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jfa.series1

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jfa.series1 last won the day on August 2

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About jfa.series1

  • Rank
    Just Another Jim

Contact

  • Map Location
    Richardson TX
  • Occupation
    Retired from retail information technology

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
  • About my Cars
    Original owner of HLS30-15320, 12/1970. Complete restoration with mild customizations completed September 2011.

Zcar VIN Registry

  • Zcar 1 VIN
    HLS30-15320

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. What grannyknot said. Another way to loosen them up is to get them out in the bright sun for a couple of hours. Another tip: turn the seat back cover inside out and roll it down over the foam and frame, don't pull it down.
  2. These cylinders "float" or slide when the piston expands, its good to apply some grease to that area when installing.
  3. Overall the lines are very clean and Nissan certainly avoided the Supra's wretched excess of bulges, bends, and faux scoops and vents. If Nissan really wants to pay homage to the S30 line, the gaping maw of a grill has to go - it needs to be a substantially broader and flatter rectangle. To me the hood screams Chevy Camaro, nothing elegant about it. Expand the headlights to more resemble the sugar scoops (yes, keep then covered). Open up the quarter lights by eliminating the sharp break upwards and continuing the door line (ala S30). The rear end is a bit soft on the lines, could use a more crisp definition. Overall, too much 370Z carryover.
  4. Fortunately for me, when I did my resto 10 years ago I could still get the early versions. So... no I've not used them.
  5. Check these out on ebay: Dorman W96879 (R) & Dorman W96878 (L), say they fit the 72-73 models.
  6. Here is a Tokico HP with the replacement KONI - noticeably different bottom configuration, looks somewhat similar to the one in madkaw's second pic. The chipped paint on the KONI is from interference with the strut bottom.
  7. As the owner of a sailboat for over 20 years, one quickly learns how to correctly deal with stainless steel fasteners. From the book "Lessons Learned at Mother's Knee", not just any old lube will work with SS - it needs to be an anti-seize lube that resists the thread-to-thread pressure that will displace ordinary lubes. I have one container that has copper as a component. The SS fittings on our hydraulic lines will always benefit from some anti-seize. While installing my KONI's I noted a light colored lube on the threads, possibly a lithium type lube. And yes... slow and easy is the technique.
  8. Thanks for your interest. It was sold a few weeks ago.
  9. Hey Ryan, Welcome to the group officially now that you have emerged from lurker status! That looks like a great project and it will be fun to see your progress. Your Dad's new shop looks to be well worth the wait. Sweet video, I wish I had some of your talent in this area - we'll all be watching for your future episodes. Your plan for the car is impressive and I think you'll find some like-minded 920 Safari Gold bigots (like me) on this site. A few years ago I sold a restored steering wheel to a chap in Perth. He commented it is the most isolated city in the world! Regards, Jim
  10. Glad all went well with the badges. Regarding the "original" look - you do know that side moldings were dealer add-ons, right? Not offered by Nissan from the factory. Anyway, installing pop-rivets should be pretty straightforward, probably go with aluminum rivets as opposed to steel. A pop-rivet tool should be available most anywhere, very inexpensive.
  11. Welcome to the group, lots of quality help here for all models. The fender badges can likely be pushed out from the backside and if you are really creative you can possibly do the same for the hatch badges by removing the inner panel. You seem to be on track with the side moldings and installing new pop-rivets after the paint job should not be difficult. This is a good time to consider whether you want to stick with the side moldings - if not, ideal time to get the painter to have the holes closed. The badges aft of the quarter windows will have to be pried off, just go slowly and don't try to do it with one bite. Look at some pics of badges on ebay to get a feel for what they look like on the back side and where the pins are located. The more you remove (such as door and hatch locks), the better quality potential for the paint job.
  12. The control arm bushing may be totally shot allowing the arm to move outboard under load.
  13. After I swabbed out the oil I could see the shoulder with a flashlight and feel it with a long tool. No fiber optic tool so no pics. Now its all back together and on to the other side. Might or might not find the same situation.
  14. A very big thanks for outstanding customer service from MSA and KONI! Like a few others, I could not get the gland nut to adequately thread into place because the shock was not seating properly. My struts are squeaky clean inside with no foreign debris. As recommended above, I contacted MSA about the issue. @Joseph@TheZStore quickly responded and identified a Nissan mfg. anomaly where the bottom cap on the strut has an internal shoulder. Chipped paint on the bottom of the new KONI shock confirmed the interference. MSA had modified gland nuts on hand for this problem and sent a pair to me at no cost. Note the machined internal relief shoulder on the gland nut on the right vs. stock on the left. The relief allowed the gland nut threads to fully engage and get the gap well under 4mm. One front strut down this morning, one to go for tomorrow and then on to the rears. Jim
  15. The factory method of securing the top of the rear finisher panels to the hatch sill is with a set of plastic rivets that are a bit smaller than those used for the interior panels. I've seen them secured with pop-rivets and screws. The small rivets are available thru Nissan parts, possibly MSA.
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