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jfa.series1

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jfa.series1 last won the day on March 29

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About jfa.series1

  • Rank
    Just Another Jim

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  • Map Location
    Richardson TX
  • Occupation
    Retired from retail information technology

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
  • About my Cars
    Original owner of HLS30-15320, 12/1970. Complete restoration with mild customizations completed September 2011.

Zcar VIN Registry

  • Zcar 1 VIN
    HLS30-15320

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  1. Yep, seems redundant to me as well. But... I 'm not a Nissan engineer in 1969 trying to get on top of emissions.
  2. There is a check valve in the body of the flow guide. The arrow on the bottom right should be reversed, flow is from the block to the valve. So... you have two inlets (tank and block) and one outlet to the air filter.
  3. Great pics of what you found. I suspect the oil breather pipe from your L24 would fit the new L28 and allow you to retain the flow guide valve piping. If not, you could cap the one inlet nozzle on the flow guide valve to retain the one from the fuel tank. BTW - hold on to all those little OE spring clamps and refinish them in satin black for originality.
  4. Excellent details in this thread:
  5. @SteveJ has it right. The hard line comes up on top of the left frame rail and connects via a rubber line to the flow guide valve. This valve is a small aluminum casting mounted under the ballast resistor. You can see the hard line and valve not yet connected in this pic. As to the purpose, the valve routes fuel tank vapors and oil pan vapors to the back of the air filter box so they can be pulled into the carbs and burned.
  6. Oh heck yeah, lots of prep work: Thoroughly clean both sides of the panels, fix any bends/dents/dings - sometimes requires multiple passes of filler primer and wet sanding, polish the stainless steel bezels, tape the front sides of the bezels. If the back sides have any surface rust: remove rust with light sanding, tape back sides of bezels, primer the back sides. No sanding on the front sides until the bezels are taped and protected. Wet sand front sides, primer paint, wet sand primer, repeat as needed, color coat paint, wet sand, usually repeat at least once, apply clear coat, very
  7. The hub should not require any special care or treatment. Remove the horn elements and set them aside for a good cleaning. Strip and clean the spokes and hub for your paint prep. I found that refinishing the rim before painting the spokes and hub worked best for me. This is a fun and satisfying project, looking forward to your results.
  8. Here's a couple of close-up pics of my wheel in process some years ago, one with it stripped and one with it stained and topped with a coat of clear lacquer. The preferred clear coat today is usually spray polyurethane. I used a hand-rubbed oil base stain.
  9. View Advert Restored 240Z Tail Light Panels Up for sale is the last set of 240Z tail light panels I expect to complete. They have been restored to the OE color and finish. The stainless steel bezels have been polished to a chrome-like shine and are free of dings or scratches. The back sides have been thoroughly cleaned, any traces of surface rust removed, and sealed with a fresh coat of primer. I’ve included a pic of a set I recently completed and installed on my car with the license light refinished to match. Also available (not pictured) is a matching res
  10. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Up for sale is the last set of 240Z tail light panels I expect to complete. They have been restored to the OE color and finish. The stainless steel bezels have been polished to a chrome-like shine and are free of dings or scratches. The back sides have been thoroughly cleaned, any traces of surface rust removed, and sealed with a fresh coat of primer. I’ve included a pic of a set I recently completed and installed on my car with the license light refinished to match. Also available (not pictured) is a matching restored grill for a ’72-73 240Z. It was completely disassembled, parts straightened/repaired/replaced as required, stripped to bare metal and refinished. This grill will fit a ’69-71 Z if the lower/outer brackets are swapped out. The tail light panels are $295 including standard domestic shipping. The matching grill is $315 including standard domestic shipping. A 10% discount is available if both parts are purchased together. Payment via PayPal, PM if interested. Thanks!

    $295

  11. Remove the hatch strut from the bracket, prop the hatch open. The bracket is welded in place, leave it alone. Get the foot of the panel in place and very gently bend the panel to get it past the bracket.
  12. If you are sure you have located the correct fuse the next step will be to see if battery power is coming into that fuse. If so, then check that you have continuity from the other end of the fuse to one of the wires at the door switch.
  13. I'm going to do my best to respond to your post and not get you pi$$ed off. You've probably noticed that you're not getting responses to this thread and are getting frustrated. There are at least two reasons for no responses: (1) it seems you are ignoring the help offered last week in your prior post, (2) you are trying to fight/hack the factory wiring instead of tracing and fixing the problem. There is NO need to ground any wire at a door switch - all of the grounds are in place at their proper location! There is one wire to each of the the door switches that should have constant power.
  14. The power wire should be live all the time so that the dome light comes when either door is opened.
  15. The switch is not grounded to the frame. One of the three wires is providing power, the other two wires go to (1) the warning buzzer that the key is in the ignition and (2) the dome light. Putting all three wires together will defeat the switch - the buzzer and light will always be activated.
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