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Captain Obvious

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Everything posted by Captain Obvious

  1. When you remove that resistor from the harness, you completely separate the tach from the ignition circuit. With that resistor out, the RPM input signal to the tach is open circuited. That's why the tach didn't work at all when you pulled that resistor. That said though... It really is important that the original ignition module be disconnected, so double check just to be sure.
  2. Ferg, Did it look "stock-ish"? I've always thought of putting a switch there, but I've never seen anything that looked like it really belonged. I want something that looks like it could have come from the factory.
  3. Your switches look good. I haven't finalized my situation, but I'll try to snap a couple pics when I get the chance. I warn you though... It's going to raise some questions.
  4. (I think the reason Dave asked is that) sometimes the shift knob can amplify vibrations and make a buzzy noise. You can check if it's part of the problem by simply unscrewing it and seeing what (if anything) happens to the noise.
  5. Here's a thread with some stuff that might help. https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/57671-electric-servos-instead-of-vacuum-driven-hvac/ The pics are dead, but if there's something you want, let me know.
  6. Glad to help. I don't think you'll crack any plastics taking that panel out. The more risky maneuver is putting it back in. Don't torque the mounting screws too tight. I've seen a couple of those panels with cracks radiating out from the mounting screw holes due to being tightened too much.
  7. The map light is replaced from the back side of the vent panel. Four screws to take the panel off and then the bulb goes into the lamp from the rear. I think they may have changed some of the details over the years from 74 to the end, but here's a pic that should help. This is the back side of that map light panel:
  8. LOL!! Again? Haha!! Here's the (in)famous @Mike W and @GGRIII looking over GGR's first place winning 260Z. Yes... Gary's 260 beat out Mike's 260 for the first place spot. And nobody can convince me that it was as simple as the fact that Mike's beautiful Gold Cup Z was tucked safely parked inside one of the special display buildings (and most people didn't even know it was supposed to be considered for judging?). Veni, vidi, vici Oh, and I did mention that Mike has a beautiful 260 as well, right?
  9. I think I'm headed out there tomorrow. Hope the weather holds!!
  10. Haha!! Probably not, but of all the stupid stuff I do, I'm less worried about those dollies than the rest of the stupid stuff. And the rating on the small moving dollies is 1000 pounds each. Now I don't trust the absolute validity of that rating, but it's about twice what you would be putting on it with a corner of the Z. So there is a significant overrating.
  11. I have a pair of the vehicle dollies as well, but no... They do not raise the car nearly as high as the moving dollies with a couple slabs of wood on top. And... I'm not sure which moving dollies you were looking at, but the small ones are currently $26 for a pair while a pair of those vehicle dollies you linked to are sixty bucks. So if you want them on all four corners, you can get four of the moving dollies for less than one pair of the vehicle versions. I also found that the moving dollies roll much easier than the vehicle dollies. Not sure why, but they just move a lot easier.
  12. I jacked mine up and then set it back down on four small moving dollies (from HF). Lifts the car up high enough to be able to get under it and also allows the suspension to squirm around to neutral position which is important when tightening the suspension bolts. Put a plank or two of 2 x 10 across these: Don't let your car roll out into the street on the dollies.
  13. Yes, those hoses are full of coolant and will gush some when you take them off. With that in mind, I would drain the coolant first to minimize the mess. There will still be some coolant coming out of the tubes even after draining the system, but probably less than if you didn't drain the system first. Oh... And when you're all done with the coolant leak repair, I would disconnect the electrical connectors that go to the center console and clean them out. It's common for those connectors to be green crusty corroded due to heater system leaks over the years getting inside the contacts and sitting wet and festering.
  14. Well before you go bending stuff, I think it would be important to know if someone had been in there before messing around. Can you / could you tell if someone had been into the AFM before you?
  15. That orange module is the temperature control switch for your A/C compressor. The temp silder lever on the HVAC control panel does one of two things: When you are in non-A/C mode, the temp lever controls the amount of water flowing through the water cokk. But when you are in A/C mode, the system automatically cuts off all water to the heater core using the vacuum controlled valve that lives near the water cokk. So when you're in A/C mode, no water flows through the core regardless of where the lever is. And then in that A/C mode, they instead use the slider lever to control the setpoint for that orange device. That orange cube is a temperature controlled switch with a sensor stuck in the evaporator coil. If the evaporator warms up enough, they turn the compressor on. And if the evaporator cools off enough, they cut off power to the compressor. Basically, they cycle the compressor and the duty cycle is dependent on the position of the temperature slider lever. TMI?
  16. You probably already know this, but the car in your pic above is a 77, not a 75. I don't know if the over rider bars are the same between those years. But if I had to guess..... I kinda doubt it?
  17. Was there a little fondling maybe?
  18. Some ideas: https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/44553-help-me-understand-the-aar-please/ https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/50310-a-better-auxilary-air-regulator/
  19. Electrically that two gang switch you bought will be great. It will all come down to how well you can get it to fit. If necessary, you could cut the four retaining tabs off the back of that stitch assy if it helps it fit in the hole better. You would have to figure out a different way to keep it in place, but making it look good from the top side is the most important. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.
  20. Cool. If you're already just controlling a relay, then a 260/280 stock defog switch will work fine. As for where to put it.... I've been messing with the same thing in recent weeks and I've tried several different configurations. I recently made an adapter plate to put one of those switches in that rightmost larger hole. But the simplest thing would be to put it horizontal in one of the two positions right below the radio. If you've got a 260, then your right side is the "CHOKE" light, and the left side is your "REAR REFOGGER" location. Maybe you could live without a defogger iindicator lamp there and use that location for your fog light switch? You still need CHOKE, but maybe you could do without the DEFOG indicator. And when I get a chance I'll take some pics of some of the other stuff I've been messing with. One of my "and after a completely unprofitable amount of hours later, I have this" kind of things.
  21. The defogger switch is just a normal SPST switch, so that part of it is no problem. No resistors or anything else unusual. Just a switch. The only thing that would concern me is how much current can that defog switch deal with? I don't think I would want fog light current going directly through that switch. I'd want to use a relay between the switch and the lights.
  22. Pics or it didn't happen.
  23. I cry foul for using the GPS system to show upcoming features on the track.
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