lower the glass. If there are kinks, gunk or other obstructions, they will cause you problems. They must be uniform in channel width; that is, the width that the roller "sees" as it rolls back and forth. As you look down the channel from the end, it should be smooth and straight. Check for old grease residue. Old grease eventually gets to be the consistency of tar and makes it VERY difficult to move items through it. BTW, the only places for grease on the window assembly are on (1) the front glass guide, where the glass support frame’s nylon slide goes, (2) the regulator gear/spline contact area, (3) the swivel point for the regulator arms, (4) the two channels on the glass support frame and, (5) the rear regulator guide. Other than that, no grease, oil or other lubricant is needed. You should NEVER apply grease anywhere in the main door sash. Grease here will just get all over your arm or shirt sleeve. And, God help you if that happens to your wife or girlfriend. The adjustment for the window is straightforward. You have to have the door glass bumper(s) installed or it will be a royal PITA. The interior weatherstrip on the door finisher panel, presses against the glass to push it out. If it's missing or caked solid with dirt, grease or gunk, it will just impede the sliding of the pane. The fuzzy rubber gasket on the exterior SS trim piece seals the door innards from rain once the window is closed. The bumper locates the glass in the center of the main door sash. 1. If off the car, make sure that the door panel is vertical. 2. Loosen the installation nuts for the front door sash and the rear regulator guide. 3. Roll the window up and down and check the alignment of the rear edge of the glass with the main door sash. 4. If the glass tilts too far to the rear, move the rear regulator guide upward. If it tilts too far to the front, move the guide downward. As a general rule, the guide nuts will both be at the same location respective to each other within their slotted holes; i.e., the front nut won't be higher or lower than the rear nut in the inner door panel slots. 5. When the glass is parallel with the main door sash, adjust the front glass guide so it is parallel with the front edge of the window. You can just look down from above and ensure that the nylon slide on the window pane frame is going to go up and down smoothly within the front glass guide. The part numbers listed below were verified in 2011 but the availability from any commercial vendor is not assured. Obviously, Black Dragon went away after we wrote this article. All parts listed are those for the 1972 model year (MY) although some may fit all S30 model years. Check with the vendor to make certain you’re getting the right part for your car. Part Descriptions Part Numbers Sources LH Universal RH Upper sash channel felted gasket 80335-E4102 Nissan (sash above the door panel) 59-870 Black Dragon Lower sash channel felted gasket 80336-E8700 Nissan (lower rear sash inside door panel) Window regulator 80701-N3001 80700-N3001 Nissan, CZCC members, eBay, boneyards Door glass bumper 80841-E4101 80840-E4101 Nissan 30-2151 30-2150 MSA Front glass guide 80211-N3400 80210-N4200 Nissan, CZCC members, eBay, boneyards Rear regulator guide 80710-21000 Nissan, CZCC members, eBay, boneyards Glass support frame 80303-E4100 80302-E4100 Nissan, CZCC members, eBay, boneyards Interior weatherstrip 80846-E4100 80845-E4100 Nissan 59-731 Black Dragon 34-1058 34-1059 MSA Exterior trim piece 80821-N4401 80820-N4401 Nissan, CZCC members, eBay, boneyards (varies by MY, so check) 59-798 59-799 Black Dragon 34-1120 34-1121 MSA
    2 points
  7. Tired of the old SLOW and Tired wipers on your 240Z? Ya, Me too. SO I did some research on the subject over at HybridZ and found that for a few years now, people have been trying to use the 94' Accord and 91' Civic wiper motors as a replacement to the Datsun wiper motor that ONLY like to move if the window is WET... So I read every thread and post on the subject to find out as much as possible. All I found was pictures and posts by people saying that "it works great BUT..... The wiper does'nt PARK when you turn the switch to OFF. You have to shut the wiper switch off at the EXACT moment to get the blades to sit in the usual DOWN position. So I went to the junk yard and pulled a 91' Honda Civic wiper motor, brought it home and tore the gear/contact cover off to find what made it click and Also to find why nobody, after 4 years, could get the wiper to "PARK" I wrote everything down that I saw, put it back together and studied the their wiring diagrams and my diagrams. So I wire up the wiper the way everyone else had been doing it for a few years and started tesing each and every wire. I discovered what they had missed and decided to wire up a relay, the way I thought it should be, to get the wipers to "PARK" and then gave it some power. Slow speed worked great, high speed worked even better. So I kicked it back down to slow then crossed my fingers and turn the switch off. It spun a little before the relay kicked in, then it finished it's rotation and stopped exactly where it should have. So I did it a bunch of times and it stopped in the exact same spot every time. So in other words, I seem to have fixed the problem that plagued people who have done the conversion before. Below is everything you'll need to know about putting in a 91' Honda Civic wiper motor into your 240Z. I've done the conversion and it's FRICKEN AWESOME!!! The first time I tried the wipers was in my garage on a DRY window with NEW wiper blades. I made a video of it for any unbelievers and also to show how the OFF position Parks the blades at the end of the rotation. So here's some more good news, the Datsun wiper motor mounting screws work on the Honda motor AND the Datsun wiper arm bracket will slide right onto the Honda motor shaft without modification. When you go to the Pull-A-Part, SAVE THE BOLTS and the NUT & WASHER. If you buy the motor at the Auto Parts Store, it will NOT normally come with bolts or the bracket mounting nut. Here is the Short list of needed items....... 1) 91' Honda wiper motor (make sure to unplug the motor and also remove the female end from the honda with at least 6 to 8 inches of wire past the female plug, you'll need the female end if you wanna make a custom adaptor type harness) I paid $6.50 at the local Pull-A-Part, Schucks Auto Supply wanted about $100. Go Used. 1) 20/30 amp 12 volt relay from the auto parts store (usually about $5.00) 1) 6-terminal Datsun Plug (exactly like the one on your Datsun wiper motor, or Voltage regulator or pre 3/73' Combo switch on the harness side. I sell these and the terminals if you would like to make a brand new adaptor for your conversion The other possibility is to Cut off your plug and wires from your Datsun Wiper motor, it's up to you. You can even Hard wire the Honda motor in if you'd like. 70' Datsun 240Z __________________ 91' Honda civic wiper motor blue/white-------pin 86 ________ Pin 87A-------blue/white blue-------------pin 87 ________ pin 30--------blue Blue/red-----------pin 85-------pin 85----------green/black Black----------------------to------------------black Blue/yellow----------------to-------------------blue/yellow ________________________________________________________ Here are the pics for drilling the Datsun wiper Plate, notching the plate to seat the Honda motor correctly, and that's it. 5 small cuts, 3 small holes. If you have any questions and don't mind reading alot more, check out this link for every single detail. http://forums.hybridz.org/showthread.php?t=82292 After the New Honda Motor is installed in your Z, turn the wipers on once or twice to 1) Make sure the motor is working correctly and running and 2) to Park the wiper studs in the right position before installing the wiper blades. Feel free to ask questions here, post results, share added info (other years and models of Honda wiper motors that are identical etc.) Dave. Datsun to Honda wiper diagram.bmp
    2 points
  8. A question I commonly see floating around the internet is whether or not it is possible to daily drive a vintage Z car such as the 240Z, 260Z, 280Z, 280ZX, or 300ZX. Of course daily driving a classic car is definitely possible, but an affirmative answer of “yes, you can daily drive one” certainly comes with some caveats. In this article, I will go over a few things to consider when making this decision — routine and unexpected maintenance, theft prevention, depreciation, and much more, including my own experience daily driving a 240Z in college! Quick note for my readers: some of the links on this page may be affiliate links, meaning I receive a commission (at no extra cost to you) if you click on the link and make a purchase. I only recommend products I’ve used and trust unless stated otherwise. My Experience Daily Driving a 240Z NOTE: Below is a story of buying my 240Z and why I was so dead-set on daily driving it. If you’d just like to skip to tips and advice on daily driving a Z-car, you can just scroll past this section. In high school, I fell in love with the feeling of driving my dad’s 1970 Z28 Camaro. He let me drive it whenever I wanted during the summer months, so as soon as I learned how to drive a manual transmission, I’d take it out nearly every night to drive around town while the streets were quiet and uncrowded. That experience was cathartic for me. The excitement of a powerful V8 and the close connection you have driving an older vehicle is a special feeling in itself. There is little else you end up focusing on apart from the road. After graduating, I moved 400 miles away to attend college in another state. Among all the changes and stresses of becoming a college student, I realized how much I missed driving an old car all the time. I couldn’t bring the Z28 to college of course, so I began to look for alternative cars that would give me that same feeling I missed. I grew up around American muscle cars, so I may have never even seen a 240Z until this YouTube video popped up one day. Instantly, I fell in love with the look and sound of the 240Z. I began to research prices and whether or not I could afford such a car. Earlier in my search, I found that most cars in my price range wouldn’t have the vintage feeling I knew from the Z28. I had some money saved up from working throughout high school, but not $30,000 for a second-gen Camaro! When I discovered the 240Z, I thought that if I looked hard enough, I could find a decent one to enjoy. So I began my search, and quickly became frustrated at the amount of rusty 240Zs that would otherwise be excellent cars. I kept at it though, checking the classifieds around the country daily. A lot of what I learned is detailed in the ZCarGuide 240Z Buyer’s Guide and Pricing Guide. Eventually, I found a dry 240Z in Arizona while on vacation with my family. It was priced very fairly, looked great from the pictures, and the owner seemed trustworthy over the phone. I begged my dad to go look at it with me, and we took off to Flagstaff, AZ. It ended up being a fantastic car. Low miles, absolutely no rust, and the owner had kept up with all maintenance you could possibly want on the car — with corresponding receipts and notes saved! Window sticker, original Datsun dealer plate frame, even a can of 918 New Sight Orange touch up paint from 1971! The car was so nice, that I actually had a new problem… it might have been too nice for what I planned to do with it! I knew that back at college, I’d have no indoor storage for it. A car that had enjoyed garaged life in dry Arizona for 40+ years, would suddenly sit outside in an East Coast college town for two years? Maybe not such a great idea. Even before I began my search, I decided that I’d bring it home where I could garage it, long before the first snowfall hit, so that wasn’t much of a concern. My main concern was possible rust and theft. I decided that I would not let my good luck ironically spoil my plans of treating this car the way I intended. Instead, I took it as a sign that I should enjoy this car regardless of environment. Looking back, I’m really glad I made that decision. Although I definitely took some precautions to make sure big issues didn’t occur (which I’ll detail below) I never had any problems with theft, breaking down, or really anything major. In fact, the car served me exactly how I wanted it to — I got my nights of driving once traffic had calmed down in town to relax and unwind, and always loved being “that guy” on campus driving around in the orange 240Z (actually, the “orange Porsche” depending on who you asked). Maintenance and Rust Proofing A cheap battery tender is a great investment so you’re never stuck with battery issues. Ask anyone who drives a vintage car regularly, and you’ll get the same answer in some form or another — you need to keep up with regularly scheduled maintenance. Add in the rust prone nature of the 240Z, and you really need to be on your toes. For me, this meant regularly changing and topping off oil, keeping the tires full of air, charging the battery with a good tender charger like this one when I could, swapping in some fresh spark plugs, among other tasks. Another aspect of maintaining your 240Z that I felt was important was making sure I was protected from rust as best I could manage. I personally found a local Line-X store which offered protective coating for the underside of my 240Z. Originally I was afraid to even drive the car in the rain, fearing water spraying into nooks and crannies of the underside where rust would start. However, with some protective coating, and garaging the car long before any salt made its way onto the roads for the winter, I still do not have even the beginnings of rust underneath my 240Z. As I said earlier, due to my relatively meticulous maintenance, I never had any major issues. I had to replace the clutch slave cylinder once but that was actually an inexpensive and easy repair. I also replaced the ignition switch as it started to get really finicky and I suspected it was going to break on me completely at some point. I bought this replacement ignition switch on eBay and was blown away by the level of quality in that replacement part. For $50, you can’t beat it. Convenience Another potential issue of driving a classic Z car regularly is that there are definitely some convenience problems that will arise. While it was always fun to take along a passenger for a ride, not being able to take any other passengers was sometimes difficult. This probably won’t be an issue for you, and to be honest it wasn’t that big of a deal for me, but being a college student it sometimes would’ve been really handy to be able to take even one additional passenger. I’d be lying if I said I never had a smaller passenger lie down in the cargo area for some short trip, but again, not convenient. Another issue, especially in some very humid summers, was the lack of air conditioning. Although I was fortunate in that my 240Z was one of the rare few that came from the dealership with an installed A/C unit, it certainly didn’t blow too cold. I had it professionally repaired once and even before it broke again, it never provided that much comfort. I may consider buying a modern A/C conversion kit like this one from ZCarDepot some day. Overall, I had to rely on good ol’ 280 air (2 windows down, 80 miles an hour) and made do with some extra USB fans that I connected to the cigarette lighter. Certainly not an ideal situation (I showed up to my first job interview literally drenched in sweat because of this) but still worth it. There are a few other miscellaneous convenience issues with driving a classic Z car. Many Z-cars have the infamous gas leak through the interior side of the rear hatch vents, but I taped them shut and never had an issue again. I’d imagine I won’t be happy with the state of that panel when I remove the tape, but I also enjoyed not getting a headache every time I had to drive more than an hour. One positive that you won’t expect: The 240Z gets incredible gas mileage in my opinion. I had to drive hundreds of miles back and forth from home to college, and I regularly got over 25 mpg. Theft Prevension The SpyTec GL300 is by far the most comprehensive anti-theft approach you can take to securing your classic car. My absolute biggest fear with the Z-car was that it would be stolen while I had it at college. Because the single most effective automotive theft prevention technique is keeping your car garaged, I felt like I was really leaving myself vulnerable in this regard. Not to mention, the college town I lived in was a super high-crime area. I spent a lot of time researching this and actually wrote a complete guide on Classic Car Theft Prevention but I ended up focusing on two key precautions: GPS Tracker — After shopping around, I decided to buy a SpyTec GL300 tracker which served me well. The device itself is very cheap and the tracking service offered by SpyTec is similarly inexpensive. I originally thought I would have issues with charging the device, but it lasts at least two weeks on a full charge and only takes an hour or so to charge up to full. I would just charge it every week or so, and then stash it away inside the storage area behind the driver’s seat. SpyTec offers geofencing so you can get alerts when the car leaves a specified area. Removing the distributor rotor — Anytime I had to leave my 240Z for more than a little while, or felt sketchy about the area I was parking in, I would remove my distributor rotor. Simply pop the hood, snap off the retaining clips on your distributor cap, and pull the rotor directly off. Good luck to anyone who wants to start the car at that point. Of course, this doesn’t prevent anyone from loading it on to a flatbed or something, but it is a nice additional layer of security. What kind of Z? A nice 280ZX would be a fantastic car to daily drive. Another factor that you should consider if you are in the position I was — wanting to daily drive a 240Z — you may want to consider broadening your search to the entire Z-car spectrum. You can still find 280Zs, 280ZXs, and 300ZXs that would work fantastically for this purpose. Of course, the older the Z, the less it will give you that “old car feeling” I was after. However, I recognize how lucky I was to find such a great 240Z at the price I bought it for, and I realize that the market has changed drastically since then. If I were to be back in the market again for a Z car I could daily drive, I might look more for a 280ZX. A well kept 280ZX is a fantastic car to drive and has many of the creature-comforts you may not find in an older Z-car. I’m not saying that the 280ZX isn’t a wonderful car, because it is, but it may offer you an enjoyable ride without some of the headaches and worries a 240Z or 280Z would come with. Best of all, 280ZX prices are very affordable at the moment. If this interests you, I recommend you check out our 280ZX Classifieds Page. Overall, I’d say: DO IT! Moving out of my dorm sophomore year was certainly interesting. The internet is full of naysayers, and the online car community is no different. After reading tons of advice from people who say driving a decades old car is simply impractical and stupid, and that my car would be stolen within 20 minutes, I decided to go for it because I had done my research. I’d probably feel differently if my Z car had been stolen, or ran into by some drunk college kid on campus, but none of that happened, and I had an absolute blast. While I fully respect and love the collector car community, not every classic car should spend its life in a garage, only seeing the light of day when it’s 70 and sunny with a 0% chance of rain. Do your research, make the right preparations, but know that it is not only possible, but recommended if you ask me!
    2 points
  9. The early Z's used a simple vinyl covering on the A-pillars, but in 77 they switched to a screw retained plastic trim A-pillar cover. Well Datsun must have messed up some dimension somewhere because the plastic trim covers often crack due to the stress of tightening the screws. On my right hand side, I had one of the screws pull through. Cracked the plastic mounting hole clean off. My first attempt to remedy the situation was to simply buy another used pair somewhere off some forum. Unfortunately, the donor pair I bought not only had the same problem, but it was even the same screw, same location. This meant that I couldn't even use one side from my original pair, and the other side from the donor pair. It became clear that this is a common problem and it's not just me. With that in mind, I took matters into my own hands. Here's what I started with. My right side. Completely cracked off mounting hole in the lower position: It's supposed to look like this. Here's the other side where the screw boss is still intact: Figuring I had nothing to lose, I put a piece of tape over the hole on the visible side: Crosshatched the plastic on the hidden side: Taped a short length of small diameter cardboard tube where the mounting boss should be and filled the moat with epoxy: Gave it a day to cure, peeled off the cardboard, and using a dremel and some hand filing, I contoured the new boss to fit the into place on the car and drilled the hole for the screw: Countersink the other side for the screw head: Used a small brush to paint the exposed epoxy: And after the paint dried, the repair is nearly invisible: So I also figured that since I'd already seen two broken bosses, I would take the opportunity to reinforce the remaining ones which had not broken off (yet). I crosshatched the area and blobbed on a generous amount of epoxy to support the posts. And while I was looking at everything, I also noticed a couple small cracks starting to form along the edges, so I made a couple metal splints and epoxied them into place as reinforcement. After all this work, these things should be good for another forty years. Here's one of the splints next to a reinforced mounting boss: Installed back in the car, and I know it's the little things, but I don't have to look over at the right side of the car and see that missing screw in the cracked off mounting boss! Happy Happy!
    2 points
  10. Here's a primer on how to adjust the doors on your Z so that they fit properly and seal well. ADJUSTING THE Z DOORS: Unless the car has been in an accident and the door opening or door itself have been tweaked out of shape, most problems with the doors are due to misaligned latches, hinges, or worn components. Presuming that it is adjustment or bad parts and not bent items check the following. First perform a visual check of the door. Check to make sure that the door is aligned properly within the door opening. Check the spacing along the top part of the window frame, the spacing between the window frame and the quarter window, also the spacing between the door skin and the rear quarter panel. I also check the spacing on the front of the door, above the hinges and the front fender. All of these should be even, and consistent in width. The gap should not appear to be excessive one edge with it's opposite component, i.e. front of door to back of door; top edge by windshield cowl and lower edge, etc. If all these appear in order then you have an adjustment problem with the latch mechanism. If however, there is a problem with the alignment, before you go and loosen the hinge bolts behind the kick panels, first do the following: 1. Check if there is any vertical play to the door, that is, with the door open lift the door gently. If there is a noticeable movement up and down, then you may have a worn pin or pins that are causing the alignment problem. Check to make sure that the hinges are solidly affixed and if so, then you definitely have a worn hinge. Although it is difficult to find new hinges, you might need to replace one or both. On Chevy's it is a known problem and parts stores sell new hinge pin inserts to fix this. This is an often overlooked problem, so check this first before you dismount the door or start adjusting the latch etc. 2. If the hinges are in good condition and there is no vertical play, check your weatherstripping. I know of a case where a guy filled the cavity in his weatherstripping with silicone in order to get a "tight" seal. Unfortunately, it also increased the thickness of the gasket and made it almost impossible to close the door without a hydraulic ram. He finally replace the weatherstrip. Check to make sure that the weatherstripping is mounted properly on the lip of the door opening, also the rubber splash guard on the front part of the door just above the hinges. Check the lower weatherstrip on the under lip of the door. Any one of these could cause the door to shut hard. 3. If both the above are ok, check to see where the latch is striking the striker plate. The striker plate is on the door frame and the latch is on the door. Both must line up in order to catch. The latch on the door has countersunk screws and hence is fixed in position. The striker plate on the door is the major adjustment item. It can be positioned along the 4 axis on each of the screws. Close the door, if the door exterior is not flush with the rear quarter panel skin, then you need to move the striker plate in (towards the seat for a protruding door edge) and out (for a sunken door skin). If the door is difficult to close AND the handle is hard to operate, check the bottom of the striker plate to make sure that it isn't inclined too far inward in relation to the top of the plate. That is, the door latches, and the skin lines up, but it feels as you are forcing the door to close and forcing the handle to open, then the bottom part of the latch is stressing the latch, Loosen the screws, and WITHOUT moving the top part of the plate, adjust the lower portion of the plate outwards. Align and retry. If the door latches but springs back when slammed the bottom of the striker plate is probably out too far. This appears to be a half-way latch, and only the safety position has been achieved. If when closing the door, there is a noticeable thunk, and when opening the door the door seems to "DROP", then the striker plate is set too high. The reverse occurs when the plate is too low, although in this instance the door usually will not latch. If you find that you have to move the door within it's opening, then it gets a little more complicated. In a nutshell; you need to remove the electrical components attached to the kick panels, remove the kick panels, and preferably with a jack supporting the door, or a friend, loosen the hinge bolts located behind the kick panels and adjust the door to fit. It makes it easier to remove the striker plate mechanism in order to ensure a good fit. DO NOT remove the hinges from the door, or loosen these bolts unless there is a problem with the hinge. The hinge pins must be PARALLEL and IN LINE to work properly, and it is too easy to get these out of line and introduce serious stress to the door. Sorry for the length, but hope it covered your question and options. Enrique Scanlon
    2 points
  11. I'm fairly new to this web site and have seen several articles on clocks. This is of particular interest to me as I do have some experience with total clock reconditioning. I've been repairing, refurbishing and specializing in 70-83 Datsun /Nissan clocks for the last 8 years and thought I would pass on several bits of trivia and technical information. I never really thought about NOT using oil on a clock as that seems to be common knowledge until a friend came to me years ago with a 240Z clock. Bill knew I worked on all sorts of electronic hardware and was soliciting my input. His problem was that his clock had stopped (like it was the only 240 clock that didn't work). I have a 75 280z and my clock has always worked. I was wondering why bills didn't? I took has clock apart and began to understand why. Bill said he had removed the clock and flushed it out with WD-40? and then lightly oiled all the components. The clock worked for several months and then quit and this was the second time for this occurance. After I looked at the clock in detail I could see why. The automotive environment is very tough on all the components and the most critical parts are hermetically sealed. The first generation 240Z Datsun clocks were not hermetically sealed and susceptible to all the dust, dirt, chemicals, humidity and temperature. JECO, the Datsun subcontractor, who built most of the Datsun clocks never used oiled for good reason. Oil attracts all the nasty contaminants that can wear out critical clock components and eventually grinds the clock to a halt. I know I know everyone always uses oil on their grandfathers clocks. If you think about it we change our engine oil which is filtered for the very same reason, so that the engine will last longer and not wear due to....the dirty oil. The first generation clocks (240z) have what's called a "NO LOAD" motor which keeps the main spring of this clock contiguously wound. The rest of the clock consists of gears, paws, and bearings that rotate and work in unison to move the clock hands. The problem is that any gear or bearing that produces friction slows the entire clock and if sever enough the clock will stop. Are you beginning to see a pattern here. Oil that is used to lubricate (all oil) coats the surface of moving parts and eventually starts to collect contaminants. Eventually this causes the viscosity (on a micro level) to thicken and produce resistance to the overall clock operation. In addition the change in temperature alone will change the oil viscosity. Believe me when I say it takes very very little resistance in any of the clock parts to stop this mechanism. When solvent other than alcohol is used to "flush" the clock all your doing is removing the contaminants, but when you apply oil you start the process all over again. If you don't mind removing your 240z clock every year or so then I guess that's ok. After helping Bill reinstall his clock I'd opt for a clock that would work forever (we did but that's another article). The 240z guys and girls have a rough time compared to rest of us removing and installing their clock. That is unless the dash is removed. This is what I have found works the best, denatured alcohol. You should remove each and every clock part, clean all parts with an artists brush, inspect the cleaned parts, and reassemble (NO OIL). Let me say that again...NO OIL.This can be a rather daunting task and is not for the weak of heart or those with limited patience. I know this works because I've cleaned way to many 240 clocks and I still have one of Bills 240Z clocks on my test bench. It works and it keeps pretty good time. It doesn't get much outside time, but that's why it's still working. If I get enough interest I'll write a weekly article on "how to" for each of the four generation clocks. Like what goes wrong, how do fix it, what's interchangeable, how do I clean it, what kind of paint to use and so on. Hope this was helpful and please give me feedback. Thanks.........Ron
    2 points
  12. This is a simple step by step procedure to test the EFI fuel system for internal fuel leakage. Any corrections or improvements, please pass them on. Then we can all benefit. Instruction - Fuel Pressure Test 280Z RevC.pdf
    1 point
  13. Hi I'm the owner of a 06/1972 240z with stock 4 speed b-style transmission and 3.36 differential. I recently went to change the gaskets on my speedometer gear, but unfortunately when reinserting it forced it in, causing the teeth to strip out. I am now in the process of looking for the (stock) 16 tooth yellow speedometer gear but am unable to find one online. With that thought in mind, my speedometer does read high (8 mph or so over at 70 mph) due to my slightly larger tire setup (195/70r14). I am now considering the black 17 tooth speedometer gear, but unfortunately cannot find just the drive gear online. My only options are a 17 tooth with the different style housing (what looks to be aluminum), which I have read has a different overall length. Would it be possible to swap the speedometer pinion gear from the later style speedometer gear assembly into my stock housing? Or will this later style fit? Looking for ideas/possible people with an abundance of 16 or 17 tooth speedometer gears!
    1 point
  14. Z's are notorious for leaking exhaust gasses (or fumes) into the interior. This article details a procecss to find and eliminate the sources. To make the article easier to read, key photos are hot linked, while additional views just have a hyperlink you can click on. When driving with a window open, the air rushing around the windshield and drip moulding creates low pressure in the front half of the open window. This vacuum is what draws the air in the back half of the open window, and ultimately draws in exhaust fumes through any leak near the back of the car. If the windows and doors do not seal well, exhaust is drawn in (to a lesser effect), even with the windows closed. Granted when driving there is a low pressure area over the whole hatch and rear panel of the car, but not nearly as strong as the low pressure formed from an open window. This should also improve heater performance, since you can also find and eliminate high pressure air leaks. Equipment needed: To recreate the leaks in a garage, you need: A shop vacuum. Some cardboard. About 3 feet of 1/4" to 3/16" automotive vacuum hose (to act as a stethoscope). A roll of masking tape. Optionally you can also use a DJ smoke or fog machine (rented from an equipment/party rental facility). It makes finding leak areas easier. To seal the leaks you need: Seam sealer or caulk for tiny leaks (like GE Silicone II in clear and/or black available at home centers). Dum Dum (like 3M strip caulk #08578 available at NAPA) or duct seal (like Blackburn duct seal available at home centers) for small to medium leaks. Depending on where you have leaks, you may also need: Spray adhesive (like 3M general trim adhesive #08088) to attach interior vinyl. Replacement body plugs, grommets, gaskets and interior trim plastic rivets (from Nissan or aftermarket Z specialists). The test setup: If using a smoke machine, Set it on a piece of cardboard inside the hatch compartment (facing rearward) and send the power and remote cords out the passenger window. Close up of the Smoke Machine: Test firing the smoke machine... Open the passenger window about 3" and seal the shop vac floor nozzle to the upper rear corner of the window frame with tape. Cover the rest of the window opening with cardboard, and seal the opening inside and out with masking tape. Another view: Turn the dashboard vent control to "Off," and close both fresh air vents under the corners of the dash. The shop vac can now be used to pressurize (hook the hose up to "blowing" port) or depressurize (hook the hose up to the vacuum port) the interior. The depressurize test: Close the hatch and driver window, seal the round vents behind the quarter panel windows (if equipped) with tape, hook the shop vac hose to "vacuum," turn it on, get in the car and close the driver door. Feel for air coming in the dash vents and fresh air vents. Either repair the leaks now or temporarily seal them up with tape - these leaks hurt heater performance in the winter. With vacuum on, feel around the interior with the back of your hand for leaks. Below are some possible leak areas and fixes (fix each leak as you find it (either permanently or temporarily) and it will make it easier to find each successive leak): Hatch seal - check alignment of hatch (adjust hinges & striker), replace hatch seal and/or add additional "universal" weatherstrip to close gap as needed. Even with a new gasket and properly adjusted hatch, I needed to add a strip of "universal" foam to the upper edge of the hatch to get a seal. This image is with the hatch slightly open, showing how the gasket touches the hatch on either side of the hinge, but leaves a gap in the hinge centers. Hatch filler panel - remove and add thin universal weatherstrip around underside if leaking from edges, on Series I 240Z's (cars with 2 horizontal chrome vents on the outside of the hatch) if leaking from slots, remove panel and clean / repair vent flaps, on non-Series 1 cars, check the large rubber body plugs on the outside of the hatch about a foot from either side of the latch. Bottom of strut towers - under the diagonals for the strut towers (under the vinyl) there is a 1.5" diameter body hole with no grommet (this is over where the rear diff crossmember mounts to the frame rail). Where the diagonal mounts to the floor is also not fully sealed. All of these holes suck air through the frame rails. Nissan did not plug or seal these holes - the vinyl trim is supposed to seal off area. Either seal the vinyl to the floor, or peel back the vinyl and seal these areas (or do both). Tail lamp panel, dome lamp panel & speaker openings - the many possible sources will be checked with the pressurize test. If you remove the interior panels, the fuel tank vent hoses, antenna drain hose & grommet, tail light gaskets, unsealed sheet metal seams, and rust holes are common causes. Door or window seals - replace. Shifter - replace inner shift boot. The pressurize test: On Series 1 cars, seal up the body vents by taping up the slots on the inner hatch trim panel. From outside of the vehicle, close the doors, attach the vac hose to the "blowing" port, and if you have the smoke machine, plug it in and fill the interior with smoke. Filling up (the smoke does not stain)... All full... Turn on the vacuum and look for large leak areas (every Z has lots!). Feel with the back of your hand, confirming location with the "stethoscope" hose held up to your ear (note that you are doing this at your own risk - I accept no liability if you injure your ear drum, a bug crawls in your ear, of if you forgot the hose was full of some toxic substance). Starting from the rear of the vehicle (again, fix each leak as you find it -- it makes it easier to find remaining leaks): Tail lamp vents - (2 on bottom of each tail lamp). Remove felt "filters" if present and seal with clear caulk. The lamp sockets are not sealed, providing adequate ventilation without the outer vents. This should also stop the internal lens discoloration due to exhaust gasses flowing through the lamp. Under hatch - The hatch has a thick inner and a thin outer gasket. Any leak between the gaskets draws in exhaust. With the hatch open you can seal the opening with cardboard, taping it to the inner gasket and run a pressurize test or just open the hatch and seal the following: Round body plugs on either side of hatch rail. Pinch weld above hatch hinges (just below the outer seal along the roof edge) - caulk gaps. Hatch hinges to the body - Seal any gaps (exopsed adjustment or shim slots, seal the hinge gasket to the body, and if a pressure check confirms a leak from inside the hinge pocket, remove the hatch & hinges and seal any splits and cracks inside the rubber hinge pocket seals. This was a hard to find leak. In this photo, the hatch and hinges are removed. The hinges fit into a pocket along the roof edge. Behind the metal plate is a rubber boot that fits inside and seals the pocket. One of the pockets on this car had a crack deep inside the pocket and an area worn through from rubbing on the hinge. The part is no longer available from Nissan, so some glue and liquid rubber was used to seal it up. The gaskets also sealed poorly to the roof support (caulk sealed it up). There were also numerous leaks between the inner (thick) and outer (thin upper) gasket in the photo. Anywhere two pieces of sheet metal were spot welded together needed caulk. Continue the pressure test under the car: In the below photo, many leaks are sealed at this point, allowing the smoke coming from under the driver rear fender to be visible. Potential under the car leak sources: Evap emission hoses & grommets - just behind the rear valence panel - use the stethoscope to pinpoint. Seam welds around floor behind rear valence (you may need to remove the fuel tank, or use the stethescope hose to thoroughly check). Antenna drain hose and grommet - on driver's side behind wheel well. If lots of air comes out of the hose, it could be disconnected from the antenna or the antenna may need to be sealed. Remove the inner hatch trim panel to check. Pinch welds just forward of the antenna drain, and seam welds going back to rear valance panel. Evap hoses and grommets on passenger side, behind wheel well. Pinch welds just forward of evap hoses and seam welds going back to rear valence panel (removing the splash shield behind the passenger tire may ease access without needing to drop the tank. Wheel housing inner pinch weld in front of rear tire. Pinch weld under rocker panel (toward rear) Round holes under outside rocker panels (these can be plugged with the same rubber plugs used on either side of the hatch rails, and some sealant). Don't seal the oval drain ports in the inside of the frame rails. Body plugs in spare tire well and driver and passenger floors. Rest of car: Pinch welds on forward side of gas door opening (upper and lower corners). Hatch compartment floor rubber body plugs (remove carpet and check - these lead into the frame rails and can draw exhaust). Body plugs behind seats (remove carpet and check - for Series 1 these are in the storage bins). These lead into the frame rails. Grommets & throttle rod boot on firewall. Below are links to additional Exhaust Fume Articles: "Solving the Fume Problem in a 280Z" by Zhorse: "Exhaust Fumes in 1st Generation Z Cars" by rzola: Happy hunting... Here's to summer driving without burning eyes and a passed out passenger... Edit: 2020-06-01 by Mike: Updated all image links and cross posts.
    1 point
  15. I did this modification in July 2014, it's now November 2015 and it's still running strong. The modification is totally concealed in the TIU so the original harness is unchanged. To revert back to original is simple as changing the TIU. The instruction is based on a 1977 280Z, but it can also be used for the 1978 280Z TIU with the terminal block connector. You will need to cut the metal strips that connect the terminals in the terminal block to the circuits. Be sure to leave enough to solder the wires. The terminal block can be fitted, using the original screws, to the aluminium base plates. See link to the files area where you can download: Regards Chas This post has been promoted to an article
    1 point
  16. Just for grins, I'll summarize the process of removing the dash in case it helps anyone else, having done this around six times on my 1983 280ZX: 1) Remove left and right foot well trim panels under dash (2 screws each) 2) Remove radio console (one screw holds the triangular trim piece on each side, then 4 bolts on each side; you may not have to remove wire harnesses if there's enough slack to sit the panel on the passenger floorboards) 3) Disconnect various-colored wiring harnesses on passenger side firewall. 4) Remove two large factory cable ties next to wiring harnesses; these retain the harnesses to the dash frame (these are re-usable; release the ties by pressing on the small tab on the upper side between the tail end and the metal frame, then push the tail end back out of the tie) 4) Remove the steering wheel shroud, then with a punch lightly mark the steering wheel relative to the steering shaft so you can re-install the wheel centered during re-assembly. Remove the steering wheel. I have heard that some have removed the dash without pulling the steering wheel, but I can't imagine how they did it. It's worth doing it right. 5) Loosen one screw on the right side of the turn signal assy to release the clamp holding the turn signal assy on the steering column. Disconnect wiring harnesses and slide turn signal assy forward off the shaft - it can dangle. 6) Reach under dash on the right/passenger side of the steering column and disconnect speedometer cable near the firewall (this is easy to forget) 7) Remove cosmetic plugs over four screws on top of dash - try to preserve them, they're hard to find. ? Remove the 8 main dashboard screws/bolts: four screws across top of dash, four bolts on bottom side of dash (two of the bottom bolts are hidden by the radio console until you remove it) 9) Remove five screws holding the center dash vent trim in place; remove center trim panel, now remove two screws holding the heat/AC control box to the dash frame. (This is really easy to miss.)You may now remove the dash. Try not to scrape it on the A-pillar trim too much; you may tape over the A-pillar trim to minimize the potential for scrapes. I find it easiest to pull the passenger side forward first; keep it low so it won't jam the dash in place. Re-installation is the reverse; right after you set the dash back in place, don't forget to check the position of the speedo cable and re-connect it. A common problem is that the cable gets routed down the left side of the steering column and can't be connected, which requires pulling the dash again. Try and avoid this.
    1 point
  17. This forum has been very helpful to me. As a means of documenting some of what we have done and to help others avoid some of my mistakes I thought I would post the installation of a vintage gen II mini AC system. Background: My son and I are restoring a 1973 240z. We call it the bucket, as there was a significant amount of rust that had to be dealt with and our other choice – Money Pit was already taken. We are changing the color from 113 avocado green to mango orange, it has an L-28 engine and a 5 speed gear box. At this point: the car was taken to bare metal, metal replaced where required and any rust has been eliminated the rear clip is painted, front and rear suspension has been restored/upgraded and installed brake system has been restored/upgraded and installed half axles, differential, driveshaft, transmission, engine have been restored/upgraded and installed fuel system has been restored and is installed cooling system has been restored/upgraded and installed electrical harness has been restored/upgraded and the cockpit harness is installed When we purchased the car, it did have a non-working aftermarket AC system, probably installed at the dealership. We decided to replace the AC, defrost, and heater with an integrated system from Vintage Air. Vintage Air recommended a Gen II Mini The Gen II is a replacement for the original heater core, air box, and under-dash AC evap. As you can imagine the gen ii is quite a bit smaller than the original components, but it is a universal system and therefore it needs to be shoe horned into a space under the original dash. Because I removed so much original material, I thought that I would be able to fit the combination evaporator/heater and air box above the transmission tunnel and behind the instrument panel. This gets it away from the passenger footwell and centers the defrost and climate openings. I found someone that had done something similar so I was fairly confident that I would not have a fitment issue with the dash. Brackets are provided with the Gen II but I did not find them to be particularly useful. Mounting is fairly straightforward, but if you are like me sometimes it takes a few proto-types to get something that satisfies you. Mounting the Evaporator Once the evaporator is in place you can decide where hoses need to enter/exit the firewall. It is always nice to use the original holes, but you need to consider the radius of the bends for the hoses as they do not like to make sharp turns. I decided to install bulkheads for both the AC hoses and the heater hoses. I like this luxury because if the engine has to come out or if anything goes wrong with the evaporator/heater then disassembly stops at the firewall. Also if any of the hoses fail you don’t have to disconnect at the evaporator to replace an engine bay hose and vice versa. Working these stiff hoses and close connections under the dash is not the most comfortable task, The only downside that I can think of regarding bulkhead connections is that there are additional breaks in the hoses that now require some sort of mechanical connection and this is yet another opportunity for a leak. I did not have to cut any additional holes in the firewall but I would recommend that you buy individual bulkhead connectors as opposed to 2-way or 4-way bulkheads. This probably makes it easier to use the original holes. Bulkhead Connections water connections are behind the evap, compressor connections are near the main harness entry. Those are EZ-coils fitted on the hoses to help keep them from collapsing due to a sharp radius you can see the water connections on the passenger side of the engine just below the level of the valve cover. Compressor lines enter the bay just above the passenger frame rail. I would have preferred to do all of the hose routing with the engine out of the way, but I was concerned that I could not visualize every aspect. The AC compressor is a bit of a chore to mount so I will do that while the engine is on a stand. Here is what is being replaced – a Nissan bracket, and a sanden compressor. The original compressor is much lighter than most that were used in the day like York, but the original combination still weighs 24 lbs. Original Bracket and Compressor I tried to use the original bracket. Even though it is heavy and bulky it is clearly better because the compressor can be mounted so that it does not have to move to install a v-belt. There is an integral idler pulley that is adjustable. I spent valuable time cleaning the bracket and the pulley in preparation for painting, but alas I could not figure out a good way to modify it to accept the new compressor and properly align it with the engine pulley. The bracket that I purchased from Vintage is simple (no idler pulley) but it is made to convert a York bracket. Unfortunately, it does not line up with the bucket’s pulley. So my choices were to somehow modify the simple bracket or build a new bracket. I decided to attempt a mechanical solution as opposed to modifying the bracket by welding a piece on. The problem really has two pieces: the compressor must align with the engine pulley and because there is no Idler pulley it must rotate to install and adjust the v-belt. Here is what I came up with. It is 9lbs lighter. I will continue to look for a more elegant solution with an idler pulley, but I need to get the engine back in the car. NEW AC Bracket and Compressor With the engine and radiator in place it is an easy task to route the Compressor hoses to the bulkhead. Vintage offers a connect system called “easy clip”. I have not used this before but it allows me to construct all of the hoses myself without the usual expense of a crimping tool. This will make start-up of the AC system much simpler, because I will be able to go to a shop and only require evacuation, drying and filling to get the system working. This should take about an hour as opposed to waiting for someone to construct the crimp hoses and depend on someone else to route the hoses to my satisfaction. Hopefully, the easy clip system works well and does not leak. Condenser The condenser and drier were both part of the gen II kit. Bracketing the condenser was fairly easy. You need to take into account the holes in the radiator support as the hose that sources the drier must go through the support. It would have been nice to mount the drier ahead of the support where the air is coolest but it was more convenient for me to put it on the engine side. I converted to an aluminum radiator with an electric fan so I installed a trinary switch on the drier. So, the routing of the hoses is: Evap to Comp, Comp to condenser, condenser to drier and drier back to the evap. The route that I took was evap across the firewall to the comp mounted driver side low, from the compressor thru the radiator support across the condenser to a connection on the passenger side of the condenser from the condenser thru the radiator support to the drier, from the drier along the passenger frame rail to the firewall to the evap. That is a 2 row aluminum radiator painted black with a dual electric fan setup. I still think that it is strange to use a 2 row, but based on what I read I convinced myself that 2 rows were actually better than 3 or 4 for the same overall length and width. The condenser is visible here - in front of the radiator Climate Control Panel The last piece of the puzzle – mounting the controls. When this project began, I had no idea what I was going to do with regard to the climate control panel. Trust me this restoration has had enough challenges, but I wanted the controls to look they were part of the car. Originally, I envisioned the new panel hidden behind the original panel with mechanical linkages to control the system. I ordered a panel from vintage air, their least expensive. It allows for 4 slide type controls: AC compressor on/off combined with AC temperature control, Heater temperature control, Fan speed control, and Mode (defrost, feet, body, body+feet) control. Now that I have good handle on the mounting of the evaporator and know that the dash will fit without interfering with the evap I can consider using the original Datsun climate control panel which had the original mechanical controls for the vent, heater and defroster. The bucket had an aftermarket AC system, but it did not have anything integrated so the compressor control and the AC temperature control were all hung external to the dash. The Datsun climate control panel accommodates three slide controls: outside air, heater temperature, mode (defrost, feet, body, body+feet) control; and a rotary fan speed control. The controls for the original AC system were appended to the dash and did not compliment the look and feel of the car. The original climate control panel and the vintage air panel I decided that I was going to attempt to integrate the vintage air controls into the 240z panel. My control panel was not in very good shape so I decided to use it to trial fit everything. I opted for the luxury of replacing my panel with a new one. MSA does make one – it’s approximately $130. Its plastic, well built, but nothing special. They have a slightly more expensive version with chrome accents – I was not smart enough to order that version, so I spent more to have the fun of trying to do chrome accents myself. The first obvious difference between the original and the vintage controls is the fan control. I ordered a rotary fan switch from vintage air to replace the slider that I originally purchased. The hole in the 240z panel must be opened a bit to accommodate the vintage air control. If you go this route, remember to be careful as you are working with plastic, so cracking is a real possibility. Next, I removed each of the slide switches from the vintage air panel. In my opinion the best/easiest way to integrate them into the 240z panel was to create an intermediate metal panel to house the vintage air controls and then mount the intermediate panel onto the 240z plastic panel. The metal panel should help distribute the forces of the sliders and will allow me to more easily position the sliders where I need them. It’s not as easy as it sounds. The travel of the vintage air sliders is quite a bit smaller than the original 240z controls. I considered mounting the sliders a few inches back from the 240z panel which would make the slider travel more similar to the original but it complicated everything else so I rejected the idea. The length of the vintage air slider mechanisms is also different than the original 240z controls. The vintage air heater temperature control is a bit hooky in my opinion. It is mounted to the vintage air panel by being squeezed by their bracket. There is no provision to screw it to a panel. It’s quite small. I used thin aluminum sheet stock to build trial configurations. It’s easy to bend and easy to cut and you can expose a lot of issues very quickly by using a proto-typing process. The AC control is relatively large. I decided to fit it into the top slot of the plastic panel labeled “AIR”. In my opinion - this is where it fits best. You can mount it without a lot of difficulty with one exception – the length of the slide control is too short. If you choose to go this route don’t purchase the vintage air panel (it’s a waste of money), and when you order the controls make sure that they provide full length sliders. When they build a kit with their panel, they cut the sliders to fit their panel and it is too short for the Datsun panel. I very carefully bent the L shaped bracket flat. I then removed enough material from the bracket to allow the slider to protrude through the plastic panel enough so that I could attach a plastic knob to it. I wanted to use the original 240z knobs to help disguise the vintage air system. One of my knobs was cracked and so I searched for a replacement. I found some new ones at Banzai Motor Works that were reasonable. The heater temperature control will fit just below the AC control. I built a small aluminum bracket that pinches the heater control and attaches to the climate control panel. Lateral movement of the heater control is prevented by the aluminum bracket and vertical movement is prohibited because the heater control is held in place by the ac control above it. The mode control will fit in the climate control panel’s third (lowest) slot. Here is an image of the original control panel with all of the controls mounted to it. Also, you need to seal off the cowl vent because there is no provision for the vintage air system to utilize that vent. The only fresh air vent system that you will have will come from the vents on the driver and passenger side which are controlled by individual mechanical cables. These vents actually get their air thru the ducts to the opening in the radiator support. The bottom line is that the original 240Z panel will remain in-tact and the new system will seamlessly fit behind it. You will not be able to tell that the entire climate system has been upgraded. vintage air controls Integrated Panel CONCLUSION If you choose to upgrade your AC system and you opt to integrate the controls into the original climate control panel you can benefit from my mistakes. Do not order the panel/control kit. Instead order the individual switches with full length sliders. Make sure that you order the rotary fan control and not the slide fan control switch. In the spirit of full disclosure I have not fired-up the AC system yet. Having said that, based on previous experience I believe that Vintage Air has done a great job providing a terrific system with more than adequate documentation. I especially like the reduction in physical size and weight. I also like the electronic controls as opposed to mechanical – cable stretch and loose cable connections are a thing of the past. I appreciated being able to make my own compressor hoses (hope they are solid and do not leak). I do wish that they would come up with a universal compressor mount with an idler pulley. All in all, it is a great system. It takes a fair amount of time and effort to install, but I believe you will be happy with the result. I will try to answer any questions that you might have. Good Luck.
    1 point
  18. This is a real basic primer on how to bump out dents and shrink metal. Ok, if you're handy enough with an oxy-acetylene torch, then you'll be ok with this next procedure. If you're concerned with the "panel beaters", and I take that to mean the specialty hammers, dollys and other body specific tools, you can still do quite a bit with your regular tools. You can use your regular ball peen hammer or regular claw hammer as long as you're careful of the claw. See if you can address the metal from behind. Typically this will involve removing the lights, wiring and other trim pieces that will be in the way. Once done with that, take a good look at the metal. Remember, metal will stretch when dented, when you are pounding on the dent from the back side (inside of the car) you will also have to do a fair amount of pounding from the outside to restore the metal to the level required. If the metal has been stretched a bit, you have an acetylene torch, and you can do a fair amount of shrinking with the large heating tip, we called it a rose bloom but it's basically the one with many holes at the tip, used to heat large pieces of metal. The trick is to heat the stretched area till it's somewhat glowing, not orange but kind of reddish, then with a rag thoroughly soaked in water, you quench the metal. This causes the metal to shrink rapidly and will strengthen it in the process by hardening the metal. You have to be careful of the amount of steam that will be generated, so wear gloves. Don't over do this, cause you can over harden the metal and then it can become brittle. Remember, you're just trying to reverse the stretching caused by the impact. Without a shrinking hammer, this is the next best method. By the way a shrinking hammer should only be 10-20 dollars, it has what looks like a meat tenderizer face to it, you use it like a regular hammer, but you have a metal dolly behind it. By the way, if you have spare pieces of solid metal lying around, look at them, you may have the basics for a metal dolly, i.e. a piece of metal to both anvil against and also to act as a counter hammer to your striking hammer. The basic technique to pounding out the dents with a hammer is to use your dolly on the low side back side. That is, from the side that you are working on, find the deepest part of the dent, then from the other side (the side opposite you) put your dolly there and press outward or towards you. Then find the ripple in the metal out from that dent. This is the "rebound" dent. When metal gets hit, part of it sinks in, and the surrounding metal will bulge out. With your hammer now work around the dent, hitting the rebound part of the dent. If you work it properly, you'll slowly but surely see the rebound dent going down, and the deep dent coming out. You CAN use the dolly to smack against with the sheet metal between, but this is usually reserved for smaller dents where you can work faster that way. Just be careful with your fingers and don't get too crazy, you can thin out the metal that you're working on, and you'll end up with a washboard wobble, then you'll HAVE to shrink that metal. Once you've brought the majority of the dent out or all of it if you've been lucky enough all of it, then use your plastic body filler to finish the panel. If you should have a dent that is too deep to try to hammer out, you can use a slide hammer, or if you don't have one, get some sheet metal screws, drill a smallhole in the deepest part of the dent, and using pliers or some form of gripping the screw use it to pull the metal out, while again taping down on the rebound dent. I hope this helps, but I do caution you, I've summarized techniques that I'm sure others will say are too complex to be tried by the amateur as well as simplified some to basics that some may argue are too simplistic. Check your library, there should be some basic books on body working to help you. and an addendum: I'll add this to that, if you have access to an Eastwood catalog, they have an excellent tool that will help you do a quick job of shrinking metal. This is a hammer that has a rotating cam head with a spiral cut on it. As you hit, the cam rotates while grabbing the metal. I personally prefer the plain old shrinking hammer. This is one that looks like a meat tenderizer. This hammer in combination with a dolly is usually all you need to shrink most stretched out sheet metal. The prior post explains the basics, and it is tricky to explain WHERE on the panel to select where to shrink. The best I can do to explain that is as follows: Metal shrinking is present when you have a washboard effect on a panel. Washboarding is when you press on the panel, and you can feel and hear it go bonk and press in, when you release the panel it bonks again and pops out. The other obvious is when you have a panel and you can see the obvious BULGE of the metal above where you need it to be. To know where to shrink, try to find the one spot that is REALLY sensitive to push / pop. This is the sweet spot for THAT stretched out area. First use your shrinking hammer, and see what you can do to tighten up the metal with that. Put your dolly behind the metal, use your shrinking hammer, and smack the metal using the dolly to absorb the impact and accept the rebound. VERY IMPORTANT DO NOT LET THE DOLLY REBOUND ONTO THE METAL. This will tighten up that specific spot. Next, find the next sweet / soft spot. Usually as you tighten one area, you'll have another area become the sweet spot. Keep addressing the individual spots with the hammer / dolly combination. You will finally get to a point where no amount of beating will reduce the metal any more. At this point you switch to the acetylene torch. Heat the metal, again not red hot, just starting to glow, and wearing some thick gloves, and with a rag that's pretty well soaked and dripping with cool water, put your dolly behind the metal to support your pushing, push the wet rag onto the surface. The metal will cool very rapidly and shrink. Move to another spot and repeat. You'll do this pretty much all over the panel, and usually it's between the spots you treated earlier. Pretty soon the panel will feel tight and no washboarding will be felt or present. Check your panel for straightness and level to the surrounding metal. Use your dolly and regular hammer now to remove any last dents, etc, and you should be ready for your skin coat of bondo or lead. If you don't want to use lead or bondo, then you just need to continue to straighten and shrink the metal until the panel is to the shape desired. Most body men will just avoid this, since it is incredibly time intensive and expensive. It is best to get it so that you end up with the THINNEST possible coat of filler. But that's another posting.
    1 point
  19. I'm fairly picky about vintage calipers and how they should be treated, especially with some 40 years on the clock. I'll show what I think is right... it's not really that much beyond a standard rebuild once your in there. I'm fairly new to the site so I'm not sure if image tags will work etc. so bare with me as I figure it out. Looks like image tags aren't the answer. I'll include some pictures of the start. I think I'll make them a tad smaller so they don't take up so much room on the server. This will be a little clunky as I'll enter a few pictures at a time and discuss. Here's what we started with. The first thing to do is prep the caliper for complete disassembly. The pins come out and the dust boots come off. Once that is done we mount them in the vise and install a 10x1 nipple valve so the pump can do it's trick: Next we use a set of piston clamps to hold the outer piston in place while we use fluid to blow out the inner piston. There's a couple things at play here and I'll describe the tools and the purpose behind all of this. First off, let's go back to the 10x1 nipple valve and the "fluid" comment. I'm sure that most people reading along, who have rebuild calipers at one time or another have used the "pressurized air" method. You simply clamp off a piston and blow pressurized air into the caliper and "pop" out comes the piston. This will work on most calipers that have been working on the car. If the caliper or the car has sat for any length of time, the area above the bore seal will begin to contaminate with what I like to call "caliper shellac". This is a combination of rust and fluid that has passed the seal. This is what causes pistons to bind in the bore. Nearly 50% of the calipers we service will not come apart with air. Hence, a fluid is needed to push these pistons out. Fluid is safer as well. A piston letting go with compressed air has the velocity of a bullet coming out of a gun. This can damage your pistons and your caliper. With fluid they just "plop" out. Bottom line, fluids do not compress and they will do the work that air cannot in the case of a stubborn piston. Tools: I'll show what we're using and, in the case where there's a garage bench substitute, I'll pass that info and method along. In this post, the caliper clamp is nice but not always a necessity. You can get by with a small c-clamp holding one or both edges of the opposing piston. You just have to make sure they're not in the way of the other piston you're attempting to remove. Inner Piston: On most calipers I like to remove this piston first as it allows better clamping access to cover that bore. You'll see how this progresses. So here we'll hold the outer piston in place and use fluid to pump out the inner piston. In the 3rd picture you can see it coming out: Once the inner piston is out we need to seal up that bore and pump out the outer piston. To do that we use a fairly large rubber stopper and a steel plate. I use the vise to clamp the bottom of the plate with the caliper ears and a few c-clamps on the top to secure the rubber plug in the bore. If you don't have a large enough rubber plug, a large rubber washer and the steel plate will also work. For many of these pieces www.mcmaster.com is invaluable. Here are some shots of the cover in place in the piston removal: Next it's time to bust loose the 14mm M9 fasteners. These were in pretty tight so I used a longer breaker bar to get them started and then wrenched them out. Once they're apart we simply pick all of the seals out and remove the bore plug. These are now ready for plating: A word about plating (and yeah, I'm pretty anal about this stuff): We get this all the time; 1. Paint only protects the outside of the caliper... not very well and only temporarily. 2. Paint comes off with odd things like... brake fluid and brake cleaner. 3. Paint can actually encapsulate the caliper trapping in heat. 4. Zinc is the factory finish and has superior "sacrificial" corrosion protection. 5. Zinc re-plates the bore, which it probably needs it by now. Rebuilders that paint calipers do so because zinc is expensive. They can easily slap on a coat of paint on "in-house" and it speeds up the process. They can even call it cool things like "Ceramic" or "Polymer" etc. If you want your calipers done right they will need to be zinc coated like the day they left the ATE factory. So as you're reading along, I take it you've come to understand that I'm not a big fan of painting your calipers. True. In fact, I think it's one of the goofiest trends we've seen since Porsche put the first set of "Big Reds" on a car and others spray painted their way to glory. That said... to each his or her own. Plating at this stage of the game will probably take about 1 week out of your schedule and, if you look around you can probably get the whole shooting match done for around $50-60.00 bucks. This will ensure that your "vital" brake calipers will give you another 40 years of service. Off soapbox... Here's a shot off the units returned from plating: Oh Wait... Before that, I forgot to mention that we needed all new pistons for these beasts. I've yet to do enough Z caliper to know if this is common or not (Porsche S-Calipers are the worst for this) but these were trashed. The new units look great and are in these pics as well. Let's get this party started. Next we start the fun process of putting it all back together. This starts with seals and dust boots. For the seals, I like to just walk them around in the groove and push the final bit into place. An angled dental pick can help if it gets a little twisted. Just run it through the groove and the seal will usually sort itself out. For the dust boots, I like to install these before you put the pistons in. This may seem obvious but, I've had the question arise. I also go around and tug the edges and look at the seal to the piston from the bottom to make sure they're seated properly. Big Derpy-Der Moment: I just realized that we didn't get any pictures of the pistons going in with the Arbor Press. I'll do my best do describer here but, it's pretty straightforward with these: 1. Get "Brake Caliper Assembly Lube". Other assembly lubes can swell your new seals and ruin your calipers. PEP Boys has it in single use tubes. We use the ATE assembly lube. I like to put a dab about the size of my thumbnail inside the bore and spread it around with an applicator brush. You can use a finger as well, just make sure it's evenly spread around the bore. 2. Simply press in the piston. I put both thumbs in and push down. It "should" slide paste the seal and drop right in. If not, a little persuasion from the arbor press is all that's needed. If you don't have a bench top press, a socket dropped into the piston cavity and a vise will suffice. 3. Once the pistons are in, make sure you wrap the wire dust boot clip over the top of the dust boot to secure it in place and keep water from getting in. Do this before you bolt them together and it's much easier. Once the pistons are in place, install the rubber caliper 1/2 seals and drop your fasteners into the back 1/2 of the caliper. Hold the front half in one hand and pickup the back 1/2 in the other and drop the back 1/2 down onto the fronts with the new seals in place. I like to have a 3" extension loaded with a 14mm socket handy at this point as the process of screwing the caliper 1/2's together begins now: Well... this pretty much wraps it up: Once the calipers have been hand tightened (this is a great time to align the 1/2's before torquing them down), it's time to take them over to the bench. We protect the plating in the vise and begin the torquing process. These fasteners are M9 so I like to use a final torque of 29ftlbs. Here's the sequence: Number the bolts from left to right 1-2-3-4. Torque as follows first: 10-14ftlbs. 2-3-1-4 Next, go to final torque: 29ftlbs. 2-3-1-4 Once the caliper 1/2's are put together you should have some new calipers on your hands. Install bleeders, pads, pins and clips and you'll be back in business. A word about your new calipers and your new pads: 1. New calipers have new seals. These new seals will tend to pull your pistons back off the pad/rotor more aggressively than old seals. This means you will have a soft pedal for a while until your seals break in. Use the proper bedding procedure for your pads and it will help break in your seals. Your pedal will eventually begin to come back up as your seals break in. 2. New pads should not squeak or squeal if they are bedded properly. There are also pads designed not to squeal but they also have the bad habit of not stopping as well as the proper pads. Rob mentioned the Porterfield pads early on. These are our favorite for both stopping power and modulation. These are an extremely predictable pad and they will easily out stop compounds of the era. Great investment for anyone thinking of "upgrading". Again, following proper bedding procedures will ensure your pads not only work well but work quietly. I hope this helps! I'm a car guy so I love to see people dig in and get it done (the proper way) no matter what the make and model. Feel free to ask any questions about areas I may have missed. Yes, they're a tad different from your average mass rebuilder. We get that a lot too: 1. Those things cost those vendors $35.00 each. They're pushing them because there's big money to be made off you. 2. The caliper bodies are vibratory tumble polished. They put them in a huge bin of media and polish all of the finish off them. Then they get an oil bath. That's it! There is "no" protective finish on them at all! Give it a few years and your bargin calipers will literally be covered with rust. We've seen hundreds of them. The ones that come from the big-box rebuilders are almost unusable in a few short years. 3. We've seen pistons in backward. We've seen two different spacers installed on one caliper. We've seen handbrake arms on various other caliper types installed backward. 4. Their fasteners (the things that literally hold your brake calipers together!) get the same oil treatment. They begin to rust within a few short years. We've had some stick inside the calipers as we attempt to tear them down. The real benifits of zinc is the sacrificial coating properties. Zinc, by nature, will attract oxidents and literally save the metal it is protecting. Even if it is scratched off the zinc will continue to protect the steel it encapsulates. We've restored 46 year old calipers and have them come out looking brand new. All thanks to the protective properties of the zinc coating applied those many years back. Zinc also helps protect your piston bore. While the bore is not a sealing surface, it can get wear from the piston. Wear, lack of fluid changes and rusty caliper shellac will cause a caliper to stick. This usually happens just above the seal where moisture can get in. Other rebuilders use a hone to clean out your caliper bore. We recommend against that as it leaves a fresh steel on steel surface (bore and piston). The zinc bath leaves a perfect factory finish on the inside of your caliper bore. All in all, the process will clean and replate the entire caliper and make everything good for another 30-40 years. I'm a real advocate of having your calipers replated... obviously. I don't want to get into the costs here because the intent was not to turn this into a SPAM thread rather than a helpful how-to. That's basic "yellow" zinc as they call it in that industry. There is; yellow, clear (silver) and black as the three most common. Most of our fasteners are done in black but these were yellow. Sheen is determined by many things, metal prep and how long they're left in the dichromate (which is the final stage that makes them yellow in appearance). The metal on these calipers was very good hence the finish we got on them. Check out the last few style shots I took for the web. Rob is right, they look even better in person. Westpak - Thanks. Again, as I mentioned in the first post, it really isn't too much different than a standard rebuild. I really want to encourage people to get to know their local platers though. Be careful though... vintage car guys going to a metal plater can be detrimental to your marriage and your bank account! Adam - You are forgiven. There's still time. About Porterfields. I'm a big fan and have them on all my P-Cars, even the Pig (AKA Cayenne). Here's my take on those... there are $25.00 pads and $125 pads, the Porterfields act like the $125 pads for about 1/2 the price. I like the R4-S (as in street/autocross) compound as they modulate like a dream and are extremely quiet if bedded properly. Here's some info on the compound: http://porterfield-brakes.com/images/portstrt2008_11_06_02_45_30.pdf Fronts are AP114. Rears are Shoe411.
    1 point
  20. I am posting some photos of part details as I restore. Hopefully they can be of use in the future.I painted the light compartment white to improve output.Heat Shield (seems like engineering correction to alleviate melting plastic)7.5WRetaining nut in place.Light leak at top edge. Gasket does not seal.
    1 point
  21. Tired of the old SLOW and Tired wipers on your 240Z? Ya, Me too. SO I did some research on the subject over at HybridZ and found that for a few years now, people have been trying to use the 94' Accord and 91' Civic wiper motors as a replacement to the Datsun wiper motor that ONLY like to move if the window is WET... So I read every thread and post on the subject to find out as much as possible. All I found was pictures and posts by people saying that "it works great BUT..... The wiper does'nt PARK when you turn the switch to OFF. You have to shut the wiper switch off at the EXACT moment to get the blades to sit in the usual DOWN position. 00:00 Loading ad 00:00 So I went to the junk yard and pulled a 91' Honda Civic wiper motor, brought it home and tore the gear/contact cover off to find what made it click and Also to find why nobody, after 4 years, could get the wiper to "PARK" I wrote everything down that I saw, put it back together and studied the their wiring diagrams and my diagrams. So I wire up the wiper the way everyone else had been doing it for a few years and started tesing each and every wire. I discovered what they had missed and decided to wire up a relay, the way I thought it should be, to get the wipers to "PARK" and then gave it some power. Slow speed worked great, high speed worked even better. So I kicked it back down to slow then crossed my fingers and turn the switch off. It spun a little before the relay kicked in, then it finished it's rotation and stopped exactly where it should have. So I did it a bunch of times and it stopped in the exact same spot every time. So in other words, I seem to have fixed the problem that plagued people who have done the conversion before. Below is everything you'll need to know about putting in a 91' Honda Civic wiper motor into your 240Z. I've done the conversion and it's FRICKEN AWESOME!!! The first time I tried the wipers was in my garage on a DRY window with NEW wiper blades. I made a video of it for any unbelievers and also to show how the OFF position Parks the blades at the end of the rotation. So here's some more good news, the Datsun wiper motor mounting screws work on the Honda motor AND the Datsun wiper arm bracket will slide right onto the Honda motor shaft without modification. When you go to the Pull-A-Part, SAVE THE BOLTS and the NUT & WASHER. If you buy the motor at the Auto Parts Store, it will NOT normally come with bolts or the bracket mounting nut. Here is the Short list of needed items....... 1) 91' Honda wiper motor (make sure to unplug the motor and also remove the female end from the honda with at least 6 to 8 inches of wire past the female plug, you'll need the female end if you wanna make a custom adaptor type harness) I paid $6.50 at the local Pull-A-Part, Schucks Auto Supply wanted about $100. Go Used. 1) 20/30 amp 12 volt relay from the auto parts store (usually about $5.00) 1) 6-terminal Datsun Plug (exactly like the one on your Datsun wiper motor, or Voltage regulator or pre 3/73' Combo switch on the harness side. I sell these and the terminals if you would like to make a brand new adaptor for your conversion The other possibility is to Cut off your plug and wires from your Datsun Wiper motor, it's up to you. You can even Hard wire the Honda motor in if you'd like. 70' Datsun 240Z __________________ 91' Honda civic wiper motor blue/white-------pin 86 ________ Pin 87A-------blue/white blue-------------pin 87 ________ pin 30--------blue Blue/red-----------pin 85-------pin 85----------green/black Black----------------------to------------------black Blue/yellow----------------to-------------------blue/yellow ________________________________________________________ Here are the pics for drilling the Datsun wiper Plate, notching the plate to seat the Honda motor correctly, and that's it. 5 small cuts, 3 small holes. If you have any questions and don't mind reading alot more, check out this link for every single detail. http://forums.hybridz.org/showthread.php?t=82292 After the New Honda Motor is installed in your Z, turn the wipers on once or twice to 1) Make sure the motor is working correctly and running and 2) to Park the wiper studs in the right position before installing the wiper blades. Feel free to ask questions here, post results, share added info (other years and models of Honda wiper motors that are identical etc.) Dave. Datsun to Honda wiper diagram.bmp
    1 point
  22. As part of the slow refresh of my red '71 240Z I knew I needed to replace all the fuel hoses, especially the big ones that go to the expansion tank in the right rear quarter panel. I'd read all the instructions for saving money by using generic fuel-rated hose and inserting sleeves in them to keep them from kinking and such. But since I am more than a little reluctant to pollute my red car's originality, and also because I really didn't feel like messing with bending and inserting sleeves, I decided to bite the bullet and buy factory hoses. As a side benefit, I figured I could advise others on whether this was as good an idea as it seemed to me at the time. So now that it is done, here are the part numbers I used, and my comments. I got mine at club discount from my local dealer, but your dealer may not offer that. So I included prices from NissanParts.cc for comparison. (Prices current as of 1 May 2007.) 17239-E4601, $27.15. Smaller diameter hose, runs from expansion tank to top right side of the fuel tank. About 3 feet long. Has a preformed double bend at the tank end. This hose is apparently actually correct for '73 240Z, but works OK on '70-72 cars as well. (Correct '70-72 hose is NLA.) The double bend is not quite the same as the one that was on my car, but once pulled into place seemed to work well. Arne's advice - RECOMMENDED, but not absolutely required - The preformed bends do help for this hose. You might be able to get by with generic for this one, but the bend at the tank end might kink some on generic hose. Since this one is affordable, I'd do it. 17235-E4601, $53.20. Large diameter hose with several preformed bends, including a 180 degree bend at the tank end. About 4 feet long. Goes from the expansion tank through the floor to the back of the fuel tank on the right side. Correct for '70-73, fits perfectly. Arne's advice - HIGHLY RECOMMENDED - You need that 180 but would need to sleeve a generic hose to do it. The price of this hose is not that bad considering the three custom bends. Buy it. 17238-E4602, NLA as of 9/09. Large diameter horseshoe shaped hose, less than 2 feet long. Runs from expansion tank to fitting on filler neck. Correct for '70-73. Fits fine. Arne's advice - SOMEWHAT RECOMMENDED, not absolutely required - You can do this one fairly easily with generic, especially if you used a slightly longer hose than normal so that the bend was gentle. And no that it's NLA, you'll probably have to... 17236-E4601, $88.43. Medium diameter long hose. About 6, maybe 7 feet long. No bends at all. Runs from left side of tank up through the floor, across and into the bottom of the expansion tank. Correct for '70-73. Fits fine. Arne's advice - NOT RECOMMENDED - Unless you are a fetishist about original parts, use generic here. This is the most expensive hose from Nissan, but it has NO preformed bends. So there's no advantage to the factory hose on this one. I also used 18" of 3/16" ID fuel hose (return line), 18" of 5/16" ID fuel hose (fuel supply line), and 4 feet of 1/4" ID fuel hose (evap tank to flow valve line) to do all the other hoses there while the tank was out. In addition, I got replacement grommets and hose sealing sleeves from Banzai. The hose sleeves could be replaced with heat shrink, but I felt the real thing wasn't all that expensive. My grommets were still soft, but the replacement hose from the top of the expansion tank to the metal line that goes to the flow valve on the left front inner fender (the 4 feet of 1/4" hose) was a smaller external diameter than stock. One of the grommets I got from Banzai was apparently intended to deal with this difference and worked great at that spot. Anyway, the deed is done. For myself, I'm not sorry that for the red car I bought the long one from Nissan, but for my yellow car I would not have bought that expensive one. I think it worked, the garage does not have that faint gas odor tonight, so I'm happy.
    1 point

Announcements



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.