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  2. I have spark thru the coil now. NO gas coming from the fuel filter. ideas experts?
  3. View Advert 1974 Datsun 260Z Air Pump Used air pump from my Datsun 260Z (1974), includes the belt and brackets. The pullet does spin without binding or abnormal sounds, however I imagine it will need a rebuild for assurance before constant use. Removed most of the EGR components from this car as the rebuild will not include these items. Sixty five ($65), buyer to pay shipping. Advertiser Tyler Date 10/01/2020 Price $65.00 Category Parts for Sale  
  4. What a great question! It stops moving when you thwack a big socket on the back of it ;) If you are paranoid about it, you can always trim the first 1-2 mm off the grease seal with a sharp blade as it is very soft and as far as I could see wasn’t doing a great deal! I did this on the second side I did.
  5. Today
  6. Hi guys... what do you think of the dimensions of this profile.. is that similar to the Kia one ? my seals were toast when I got the car so dont have anything to compare to
  7. Happy to add my 2 cents, especially since I've been asked to join in. I read this thread last night and was trying to make sense of it. @Sean Dezart - You messaged me about posting these wheels on my own forum (www.viczcar.com). But before I gave you the go ahead, I wanted to know more about these wheels and the product before giving you the go ahead for several reasons. I recall seeing someone in Eastern Europe offering the M-speed style wheels for literally half the price of what M-speed were charging elsewhere. Naturally this seemed too good to be true. Subsequently there was discussion around the person offering these wheels and how they were so cheap? From what I could ascertain before the listings were removed from Marketplace is that they were squirrelled out of the backdoor of the same factory M-speed had commissioned to cast them in China. Bypassing M-speed who had done all the ground work in bringing them to market. You started offering the style of wheels (The Kobe Seiko Rally Mags (wide) and 432 spec (narrow)) a few weeks later. I asked you if you had gone to the effort of reproducing the wheels or if they were M-speed and you were distributing for them, but I didn't get a clear answer. This photo of the "Made in" and the rest appears ground off.. https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/64479-parts-for-sale-4x-reproduction-nissan-fairlady-z432-wheels-in-aluminum/?do=findComment&comment=606678 To me it looks like you're trying to obfuscate where they have come from or who made them for that matter, but why do that? Anyway, why does it matter where they came from or where they are made? Simple, M-speed spent a lot of money, time and R&D to bring these wheels to market, so whatever price they charge is their business and they should be able to charge whatever price they want. The market will tell them if it's too expensive or not. If you were to commission the same wheels, do the same R&D and decide to offer them at half the price of M-speed, that would be fair. Nobody would be complaining. But what you're doing is taking the hard work and capital that M-speed has kicked into this project and undercut them, but this also creates another downstream problem. Determining which wheels are from M-speed and which ones are posing as M-Speed. It may also deter companies like M-speed from doing similar projects in future as a result and as a community we all lose out when that happens. Q. How do you know the ones sold to you direct from the factory are of the same quality as the ones M-speed is selling? Has it not occurred to you that M-speed may have many batches of wheels sent to them for testing before selling them to the wider market and a bunch of those wheels may be discarded after QC because of the Chinese attitude of "Cha Bu Duo"? Or that the wheels commissioned by M-speed must be done to a higher standard and strength and materials (alloys used must be higher quality), and since they are charing M-speed more for this standard that's fine, but if they are selling them out the back door or via Alibaba marketplace then just Cha Bu Duo will do? Example of wheel testing in Japan on Weds Wheels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJeFB6SRslk This is why I have concerns about the wheels myself, since I'm not sure what testing has been done and if you are checking any of these wheels yourself for quality and standards. Let's face it the people who want these wheels are probably looking to mount them on cars they have invested a lot of money into and the last thing they want when driving at 100km/h and hitting a pot hole is to have a wheel crack in half on them and cause them to crash or injure themselves. I'm also going through the process of potentially making Kobe Seiko wheels (yes I will call them replicas) but in 15x8 +0 spec. As you know I have 3 'original' Kobe Seiko magnesium wheels in my possession. 1x wide and 2x narrow. We have had the wide version scanned already, but scanning was simple. The next step was to convert that rough scan into a more 'solid' CAD version and tidy up the roughness of the scan itself. Then extrapolate the spokes to make it 15" and widen it to 8". You can see this in the images here. My partner and I (in this venture) have already invested quite a bit of money to get the project to this stage. The next stages will include what's known as FEA (Finite Element Analysis) which involves VSB14 and the standards for the wheels are to be made to comply with: AS 1638-1991 and ISO 3006:2015 (or a more updated version if there is 1). I believe this will be equivalent to the Japanese industry certification that Alan was referring to, but in Australia. Once we get through all of that, it will be onto sourcing high grade alloy material and working with a local foundry to start casting wheels. We still don't know what it will cost to turn out the first wheel, but I'm guessing it won't be cheap. In part because we are not going to go the China route like everyone else. I believe this thread is a good reason why, but also we will have more control over quality and quantity produced. But also we will be employing locals and local industry keeping skills local. I actually think you'd be better off becoming an M-speed distributor rather than trying to undercut them. This is because anyone who has an interest in these wheels is likely to also have an interest in quality items being fitted to their car and not likely wanting to risk it by fitting Cha Bu Duo spec wheels to their car. If you were to contact the local foundry in Australia that helps me produce my own wheels looking to buy direct from them, then I'd want them to tell you to go away as Alan mentioned. Since they are contracted to produce a wheel where I own the casting mould or buck and have invested in that capital / tooling to produce them. The foundry was paid to make the wheel for myself (and partner) not so they can take that design / pattern and go make 1000s of them to sell on eBay etc..
  8. Bloomin eck! Now you are scaring me! [emoji33][emoji33][emoji15]
  9. 78 280Z Background....about a year ago I completely disassembled everything in my engine bay so I could repaint the bay, refurbish all the engine compartment components and then reinstall it all. I'm finished up with it all now...the last remaining task before getting the Z back on the road is bleeding all four brakes. Video Player is loading. Play Video Play Unmute Current Time 0:06 / Duration 0:19 Loaded: 100.00% Stream Type LIVE Seek to live, currently playing liveLIVE Remaining Time -0:13 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Captions captions off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text ColorWhite Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Background ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyTransparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Advertisement So today I jacked up the rear, removed the wheels and started the process by trying to bleed the left rear brake. Video Player is loading. Play Video Play Unmute Current Time 0:00 / Duration 0:19 Loaded: 100.00% Stream Type LIVE Seek to live, currently playing liveLIVE Remaining Time -0:19 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Captions captions off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Text ColorWhite Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Background ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyOpaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window ColorBlack White Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta CyanTransparencyTransparent Semi-Transparent Opaque Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Proportional Sans-Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Serif Casual Script Small Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Advertisement As an aside, before I started this "refurbish" process, the brakes were working perfectly...very firm, even braking from all four brakes. Using a Motive Products Power Bleeder, pressurized to 15 psi, I was unable to get a steady flow of brake fluid from either rear brake bleeder port. Additionally, when I tried pushing the brake pedal it was very firm...as in I could barely push it down at all. Next I connected clear tubes to both of the master cylinder bleeder ports an stuck the other end of the tubes into the reservoir (see photo). I opened the bleeder screws and was easily able to pump the brake pedal, circulating brake fluid from the bleeder into the reservoirs. So, the question is, why is the brake pedal so firm with the master cylinder bleeder screws closed, but not with the bleeder screws open? I'm thinking 1) the brake master is malfunctioning 2) there is some kind of blockage preventing brake fluid from flowing freely from the master cylinder to the rear brakes...perhaps a problem with the NP valve (proportioning valve). Eager to hear your ideas.
  10. Thanks for sharing . All but one were made in the last 20 years . Jeez - I’m glad I’m faster than a 300 Chrysler - lol. Working on a diesel intake conversion for the motor . This will be interesting . Much .bigger and longer runners . I’m a month out from a dyno session
  11. The Z accident is a bummer, but I'm not really angry about it. That kind of thing happens; we're all human. The G tweaks me. No note or anything, there was *plenty* of space, and I'll probably be out a $500 deductible to get it fixed. Lots of things I'd rather spend that money on.
  12. If you guys are replacing those switches, it may be worth while to check the materials used for the switch. You will want something stainless or nickel-plated brass. You could also head down to your local marine store to see what they've got. I know mine has a ton of these switches in stock and ready for the elements. https://www.fisheriessupply.com/sitesearch.aspx?keyword=toggle switch&sitesearch=true
  13. Yesterday
  14. Some more progress towards getting this thing painted! Insert pretty boring videos for here 🙂
  15. Haven't gotten past page 3 on your post. Did you get yours running? Sent from my ONEPLUS A3000 using Tapatalk
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