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  2. And I still need to check the two things Steve suggested Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. And I have a multimeter but still a little new at using it Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. I checked the AFM and it moves freely but I have not checked the TPS The the fuel pump is hook up correctly and I made sure it wasn’t just running off the cold start injector I found so cracked vacuum hoses and the water temp sensor is broken Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. silentbug

    Help

    Ok thank you I’ll stick with the other post Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. Today
  7. The timing set is "Engine Pro" brand. I think it will be fine and I'll chalk it up as a learning experience of what to ask about next time before ordering. I HATE the thought of a master link in the timing chain! While the cam gear didn't have the notches it did have the indents labeled 1,2,3 so I do feel confident that it is properly timed. Just got the Z last summer, I've always liked to tinker with stuff but never really got much past basic maintenance items and bolt on accessories. I finally am in a place in life where I have the means and garage to really tear into an engine. When I was younger the problem was that whatever I was working on I typically had to be able to drive it to work the next day! I'm not a mechanic by trade but I have spent the last 26 years around golf course maintenance equipment, maintaining reel mowers to cut perfectly at .100" is a pretty delicate undertaking. During my first job after college I worked with a great mechanic on taking 8 old Toro mowers and combining them to get 5 of them to operate and function properly. He taught me a lot about laying things out, cleaning up all the parts and how to assemble things. In a nutshell I know just enough to be dangerous but thanks to some great books, this forum and no real deadline for completion I have been able to deal with the challenges that pop up on a project like this. Thanks again for your assistance, I'd like to buy you a beer someday.
  8. Now you can trouble shoot that, it could also be the thermotime switch, less likely as it tends to fail off, but easy to find out. try hooking up the CSV to a 12v source, use some clip leads to it and supply a 12v (unplug the csv from the wire harness, connect the 12 directly to the csv, never the harness) it should "click". if not its prob stuck, you maybe able to get some carb cleaner into it and try cycling it a lot with the outside source. Not a bad idea to run some good fuel injector cleaner with your next tank full of gas. I thought about it more, the thermotime ONLY gets 12v during the crank so even if it was stuck on, the only thing that would happen is the injector would fire regardless of temp and would fire as long as you held the ign in the "start" position. I don't think that would allow enough time for the flooding you are having. So pretty much has to be the injector.
  9. I have been putting a list together of gearbox bearings I could need (for FS5C71B). It looks like the FS5W71B, FS5C71B and FS5C71A and the F4W71B all share nearly all the same Nissan part numbers give or take (e.g. 4 speed no bearings on overdrive). My question, or point me in the direction of a previous post, is what are the part numbers for the bearing in there generic form, eg. Timken 6205? There are a few gearbox rebuild threads, but I haven't seen any bearing info. Thanks Ian
  10. Will you be running fender liners in the front?
  11. Can you tell me the inside diameter of the back of the wheels? I want to see if there is clearance for balancing weights around my rear calipers. I’d like to know this for the 7” wide wheels as well.
  12. Thank you Whee! Will pull it up and take a read. Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
  13. okay so i had a few hours left today and i checked what would happen if i disconnected the CSV fuel line and then tried to start it. Its alive again!! thanks alot guys! i think the valve is indeed stuck open
  14. That's because that model of air dam from Kameri is designed to mount under the stock chin valence but on this car the chin valence is missing and he has attached it too high up. This is one I bought a few yrs ago but haven't used yet.
  15. The local brand..ribbed and unshrinkable....two Seinfeld episodes:
  16. okay thanks! i will try this tomorow when im in my garage. ill keep you updated
  17. Yesterday
  18. heyitsrama

    Help

    Hey @silentbug I think there are already people trying to help you out in the thread you posted earlier; Try to keep your issues contained to one thread so people can see what you have tried, its easier to get help that way. Often when people start opening up multiple threads, and DONT follow the instructions/discussions that are being held within the topics they start, the thread dies out and people stop posting help. I think ZedHead and Steve were walking you through some stuff to test out, I would listen to what they have to say, they are very well informed individuals and have helped lots of people get their 280z fuel injection system figured out, they are not wasting your time and their time trying to help. You will need a multimeter to figure out the EFI system, and YES its possible that the water temp sensor is messing with the system. https://www.amazon.com/AstroAI-Digital-Multimeter-Voltage-Tester/dp/B01ISAMUA6/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=multimeter&qid=1611644234&sr=8-5
  19. silentbug

    Help

    Hey does anyone know if a bad water temperature sensor would cause a 1978 280z to not start Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  20. Probably has some aftermarket gimracks and geegaws that needed a place to interconnect.
  21. The sandworm sold for $10,750. The driving video isn't bad. Probably worth it, a fun car that you can not worry too much about.
  22. Another ZX. Blue. Says 19k miles and kind of looks it. Not sure if I've seen the need for a terminal block in the engine bay at 19k though. Don't think that's stock. https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1981-datsun-280zx-19/
  23. if it looks like this, maybe you should take it to the Vet. 😁
  24. That part affects is the axial end play of the distributor shaft in the housing. If you switch over to a different piece (whether that is plastic or metal), you should check the end play and adjust the gap filling washers accordingly if necessary.
  25. Yeah, the timing kits seem to be all over the place, but regardless of which one people use, there doesn't seem to be a lot of chatter about failures due to cheap or inferior versions. In other words... The timing kits all seem to be acceptable. That said, there are two things that I would really try to avoid. 1) Master links, and 2) cam gears without timing marks. I'd really prefer a continuous chain. What brand is that? As for the bright links, you can just do what you did and it's fine. Those timing links line up every 22 rotations of the crank (11 rotations of the cam), so you really only need them once: https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/62752-bright-links-on-timing-chain-line-up-every-11-rotations/ The timing gashes on the back of the cam gear are more of a nuisance. If everything you're putting in is new, you can/could/should be able to assume that there is no stretch and the timing is fine on hole #1, but it would be nice to have those marks. That's the Cloyes aftermarket cam gear, right? So how new are you to this hobby? You seem to be doing pretty good for someone new?
  26. The engine will take longer to start with the CSV plugged or removed. But it's not too bad. It's a simple device and might just be stuck open. It's easy to test. Removing the fuel line and plugging it is a simple and easy way to see if that is the problem. Don't forget that it will have 36 psi behind it at all times with the pump on. And you might leave your plugs out and spin the engine to blow the excess fuel out. Sounds like there was a lot of excess fuel in the manifold.
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