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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/22/2022 in all areas

  1. Finally got the car on the road today. Put about 20 miles on it and it ran flawlessly. Suspension is smooth, I have a small knock on the right rear in need to investigate when I’m bumps but it’s bad. Otherwise it’s running great. I need to attack my electrical gremlins next . Ride height with the Eibachs and Koni’s is perfect in my opinion. Here are some pics from today.
    9 points
  2. So, I’m going to post this here because…..it’s awesome and I love Jason Cammisa. Here is Hagerty’s latest 240z video that came out today. Enjoy
    7 points
  3. Been helping a friend with his 280z, redoing the fuel system, correcting a number issues contributing to the heat soak common problem. Waiting on a new fuel tank from S30 World, decided to quit early today and ran out of table space in my shop for beverages. Found a new use for those big crash bumpers and went All Cliff on it. A tribute to him, I know he likes those ice cold dogs... @siteunseen
    7 points
  4. Received new fuel tank from S30World to replace the tank in a friends 77. Impressive quality, identical to original. Comes with what looks like a primer coat, you need to do the final finish. Slight damage in shipping to one vent and corner of flange area. Installed & car runs great, owner happy except for the cost to fill it... Joined our local club and will be going on our drive to Eureka Springs Sunday to meet up with the Ozark club. Corrected a number of other issues with exhaust manifold, egr, fuel rail, locks, etc. Back down to six S30's in garage again..
    6 points
  5. I really like my 240's wheel over the 280's. It gives a twitchy feedback which I like. It's like driving on a rail. Those new wheels that are straight on the bottom are interesting. I suppose you'd get more leg room but I steer with my legs a lot. Beer, phone and shifting is a lot to do.
    6 points
  6. So got the dash back from reskinning, what an awesome job they did! Before: After:
    6 points
  7. I had a chance to ride shotgun during the parade laps at the Mitty today. I think the HSR pace car driver is enjoying the gig.
    6 points
  8. Current condition picture. New roof is welded in and I have been leading in the corners. I am removing the dash and going to send it off to Just Dashes for repair. I am going to remove all the suspension and sandblast the tub. I am debating on getting a rotisserie or a chasis dolly. I just cant decide how I want to treat the underside of the car. It is in nice condition and could probably be pressure washed and undercoated. I will make that decision later when the car is completely stripped. A little work here a little work there. Kind of jumping around scratching my chin.
    6 points
  9. Our club hosted a fun all Nissan car show Saturday at Superior Nissan, our sponsor. A nice day, (a good barometer for that is when you see Zup in shorts) with complimentary burgers & dogs. Lots of people stopped by to chat and give the cars some love.
    6 points
  10. Just wanted to show some of the work I've been doing on my Z to fix some thoroughly rusted floorpans and rockers. It is still very much in-progress but I'll try to update as it goes on. Hopefully it'll be of help to someone as a reference, or at least encourage folks to give it a shot. If you see anything wrong with the approach, please let me know! Some quick background: The car is a '75 that I picked up in KY a few years back. Since then I fixed the fuel system and got it running, squared away the suspension (new bushings, shocks, springs, hubs, etc etc). But that is where my skill set ran out; never welded and never done resto work. Kept trying to find a shop to do the body work, but never had any luck. Then I moved and ended up close to a family member who happens to be a retired welder and enjoys doing resto/custom work on cars. Perfect chance to dive into the Z! So I bought a set of the Klassicfab panels and we dove in. The floors/rails started off like so: Driver's Side: Driver's side outer rocker looking rough: Passenger side: The drivers side was worse, but both were pretty shot. There had been a previous repair to the drivers side floor pan in 2 areas, and the rail had been reinforced as well. But both floorpans were perforated in many areas and the rockers on both sides were pretty shot. The frame rails were also obviously shot. First up, we got the car on blocks and welded in some braces. Then we removed the driver's side inner and outer rockers and floorpan (scary initially to cut into the car, but that wore off quick), leaving the seat braces largely intact. Then we welded together the new rockers (inner to outer), and welded the new frame rail to the bottom of the floorpan and tacked those in: Then we welded those in.. or actually my Uncle did most of it because that is some EXPERT level welding; that steel is THIN And then a quick check for door fitment.. should have done this after the tacks and BEFORE welding.. thankfully lined up fine (not perfectly lined up here because the bolts aren't tightened yet) Next onto the passenger side.. same strategy; started cutting out the rockers and floorpan Nice shot of the 4-layer 'sandwich' that is the rockers+pan+bottom of the A pillar: And thats as far as I've made it thus far.. more to follow in the future. What a dirty and laborious job.. but also highly rewarding so far. I am learning a ton! -Ben
    5 points
  11. Just wanted everyone to know the great experience I had dealing with Jim (S30Driver). I finally got my fender, one in great shape, and Jim put a lot of work into making it happen. I you ever have the chance to work with him on parts, you can be sure he is reliable and honest. You will never have to worry about his legitimacy. THANKE JIM.
    5 points
  12. Thought you folks would like a update. Mostly done trying to justify spending money on the correct exhaust.
    5 points
  13. Enjoying watching my son Brandon bring his new purchase back to “Like New” condition. BTW......If anyone knows where we can find any wheel flares, we’re looking hard. 1987 two door. Thanks Guy
    5 points
  14. Thanks to S30driver I’ve got operational headlights and brake lights. He recommend these LED headlights from Vintage Car LEDs. They’re beautiful and we’re plug and play. I had some gremlins in my fuse box that he helped me with also . All I have left to fix in the lighting department is the turn and hazards. I think I know the problem there. I got 120 miles on the car now. Running smooth still.
    5 points
  15. Here is the Konig Rewind in the 16" version - silver finish with machined lip, 0 offset. The tire size is 205/55X16 as per other's recommendations. This setup will closely match the OE tire diameter and avoid speedo errors. You can sometimes catch them on sale at MSA, try and watch for free shipping. Discount Tire is also an excellent source, especially if you negotiate a wheel & tire package discount.
    5 points
  16. A package arrived from France the other day.
    5 points
  17. Some more progress, some with pics and some without: Seat belts bolted in. I have some M3 x 0.6 screws on order for the mechanism covers for the seats. Carpet-style dash cover added. The guy who was going to sell his crack-free dash backed out, so I'm going to have to go to Plan B (or C or D). New handbrake boot installed. Found the shift pattern emblem for the top of the shift knob, reattached. Realized I connected the wiper motor arm 180 degrees off (it's nice when the wipers go DOWN when activated), fixed. Driver's door adjusted. It took a really hard slam to shut before; it's better now, though still not as good as the passenger door, which is 100% PERFECT. Need a bit more love. Inner and outer door sills on (thread here) I did my best to clean the outers, but they still have some "patina." I'm OK with it for now. Still working through some electrical issues, as detailed in this thread. Drove it around the neighborhood last night, and it's like a different car compared to when I first got it back on the road in mid-2020: Then, it could barely make it up the (shallow) hill in front of the house, and it was misfiring all over the place, no brakes, etc etc. Now, it brakes and turns very well, and has only some slight misfiring when warmed up, all of which I'm hoping to dial out when the Colortune arrives and I get it timed perfectly. And once I get all the lighting operational, it will be fully road-worthy. So excited. Finally persuaded my wife to take a pic of me with the car. Here's your intrepid scribe next to the car that will have been in the family for a full 50 years come October:
    5 points
  18. My experience with car covers on open trailers is that the wind will billow the cover and cause it to rub / slap against the paint. I wouldn't recommend using a cover for that purpose.
    5 points
  19. Thanks all I haven’t had any further progress on the 240z. I’ve been umming and ahhing about how to proceed. once I get some time I will head to where the car is and do some thinking. I did get my dash back from the shop. It looks fantastic, has been reskinned. @dutchzcarguy the 280zx however has had some love, it’s just so much easier to get stuff done when the car is with you unlike the 240z… I installed new Rota grid classic wheels and DGR coilovers with some T3 Negative camber roll center adjusters, T3 tri point strut bar in the front, T3 billet steering coupler and the Godzilla raceworks Cold air intake, also bought a set of recaro LXs, but am only installing the drivers seat as I love the stock velour seats but they’re horrible for spirited driving. The recaro LXs are beautiful period correct seats that really hold you in place. I’ve been collecting all the parts for a manual conversion and should be starting that shortly, I have a heavier duty clutch, fidanza aluminum flywheel to go in, only thing I haven’t been able to source is a R180 3.9 or Subaru LSD R160 3.9. But I can do the conversion and put a new diff in later. I’m in love with the zx, loving having a z to drive while I’m restoring the 240z. Can’t wait to be able to shift my own gears though, the auto box is horrendous.
    5 points
  20. I wouldn’t wish this job on my worst enemy. It is very challenging to put this differential in alone. It weight upwards of 80lbs I’d guess and holding things in position while trying to get bolts in and tightened is no easy task. I really hope I like this 3.7 differential because it will take a lot to send me back in there.
    5 points
  21. I'm just glad that you weren't somewhere underneath when it happened.
    5 points
  22. So we have three streams of debate about Ethanol. 1. Is it better for the environment? 2. Is it better or worse for your car? 3. It’s deeply rooted in politics We’ve touched on 2 and 3 and I think the conclusion on 2 is that it is probably not great for a classic car but fine for modern vehicles. It might be better to seek non-ethanol gas for your Z, but it’s not going to kill your Z either. On 3…people with differing political views on oil, energy and ethanol will not change sides. We humans are too deeply rooted in our belief systems and are unwilling to give quarter to the the other side even in the face of facts to change points of view so this debate it’s sort of pointless. On point 1. We can just follow the science. The science states corn based ethanol is probably not better and may in fact be worse for the environment. This guy breaks it down using science and data from prominent professors and institutions like Harvard. Super smart guy that I follow on YouTube. His channel is Engineering Explained and he reminds me of what Captain Obvious was probably like about 15 years or more ago.
    4 points
  23. These ended up at my place. 12/71 and ?/73 As well as this 5/72 out of Tacoma.
    4 points
  24. Since we all seem to be traveling down motorcycle memory lane, here is one of mine. A 1977 Honda Hawk, bought brand new shortly after college. Still have it but haven’t ridden it in a very long time.
    4 points
  25. LOL!! Again? Haha!! Here's the (in)famous @Mike W and @GGRIII looking over GGR's first place winning 260Z. Yes... Gary's 260 beat out Mike's 260 for the first place spot. And nobody can convince me that it was as simple as the fact that Mike's beautiful Gold Cup Z was tucked safely parked inside one of the special display buildings (and most people didn't even know it was supposed to be considered for judging?). Veni, vidi, vici Oh, and I did mention that Mike has a beautiful 260 as well, right?
    4 points
  26. Thought I would share a few pix that Mike W sent me from the Carlisle Import and Performance Nationals this week. Nissan has a special presence there this week with the new Z's release approaching & Mike and his gold cup 260z were invited as part of a special display. Looks like he joins the ranks of @jfa.series1 with special provenance for their cars ... a very good club to be in! Great shots of the old & the new.. Thanks Mike!!
    4 points
  27. Cliff, that picture is almost X-Rated. [emoji23][emoji23] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    4 points
  28. I drove manuals for decades with no neutral safety switch. I always check the car for neutral before starting with the clutch pedal down or not. You'll only try to start it in gear once, maybe twice... 😉 In other words, I wouldn't try to install one...
    4 points
  29. I jacked mine up and then set it back down on four small moving dollies (from HF). Lifts the car up high enough to be able to get under it and also allows the suspension to squirm around to neutral position which is important when tightening the suspension bolts. Put a plank or two of 2 x 10 across these: Don't let your car roll out into the street on the dollies.
    4 points
  30. Those are great. Mine look slightly different but have taps for my heavy audio requirements. I found these plain jane red and black covers on Amazon that fit the terminals well.
    4 points
  31. I have the AMCO front and rear bars which I bought used, years ago. At one time, I was thinking of mounting them, but they will go separately with 27th if and when I sell her. I actually have a bunch of AMCO stuff. Attached ad for the Z. I'm also attaching the 1972 Datsun options brochure for comparison. The interior luggage bar is going in 26th. My thoughts about the bumper bars are like those of front spoilers; just another thing out there to get bent. The AMCO bars really don't protect anything and will damage the bumper itself when it gets hit. They DO look great, though, that 'touring luxury' sort of look. Every installation of the front bar that I have seen is over the rubber strip with chromed, slotted cap screws with a nut and washer inside. I guess, that if you use the hole in the upright for the top flange bar mount, you would have to take the screw out of the rubber strip. You're going to have to drill the upright for the lower flange anyhow. Last, but not least, I have a proper hood that I would sell if you're interested.
    4 points
  32. Just to clarify what SteveJ, S30Driver and ZedHead have said, you most likely have two issues: 1) your water control valve is seized; 2) with the result that your 'TEMP' control cable wire has bent at the point where it connects to the control lever. If you have an early car ('Series 1'), this is almost certainly what's happened. Some pix and comments follow: The control cable wire for the early Z's ('Series 1') was undersized (1.0mm dia) and therefore prone to bending if anything in the assembly got stuck or balky. In later versions ('Series 2', etc.) the cable diameter was increased to 1.2mm. The cable sheaths were upsized to match. The Series 2 design incorporated numerous other detail changes to the heater control system's mechanicals in an effort to make it more robust: revised lever frame, levers, and finish knobs; revised control cable wire ends (loop-over-peg). Lawn mower control cables can be a good replacement. Alternatively, try tempered-steel 'piano wire'. Otherwise, non-tempered wire from the hardware store will probably be ok, unless something gets stuck again and you try to operate the controls at sub-zero temps. Unfortunately, your water control valve and/or its actuator lever have probably seized. The probable reason is that the valve has a leaky seal. White stains on the outside of the heater plenum box are a clue. NAPA (but not Nissan) used to offer a replacement seal, but it's been NLA for years. So, if your water control valve is leaking you'll need to buy a complete new control valve. If you don't fix this problem, the old valve will leak coolant onto the floor whenever it's left in the 'COLD' position. Also, the actuator lever will probably start to stick again, too. I suspect that problems with the water control valve stem from PO's who run their cooling systems filled with straight tap water. A stuck water control valve responds nicely to an overnight soak in a de-liming product like 'C-L-R'. If the seal is ok, then you may be good to go. However, The older-design water control valves were said to also suffer from internal leakage, leading to a situation where the valve isn't able to fully block coolant flow even when it's set to the 'off' (cold) position. That certainly wouldn't help if you plan to drive a Series 1 car on hot summer days. Make sure you also free up the water control valve's actuator lever. Lubricate its pivot pin and grease the sliding surfaces. These are some pix that I took when rebuilding the Heater system for my Series 1 car: Below: Top side of Lever Assy Note: Control cable on the left side (TEMP) had been removed when this photo was taken) Below: Bottom side of Lever Assy (photo #1 of 2) Note: The bottom control lever (DEF/ROOM) and the associated left and right bellcrank plates had been removed before this photo was taken) Below: Bottom side of Lever Assy (photo #2 of 2) Note: In this photo, the DEF/ROOM control lever, bellcrank plates, and cables are in place. However, the control lever's centre actuating pin had snapped off so the bellcrank plates had nothing to engage with. Below: Water Control Valve, c/w actuator lever assy (actuator cable has been removed) Note: Control valve's actuator rod can be seen here. Actuator lever may need to be freed up and lubricated if it, too, has become frozen because of corrosion. Below: Water Control Valve's actuator lever assy Note stains. Presumably caused by leakage from the Water Control Valve. They look like calcium deposits. If they are, then my car's cooling system must have been filled with straight water at some point (probably during the time when it lived in New Mexico). Below: 'TEMP' actuator cable with bent wire (photo #1 of 2) Note: Here, the cable is fully extended and the bellcrank has been rotated about 45 degrees CW from its centred position. Below: 'TEMP' actuator cable with bent wire (photo #2 of 2) Note: Here, the cable is fully retracted, but the bellcrank has not been rotated CCW any further than its centred position.
    4 points
  33. As Nissan sourced many parts from outside companies it meant enterprising parts houses in the USA could source the parts directly rather than from Nissan. World Parts, Beck Arnley, Lazorlite were some of them that actively sold parts for the 240Z, and many others Asian cars, in the North American Market. Once you have the parts cross reference numbers its easy to find what you need through EBay and Craigslist etc. Sometimes the same Nissan part number is also used. The other day I got a rebuild kit for the rear brake cylinder on my 8/1970 240Z, Nissan # 44100 E4127, off EBay. The Lazorlite part number was identical to the Nissan one and in the box were Tokico parts just as were originally used on my 240Z. Amazing how you can still find NOS parts for our cars. I've also sourced suspension bushes, wheel bearings, seals, from Lazorlite. The front suspension ball joint on the 240Z was made by 555 and supplied to Nissan, they also sold to the US parts houses. I'm slowly building up a cross reference list of the part numbers for the 1970 240Z. I just picked up some inner rear wheel bearings for $15 each. Nachi make them and again they put the same Nissan parts number on the box, #43210 E4100. They are exactly the same as the original ones I just removed from the rear hub carrier.
    4 points
  34. I can’t wait to try them out! I finished painting all the parts and removing the bushings. I’ve started to reinstall the front end and making progress but it’s definitely slower than removal!
    4 points
  35. Yup in the main panel, not the drains. I would get some fine stainless mesh and melt it into the backside with a heating iron. I plastic weld panels a lot for the vehicles I repair. I'm not a fan of super glue. Really doesn't work that well in this situation. A good epoxy might work but the nice thing about plastic welding is it allows to to work the repair some when it gets soft and dress it smooth when it cools. I would mesh across the hole and repunch the hole when it cools. Google some videos for plastic welding.
    4 points
  36. Alright folks, everything is in. I’ll let the seal gasket dry overnight and will try to put mount to the car. The darn thing is heavy as a whole unit. Shifting is smooth and tight. The plastic shifter bushing is ordered and on its way.
    4 points
  37. IMG_7052.MOV Getting ready for the first drive of the year
    4 points
  38. Actually (sorry) the auxiliary air regulator (AAR) is what keeps idle speed up until the engine warms up a bit. Pretty common for them to be stuck open or closed and/or not have power to the heating element. There are several threads on the forum about them.
    4 points
  39. Sorry Pat, just saw this. Thanks! Pretty much hammer forming. I did use the vice as brake in the beginning to make the wide U shape then flattened the one end back down in the vice and started beating. Ended up rounding the lower angles using a 3 way trailer ball hitch as dolly in the vice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    4 points
  40. IMG_5685.MOV Additional photos, cherry blossoms , like me , Japanese people really love it. Side note , original tire was 175 HR 14 for this car , not available anymore today .Yokohama tyre is selling 175 80-14 for classic cars . I put them on my car , not perfect but not bad . Kats IMG_5680.MOV
    4 points
  41. Hi Gavin , I see you have skills!! I want to do it like you , but maybe I can’t. Just give it a try. I will show you my progress of hammering bumpers and panels . Yesterday I took my 240ZG to my mothers home, 885km (550 mile) . I checked 606.2 km for 44.45 litters during daytime , 90 % on the high way .The fuel economy was 13.63 kilometers/ litter ( 32.08 miles /US gal) . Conditions were like this , Average speed 100km/h with 5th gear / 3.9 final gear Overall field elevation, I don’t know ,, but Japan ,a lot of mountains everywhere in a small landscape .Probably I was driving on a Slightly up and down road . Average temperature was 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees fahrenheit). Wind less than 10 knots, variable. Does my maths look reasonable ? Kats IMG_5643.MOV
    4 points
  42. ALL CLIFF... id·i·om /ˈidēəm/ noun 1. a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g., rain cats and dogs) 1.2 derived from all idiot (e.g., drink until eyes are floating)
    3 points
  43. Are we gonna let the box hang out the hatch or fold you in half in a shorter box? 🤣🤣
    3 points
  44. What alternator are you running? I'm considering putting some rattle in the hatch of my '77. Be like 1986 with four Pioneer 6x9 ts6907 in a plywood box. The Z is a perfect coupe for LOUD.
    3 points
  45. So removing the rear spring was uneventful. No helmet required. I got one side compete today. When I pulled the old spring and shock off I found an insulator from 260z. The only reason I know that it is because it has yellow writing on from what would be a salvage yard and said “74z. R” see pic. Height difference seems to be about 1 1/4” lower. Looks better, another 1/2” would have been perfect. I have Eibach springs, and a 240z insulator. See pics below. I think once the car rolls a bit it will sit lower. It just came off a jack so the wheels are still canted inwards. Also got the half shafts greased up used the Captain Obvious “grind” method. Thanks CO!
    3 points
  46. This is my transmission porn, Cliffs looks great in natural aluminum. I used purple power, pressure washers and a wire brush. Then painted with Cast Iron color engine paint. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    3 points
  47. That's a loaded question. Let me phrase it another way. What circuits can only be powered when the ignition switch is on? The fuses with red only are powered with the key in ON. The fuses in green use the combo switch (headlight/parking light switch). The common fuse is for the cigarette lighter. The clock is on the same fuse as the dome lamp and map light. (I think the wiper park function is on that fuse, too.) So what could drain the battery? Bad voltage regulator Bad alternator Clock (even if it's not running) Dome light, map light, and glove box light (door not closed all of the way - Note: This only applies to the 240Z. The parking lights have to be on for the 260Z or 280Z glove box light to come on.) Aftermarket stereo Aftermarket alarm Aftermarket accessory like remote locks (The previous owner had that on my 260Z. I removed the remote lock and fixed the door lock properly.) Unknown cross-connection Short in the starting motor (unlikely but here for completeness) To help you with the diagnosis When did it start? How long does it take to drain the battery? Do you know how to use a voltmeter and ammeter? Do you own a test light?
    3 points
  48. Of course it is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azxx9sG4Gjw
    3 points

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