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CW240Z72

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CW240Z72 last won the day on February 2

CW240Z72 had the most liked content!

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About CW240Z72

  • Rank
    Active Member

Contact

  • Map Location
    Denton, TX
  • Occupation
    Design Engineer

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
  • About my Cars
    1971 240Z
    1972 240Z
    1972 510 (sold)
    1975 280Z (sold)
    1976 620

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  1. That’s a great question. I honestly do not know of when the transition happened. What’s odd is my original 75 280Z had a pointed tip on the antenna. For the late 71/72 cars, I have seen both. I suspect the change happened then, or it was a frequently replaced item with aftermarket units.
  2. Rebuilding the factory antenna. The mast was broken on this Z when we got it, but fortunately the remains were left in the car. Tore the unit down and determined the motor was beyond repair. Luckily I have three other complete units (also with broken masts) to use as donors. Pulled two assemblies apart to build one functional unit. I also have 3 NOS series 2 masts on hand. With the only physical difference I could see between the two was the end tip, I was able to unthread the pointed tip off the original, and create a “series 1” antenna out of the later one. Rebuilt, greased, and tested, it’s ready for install once I can locate another 2 piece bulkhead assembly that fastens the antenna to the body.
  3. I am finally uncovered from 4” of snow here in north TX. Been an absolute roller coaster for us southerners more accustomed to 105 F temps, not -5 F. Hopefully late spring/early summer I will have the Z road worthy. Been itching to get back to car shows and sync up with other Z folks in person. Also debating on making the hike to ZCON this year with the Z.
  4. Few updates on the Z. Tonight’s progress includes mounting the rebuilt pedal box assembly, brake booster, master cylinders, and last of the hard lines.
  5. Welcome anytime. Right now I am using the holes previously drilled into the firewall for the AC lines. I’m using the same evaporator that came out of the car, since whoever installed this system previously did a good job routing the lines. Of course, the lines that came in the kit I bought are too short, but you can get an idea for how they’ll look once installed. I’ll add edge trim on some of the battery tray flanges prevent rubbing too.
  6. $200-$300 will get you setup with a quality printer with a print size in the 200 mm x 200 mm x 250 mm range. For me that’s perfect for what I use it for. Prototyping mounting brackets, small NLA trim pieces, emblems, you name it. I’ve also printed larger pieces in sections, then glued them together. My 72 Z I am printing a center bezel for the dash to house the Vintage Air controls and my Haltech keypad. I don’t like the aluminum delete panel look, and this will have the shape of the stock bezel but fit the new controls. You can glue, body work, and paint the pieces to form very strong and seamless parts.
  7. That’s correct. There are a few variables that can alter the print quality, but the individual layering will always be visible.
  8. Close ups of the prototype routing aid. I’m by no means an expert when it comes to printing, but I feel these will be very presentable once installed.
  9. In the middle of sub 10 F temperatures, been working on the routings for the AC hoses. Being one of the very few things on the car that's not original, I wanted to do the AC installation with as few permanent cut ups to the car as possible. I plan on routing the hoses down the passenger frame rail so that they'll be tucked away and not as much of an eye sore as the dealer setup was previously. To do this, I created these mounting saddles that I can zip tie over the electrical harness, and will also saddle each of the lines. 3D printed two to rough-in the concept. I think it'll work out nicely with a few more.
  10. Back under the Z, the half shafts were next up for a tear down and rebuild. Not a difficult job to do, but one you need to keep in mind the reassembly order and orientation of hardware.
  11. Engine bay harness refresh completed tonight. We’ll get this routed and be one step closer to installing the drivetrain.
  12. Differential made it in tonight. Next we need to get the suspension loaded so we can torque everything down under load.
  13. Acetone and a good amount of elbow grease.
  14. With one order I should have almost everything to restore the harness on this Z. Most of the work done on the harness was purely from an aesthetic standpoint, removing tired old connectors and replacing them with clean ones. We got lucky that no one decided to hack into the wiring of this car much previously. Here’s a quick before and after The harness tape they sell is nice. OEM grade, and slightly thinner than what you can find at the auto parts store.
  15. Thank you @Diseazd. I have always admired your Z car collection, fantastic line up. May have my wires crossed, but is your (maybe?) son building up a NA RB Z31? Kinda in a Safari Gold color? To me sitting is the worst thing someone can do to a car, but I agree, when you put a lot of time, effort, and $$$ in something it's hard to drive it without cringing about the wear and tear it'll inevitably get. At the rate these Z cars are going in the eyes of collectors, maybe it's not a bad thing to have both your driver's cars and minty showroom examples to admire. My '72 will be on the other side of the spectrum as this Z. RB25 running off of just about everything Haltech has to offer. It's a clean bodied Z but one I don't have to dodge water puddles in.
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