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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/25/2021 in all areas

  1. Congrats to @Mike on another year of a big bunch of Z Crazies still posting on this site. Another year of @siteunseen with a new computer.....kind of like giving a loaded .357 to a two year old, @Patcon with 2 projects that may never end......EVER, and @Jeff G 78 adjusting to the Arizona climate, and posting pics of a race car that needs to be eating oats with Secretariat!@Zed Headwill answer all of your questions and 85% will be correct. If you want to solve any electrical problems, the only person to contact is @SteveJhands down. @Captain Obviouswill still swear that flat tops are great......3000 1973 Z owners that switched are wrong lol. @HS30-Hwill poke at you till you finally admit that he is probably the most knowledgeable member ever! @Zupwill once again be the nicest member and @motorman7will continue to rub your nose in a before and after pic of every part of the Z anatomy until you feel like a total failure lol! @EuroDat, @grannyknot,will show up from time to time with some decent stuff and the rest is history. Sorry for all I missed......you all are awesome and Happy New Year to “What did you do to your Z today 2022!” Guy
    11 points
  2. 1987 My first car purchase. Saved for 2 1/2 years
    9 points
  3. If you have a project that requires a few days of uninterrupted time (no one will get near you) print this out or PM me your number and I'll send it via text message. When you're finished get a negative test result and resume the hustle and bustle we all live with. You're welcome!
    8 points
  4. I just bought my new Z! RabbitZ! Added to my garage [1]! Yay! I’m thrilled! [1] Rabbit - https://www.classiczcars.com/garage/vehicle/1912-rabbit/
    7 points
  5. I did the rapid test at my physician's office this morning and the results were negative. Never have I been so happy to go back to work! Initially I had the PCR test that came back positive so I quarantined for 10 days and had another PCR test. Still detected Covid. Then I talked with my pharmacist and my doctor's PA. They said the PCR would show the slightest amount for up to and even beyond 4 weeks. So the lesson here for me, to get the negative result, was after your symptoms are gone and you've done the 10 day quarantine get the rapid antigen test. The free money days are over for Covid and I have a mortgage plus a Datsun diZease. This turned my world upside down for almost 2 weeks and I was only sick for 48 hours. The dead giveaway for me were the night sweats so pay attention to that and keep your mouth shut. It's hard not to talk about being positive but not something you really want to share, at least for me. People are scared.
    6 points
  6. Hi everyone, thank you so much for kind words for me . I am back here and I am so happy that I can communicate with you again . So many things has been changed since I posted last time , I hope everyone’s safe in this Covid-19. I don’t know what to say , I don’t know where to start to tell you about . Anyway I am doing good , I thank my friends here to recover my energy of life .Even when I was depressed badly, I didn’t forget about all of you . I was hoping I would bring a news when I become normal. Yesterday I felt for the first time in my life that I want to buy a new Z other than my S30s . But , I don’t have enough money because last month I spent my money for the 240Z which is just 10 cars older than my US blue 240Z . It is going to arrive at Yokohama next week by boat , I will let you know the details when I have got the car in my hands. Very rough condition, but I can’t ignore it because of the chassis number and blue exterior and blue interior like my HLS30-02156 . Kats
    6 points
  7. Hi Kats, Amazingly, despite my expectations, I actually like it too. Maybe even love it. Perhaps I have Omicron...!? Some people outside Japan will be missing the reference point, which is:
    6 points
  8. Oh, you're serious. What dumbass would give you money so you can ride around in an air conditioned 50 year old car? When I need money I go to a bank or when I was a kid, maybe my grandparents but they made me work for it. I guess your free money plan is better than robbing but not by much. Sorry for all the negative remarks but you opened the door for it so get ready there'll be more to come.
    6 points
  9. Here are a few of my old pics. First is the orange '72 240Z the day I bought it. It was my first Z and I bought it for $200 along with brown '76 280Z for $400 in 1982. The 240 ran great, but was too rusty to fix, so I parted it out and used the SU's on my race car over 15 years after I pulled them from the 240Z. Next up was my first nice Z. I bought the '76 280Z in Atlanta in 1986. This pic was the day I bought it. I gave it a wash before driving it 750 miles home the next day. I pulled the Libre wheels and sold those to a member here a few years ago and I pulled the headlight covers and after 30 years of storage, installed them on the race car. The white 240Z's were a clean Arizona '72 rolling chassis that I bought sight unseen from Arizona and had shipped back to Michigan. The pic was taken the day it arrived in 1995. The '73 was a really rusty car that I bought cheap because it had a lot of good performance parts including triple Webers and Bilstein struts. I combined the two Z's and cut up the '73. The '72 ended up with a forum member and was moved to Paris, France. Finally, here is a pic of my '78 280Z the day I bought it in Atlanta in 1990. I still have it almost 32 years later.
    6 points
  10. 6 points
  11. Our youngest (43) gave me these coasters that he made on his new 3D printer. They're glued to cork beds and a clearcoat over the Z emblem. I think they're pretty hot!
    6 points
  12. I’ll try again. I’ll start a new thread and let this one die. DatsunZguy, I’ll try again, take your time to get to know me and why we are here. Boasting is not my character
    5 points
  13. Side bar…my fuel tank arrived yesterday. Looks good…it looks like it has a thick rubber coating on it. Clean inside, and it is guaranteed for life. Guy cut it in half, addressed any issues and removed all the rust and then welded it back, It was baked 3x during the process and then sealed on the outside. The exterior has paint streaks but I knew that going it. The material they use cannot be sprayed he said. As long as it trouble free I don’t care.
    5 points
  14. I just couldn’t live with the gimpy hack that I had to use to get the 240z parking brake cable to connect to my rear Maxima calipers, so I cobbled together my own assembly. This probably could have been done without totally destroying the parking brake cable I bought from Z Car Depot, but I didn’t know that at the time. Here’s a step by step of how I put this together. Someone could probably evolve this and get to a better solution that doesn’t cost as much, doesn’t produce as much waste, and is easier, but this works. If you are using 200 SX calipers I am guessing the process would be largely the same. Supplies needed: 2 x 1984 Nissan Maxima parking brake cable assemblies 1 x 1973 Datsun 240z parking brake cable assembly if you are going to try to get the fittinngs to fit, otherwise you’ll need some 5/8th inch 6061 aluminum rod (or stainless steel if you have a fantastic lathe) + all necessary measurements for the fittings that mount to the bracket on the body of the car 1 x length of 1/8th inch stainless steel cable (I went with 10 feet so I had more than enough to make mistakes) 2 x 1/8th inch cable swage ends 2 x 5/8th inch insulated Adel / cable clamps 2 x Sheet metal screws JB Weld or similar metal epoxy Tools: A swage crimper with swappable hexagonal jaws A measuring tape A micrometer A razor knife Glue Cable cutters A rotary saw A drill + bits Various screwdrivers, pliers, etc. Sequence: Step 0. Either remove your 240Z housing fittings and open them up to be crimped onto the Maxima housing or take measurements from these to have a machinist make you at least 2 sets of fittings. If you repurpose the fittings from the 240Z housing, you may find that heating them with a torch and using punches will work. Mine were ferous but I could not get them soft enough to open without tearing, so I took the machinist route. Step 1. Measure how far the cables for each cable assembly extend beyond the ends of the housings. Disassemble both housings completely. Remove extraneous housing brackets and sheaths from the Maxima housing, taking care to minimize the damage to each piece. Save all parts. Step 2. Find a suitable location for an Adel clamp to mount on either side of the 240Z body. Find a good route around the underside of the car that clears all of your running gear and suspension and allows for gradual curves, preventing kinks and binding. I opted for putting the Adel clamps on the inboard sides of the Bad Dog frame rail extensions I put on the car before the paint was done, as well as using the spring suspenders that the original 240Z housing uses. Take note of where the housing will need to be cut to mount to the under side of the transmission hump in the cable bracket and mark with blue tape or similar. Note: The Maxima housing is slightly larger in diameter than the aftermarket 240Z housing I got from Z Car Depot. Those pieces won’t just slide on, and getting a set that hasn’t been crimped yet was a fruitless endeavor, because the manufacturer didn’t feel like selling them to me. You may be able to go the other way and make the piece that fits into the Maxima caliper and fits onto the 240Z housing, but I found the 240Z housing to be too short to route well without binding and opted for trimming the Maxima housings. Step 3. As stated in Step 0, either reuse or replicate the housing ends of the 240Z cable housing. I destroyed two of mine (there are four on these housings) by trying to open up the crimped ends, which may be possible with the right tools, but I don’t have those so I abandoned this path and opted for having a local machinist replicate the ones I didn’t murder. He made me four of them (2 for failures) out of 6061 aluminum rod in exchange for a 750ml bottle of Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey. Stainless steel would be better, but these parts don’t have a ton of force on them in any direction so he and I agreed that aluminum will be just fine. Step 4. Use a rotary cutting wheel to cut the Maxima housings to the length determined during Step 2. For me this came to about 37 inches from the end of the metal part that mounts to the caliper to the cut point. The housings are sprung steel with a rubbery black plastic coating. A hack saw and file might work fine but will take a while and give you a nasty edge because of the coiled design of the tube. I know this because I tried it. Step 5. Relocate the ribbed sheath with the smaller diameter to cover the area where the other sheath was glued to the housing. This is where my finished housing will go through the Adel clamp, and I found this ribbed piece to be a good size to fill the Adel clamp without it squeezing the housing too tightly or leaving it sloppy. Step 6 (optional). Fix rubber pieces in place to aid assembly. I opted to use some flexible glue that gets along with the rubber bits to fix them in place. I wanted to reduce the opportunities for moisture to get into the cable (and this is a nice feature upgrade from the aftermarket 240Z cable I got from Z Car Depot), as well as keep things from sliding around as I test fit everything. Step 7. Reinsert the white nylon tube into the Maxima housing. Trim to be flush with the cut end of the housing. I trimmed both ends to clean it up since it was a bit worn on each end. Step 8. TEST FIT EVERYTHING NOW! Step 9. POINT OF NO RETURN - Assemble the housing pieces and crimp the 240Z housing pieces onto the Maxima cable housing. Be careful to not over crimp the 240Z piece and crush the Maxima piece. CRIMP SLOWLY! The inside of the 240Z piece is going to shrink and may need to be opened up to allow the cable to pass through if it’s squeeze too far. Check tolerances and test fit often. I rushed the first set so all my careful choosing of the best bits was for nothing as my two best ripped and ended up in the trash. Also, don’t crimp too close to the collar. That caused the tears in the first round. Note: A few observations from the machinist about the replica pieces… A. The hole that the cable goes through was hard to get the right size on his 1943 lathe because of his selection of ASE drill bits not being in small enough increments. We opted to ensure enough space for the cable by going a little too big, which allowed the white nylon tube inside the housing to escape as the cable slid back and forth. After the second try I found the crimping shrank the opening enough to keep the white nylon in the housing while allowing the cable to move freely. B. It’s tough to get the channel for the spring clip precise on an old-school lathe. CNC probably could get it closer, but we opted for too tight and filing if necessary. Because these are aluminum and the spring clips are steel, a little persuasion with a brass hammer did the job. C. The reason we made 4 and not 2 is so we could test all tolerances and choose the combination of fine tuning challenges. Since these are all hand made there were differences, so I used hand tools on the fittings and the bracket to make them fit. Step 10. Test fit again. Step 11. Put the rubber boots onto the ends of the Maxima housing. Step 12. Crimp a swage onto the end of the steel cable. Put a cylindrical bead from the Maxima on the cable, followed by one of the Maxima housings with a 240z end. Put the couple for the hand brake on, then the other Maxima housing with 240z end (flipped the opposite direction), another bead and a swage end. DO NOT CRIMP THE SECOND SWAGE END YET! BONUS PICTURE OF DOG INTERRUPTING PROCESS. Step 13. Test fit the entire assembly. Make sure the screw that connects the U-bracket to the handbrake lever is fully extended to ensure the maximum available adjustment length, but lease a few threads peaking past the nut for a smidgin of safety. Note: I replaced the OEM screw with a 70mm stainless M6 1.0 pitch hex socket cap head bolt. It fits into the assembly well. The old one was bent and this one has threads down the entire length, giving me much more room to adjust it. Any cable will stretch over time so you want something like this to maximize adjustability. Step 14. Position the bead and swage end you didn’t crimp inside the caliper lever, pull the cable taught, and mark the position of the swage end on the cable with a piece of blue tape. Step 15. Remove the assembly on the side that you just marked from the caliper and crimp the swage end where it should be. Cut the excess cable off. Note: I put a bit of JB Weld over the frayed end of the cable where I cut it, bonding it to the crimped swage end on each side of the car. This will keep moisture out and gives me just a little more insurance that it will stay on, because Garage Build. Step 16. Reassemble, tighten the bolt that joins the cable to the hand brake, and test the system. Edit: The slack you see above between the swage end and the head disappeared once I tightened up the bolt in the u-bracket. Edit: I think I might end up putting zip ties or something on the boots that cover the black Maxima housing. The glue I used isn’t holding. I might also have used a nylon coated cable if I was doing the entire thing over again. The reason I didn’t is that I didn’t trust the swage end to stay on with that nylon creating a failure point. If it disintegrates you end up with a loose crimp, and since this was done with hand tools I just didn’t feel confident about that.
    5 points
  15. So I took the block and rotating assembly to a local machine shop about the end of August. He finished it right before Christmas. I picked it up a week ago. Stock bore and stroke is 85mm x 86mm. We punched it out to 89mm. I sourced the pistons from Dave Rebello I believe they're KA's turned down They sonic checked the block after boring. I was told the minimum would be 0.0100". We are well within that. All line bored and balanced Everything has a witness mark so we can reassemble the way it was balanced Crank was turned 0.010 & 0.010 es w The challenge now is getting bearings. I have the rod bearings now but am having trouble getting the main bearings. I made another order the other day because the first order got delayed. Many places were saying end of April for bearings!! Evidently freeze plugs are hard to get too. That is why one of them is steel and not brass. Any recommendations on engine paint? Not super obsessive about true Datsun blue but would like it to be close.
    5 points
  16. Hi , I am now seeing a new Z , at Tokyo auto salon . I like it. Kats
    5 points
  17. Here are a few pics of the tank upon arrival. I’ll post internal pics once I get back to my shop.
    5 points
  18. Late Christmas gifts from Bogota, Columbia today.
    5 points
  19. Good stuff. CAD skills to even a beginner degree are something I wish I had. While I thought I was done with metal work, I decided to revisit a repair I made to the tail light panel where it forms the ledge inside the hatch opening. My repair in the passenger corner was one of my early metal repair efforts on this car. As I am now focusing again on the tail light panel - it has received the least attention so far, I decided that the inside corner areas were not up to par with the rest of the car. Because the car received a light impact to the rear at some point, the sealer under the ledge had cracked, and gave an opening to moisture. So, in the hatch corners, the metal had obviously rusted in between the panels, causing the ledge (in the corners) to puff up a bit. This area on the left and right is what I am talking about: After cutting away the old panel sections, and grinding away the rusted metal, I used a chemical treatment to neutralize the remaining spots of rust. Then, I fabricated a patch panel. I spent extra time getting the fit as close to dead on as possible. Then, I decided to use the spot welder I bought (a while back now). It does a good job, for sure, but when I purchased it, I was hoping it would replicate the factory welds. Unfortunately, these spot welds are notably smaller in diameter. Still a cool tool though. It won't reach everywhere, of course, so I put a few rosette welds (large round welds next to the mig weld seam) to finish putting welds back in the factory locations. Most of these spot welds are in the factory locations, but I also put a couple of extra ones. 🙂 A whole bunch of pictures follow: After grinding away the extra, I used 80 grit on a DA Sander to give the entire repair area a nice texture. I feel better about this repair than leaving it the way it was. Now, I just have to repeat for the right side. It will take several hours.
    5 points
  20. It might be time for me to upgrade from Windows 98 since my Juno dial-up speed seems to be crawling on my 56K modem 😉
    5 points
  21. While waiting for fasteners to be re-plated, I find myself looking for little projects to complete. I went about restoring the front turn signal assemblies yesterday and today. These front lenses get a lot of abuse... essentially, they get sand blasted over time. These are likely original to the car. They look ok at 10 feet, but get up close and you can see they are quite dull. And, they have taken some impacts from rocks and road debris. The close ups were taken at 5X magnification. I used several grits of sandpaper and performed a wet sanding process. I started with 320 grit, then moved on to 600, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500. For the first two grits, I left tape in place to protect the lettering. After wet sanding, I buff with Meguiar's compounds and foam buffing pads. #83 first, then #7 "Show Glaze", using different buffing pads to keep from mixing. While I didn't achieve perfection, the results are pretty good. Next up will be the rear tail light lenses. They will be easy in comparison because they don't take the sandblasting impacts like the front lenses.
    5 points
  22. Today with my son's help I finished assembling/installing the rolling support frame for my shell. The Unistrut channel comes in 10 foot lengths so I decided to leave the long members full length. Here is the result, no major issues were encountered.
    4 points
  23. Passengers side Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    4 points
  24. I had today off from work, so I worked on adjusting the tail light panel to make the trim panels and license light fit better. A straight edge laid across the hatch latch opening revealed a slight gap on the left side. Because the top panel of the tail light panel is not flat, I used sections of flat bar and a good quality C clamp to persuade the low spot upward. The hole just to the left of the flat bar in the third pic is the license light (left) mounting hole. After raising that up, I had improved things by about 1/32". I reinstalled the license light and the measurements on each side were equal. Unfortunately, I still had a gap between the license light assembly and the left tail light panel (first pic). The right side still fit nicely (second pic). Given that the license light was level, I pointed my attention at the left tail light panel. A little work with hammer and dolly and the "ledge" was brought downward to meet the license light assembly (third pic): Here is the license light assembly after finishing the fitting work: Next, I turned my attention to the bottom of the three trim panels. I measured the depth of the middle license panel at the left, center, and right - the right side was pushed in by 2 mm compared to the left and middle. So, I had to work a bit on the "stand off" to which the right side of the license panel secures. It was still not 100% right, even with the work I had done on it originally (it was squashed a bit when the car was hit). I was able to straighten it out the needed amount so that the depth readings were the same: left, middle, and right. Finally, I test fit the hatch and looked at the gaps at the top and bottom of the three panels: The fitting of all these bits took many hours, however, I think I finally have it. Next, I will pic back up on filler work on the tail light panel and get that looking really nice.
    4 points
  25. Even Hondas want to be Z people.
    4 points
  26. This is so neat Katz! Thank you for sharing. Here's my guess (verb).
    4 points
  27. I Have installed a few windows in British cars and this is my second opportunity with a 240Z. So, I don’t have a tremendous amount of experience, but I think this will provide a bit more detail that may help you. Outlined below is a procedure that worked well for me and I hope will help you. Please feel free to correct/improve the process for the next guy. Door Glass Install Install the outside rear view mirror. I installed insulation and sound deadener. I think this helps with noise and temperature control and it also gives the door a bit of added weight improving the feel of the door. I put white lithium grease on the rollers and channels, and on just about anything else that moved before installing anything. I installed the door locking mechanism, and all of its associated parts exterior door handle, key lock, and interior door handle. I removed the door sash (frame/channel that surrounds the glass) to make it easier. I installed the window regulator. To move the regulator I attached a vise grip to the knurled winder mechanism, be careful not to crush the grooves. At this point my troubles began. From what I read I thought that the front sash (front channel about 12 inches long) and the guide channel were supposed to be installed. I tried installing the glass by reversing what the service manual describes for removing the glass. Tilting it and sliding the front roller into its channel. I wasted hours and lost ½ a pint of blood and got nowhere. When the front roller was in the channel it would come out as I tried to install the rear roller, or the front sash guide. So, I walked away had a cup of coffee and decided to take a look at the entire mechanism. I was alone on this task so it is easy to get worn out hunched, and holding the glass, etc. Here is what I came up with and the glass was installed in less than 30 minutes. The first (6) six steps are valid and was my starting point. The front sash (approximately 12 inch long channel for the plastic slide at the front of the glass) and the guide channel (approximately 4 inch channel mid door toward the door lock) are not installed at this point. I think this would be a good time to remind you that you should install the outside rear view window before going any further. It’s painful to do it after installing the glass, don’t ask how I know that it is painful. Getting the window into the car can be tricky. The manual suggests: front first and down on an angle. If you are concerned about your paint I would protect it with at least a strip of tape on all edges of the door. Watch the outside of the window as it enters the door as there are screws (at the front tip of the window where the slide is located), that can get hung up on the door. The window sits closest to the door skin, in between the skin and the window regulator. At this point I re-installed the window sash with one screw in each or the two top corners. There are 3 rollers. Two of the rollers face the window. One faces the interior of the car. One of the two rollers that face the window will be on your left as you face the interior of the door. The 2nd roller will be on your right. The right most roller is mounted on an arm that has the third roller (facing the interior of the car) attached at the opposite end of the arm. This roller (facing the interior of the car) should be sitting down, toward the bottom of the door, before you try to install either of the other rollers. If it is not in this position it will be more difficult to position it later on because it will get hung up on the regulator and the interior door sheet metal. Seating the regulator rollers into the window channel Wind the regulator almost all the way down. Now slowly wind the regulator up and watch the rear channel, toward the door lock. I believe this step is easier if this roller enters the channel from the right side (nearest to the door hinge) of the channel. When it is close to the regulator roller slide the glass forward or back to allow the roller to enter the channel. Once the roller is in place slide the glass a bit more to insure that the roller stays in the channel. Slowly wind the regulator almost to the bottom of the door. I believe this step is easier if this 2nd roller enters its channel from the left side of the channel, nearest the door lock. Remember the third roller must be lower than the other two rollers. Watch the front channel of the glass. When it is close to the level of the regulator front roller stop and move the glass forward toward the door hinge, make sure you don’t move the glass so much that the first roller comes out of its channel. Push the roller into the channel and slide the glass toward the rear (toward the door lock) to keep the roller in the channel. To move the roller toward the channel you might try pushing down on the opposite side of the arm where the 3rd roller is located. You might also need to grab the glass and move it forward (toward the door hinge) corner up toward the top of the door. Slowly wind the regulator up about half way, when the remaining roller is accessible slide the guide channel on to the roller. Move the guide channel toward its mounting holes to get the guide studs in position. You may need to wind the regulator up or down slightly to get the guide channel studs to their mounting holes in the door. When one is in the hole place a nut on it to insure that it stays put. By winding the window up/down you should be able to manipulate the guide channel’s 2nd stud into its mounting hole. Now from the top (right side facing the door interior) push the front sash down and guide it onto the plastic window slide. Push it down and move the window to the front or rear so you can place the screws through the door and into the front sash. Tighten (finger tight) everything and using the window regulator roll the window up and down. If everything is moving smoothly then tighten everything and bandage any wounds.
    4 points
  28. Hi Kats. I have a theory. Just a hunch, but I feel that the very high profile of Takeuchi san's PZR in recent years has been an inspiration to Nissan's design team. His car has been seen in magazines, videos, blogs, social media posts, indoor and outdoor shows, autocrosses and just generally driving around everywhere. It has even been my personal taxi service on more than one occasion. Takeuchi san is very generous with his time and his car, and many people get to see it. Takeuchi san even joined us here on classiczcars.com and shared his restoration with us. It is one of the most special variants of the S30-series Z range, but it is not locked away in a glass box. It lives! I think the styling team's inspiration for this 'Customized Proto' show car was not just any Fairlady Z432-R, but Takeuchi san's 432-R in particular.
    4 points
  29. If you submitted a credit card number with that order, I would monitor it carefully. I have NEVER had to submit extra documentation to a vendor and to hell if I ever would. Pay a few bucks more and buy from a reputable vendor like Motorsport Auto or ZCarDepot.
    4 points
  30. I've had a brand new slave cylinder leak. Sometimes you'll find machining grit inside if you take them apart, even brand new. Quality control on aftermarket parts is just poor. Take it back and see if you can exchange for a different brand, then take it apart at home and clean it up inside before installing. I think that EuroDat has seen similar if you want to search for past posts about it. @EuroDat
    4 points
  31. As with many milestone automobiles, the 240Z has evolved from a enthusiast car, to collector classic and now a market speculator's commodity. I have owned a few over the years, but hearken back to a simpler time in my youth when my first Z cost me $3,500 in the early 1980s. I have mixed emotions regarding current values and would have to give serious pause about getting into the hobby today given the high cost of entry. I am just glad to have purchased mine years ago and restored it at a time when NOS parts were still available and reasonable.
    4 points
  32. It's very Z432-R or PS30-SB inspired. I'm looking forward to seeing how the tuning scene takes to these cars. With twin turbos I'm expecting them to be quite a popular thing. Edit: just saw others reference the 432-R also. @katsI think your photos make me appreciate it more than another couple of earlier photos I saw. The only critique of this car I have is regarding the hip lines. Which seem to be able to be drawn back to the 350z. The original S30z is very svelte through the waistline, where as the 350z/370z are quite wide in that area. I am not sure if it's a constraint of modern cars or a design choice. But I also own an FD3S RX7 and I just feel the S30z and FD are so similar in design approach. Both have feminine lines, but at the same time are quite muscular. Perhaps I will feel different when I see the new Z in person but I think it's the 1 thing I would change if I was lead design at Nissan. I otherwise think it's a great to see Nissan finally start to embrace what was so special about the early cars after years of moving away from it.
    4 points
  33. @kats So nice to see you around here!
    4 points
  34. I think you hit it right on the head. We’ve seen a surge of driver quality Zs hit the market. Timing and presentation are two vital parts in a successful auction, lately one or both being absent in many. I think that’s pretty clear with the ‘72 being listed right now bringing in strong money. Had it not been presented so professionally, I’d doubt a car with a cracked dash, non-original engine, and filthy underside would pull that kind of money.
    4 points
  35. Finally received the seat cover kit from Z Car Source, turned out much better. 👍
    4 points
  36. Welcome to the Datsun Z Restorers Club. Your statement above is our Moto. 😎
    4 points
  37. You guys make me feel like a neophyte. My first computer was a Pentium II hand me down. My stepdaughter bought it used from Boeing surplus (back then Dell didn’t have the contract). She fiddled with it, then gave it to her brother to use for recording music for his garage band. It didn’t meet his needs, so he bought a new one, and asked if I wanted it. I said sure, he brought it over and I stuck it in the corner. Mrs. Racer 2.0 pestered me to do something with it or get rid of it. So one day I set it up, and turned it on. Then there were a bazillion calls, first to the boy, then his sister. Eventually I got it running, then got online with one of the free internet access services, with a 28.8k telephone modem. That was 1998. It didn’t take long and I upgraded to a 56k modem, then cable through my TV cable company. At first it was I the one calling the kids for help. But it didn’t take long before I was upgrading the processor and memory, then building a new computer from scratch. I bought a seat of AutoCAD, and Photoshop. Then it was the kids calling me for help with their computers. Since then I have built five machines, two with dual head video cards, one for CAD work, one for photography work. One of the single display machines I use for digitizing my vinyl record collection. A friend said my computer room looks like a display at Best Buy.
    4 points
  38. There's a good chance that the water pump bolts have either already been broken by a previous owner, or will break as you are removing them. It's not that big of a deal if you break one, they aren't terribly hard to remove, especially with the engine on a stand and not in the car. I would go ahead and replace the head gasket and timing chain while the engine is out. The book that Siteunseen mentioned is the way to go for sure. I had never done it before and used that book. Made perfect sense and I'm no real veteran at this stuff. If setting the cam timing is your biggest worry, that book makes it plain and clear. Plus there's lots of threads on here about it, and if you get stumped, folks are happy to help.
    4 points
  39. If you haven't already bought this I highly recommend. I built some dirt bikes and boat motors so I knew the basics but I'd never done a car motor. I bought this book for $20 and didn't have to call my Dad for help at all. I think it whizzed him off? https://www.amazon.com/Rebuild-Your-Nissan-Datsun-Engine/dp/1931128030 Great how to book. He makes you want to do it unlike Haynes and Chilton manuals. They suck in my opinion.
    4 points
  40. The reason that a lot of Z's rust out in that area is because the rain gutter ends too soon and dumps water right on to that spot and that spot also slopes back in toward the car so the water just sits in a pool until it evaporates. I started adding an extension on to the rain gutters to remove the water completely.
    4 points
  41. I had a terrible time getting my drums off when I redid my brakes. After looking for a large puller hi and low on both line an locally I decided to devise my one and it worked perfectly. Had the drums off in under 10 mins. I bought two large c-clamps at Lowes and placed a 2x2 wooded board between them with a large socket taped to the middle that would pass through the drum. Here’s a pic, way better than beating the drums and breaking a cooling fin off. The only trick is to the turn each c-clamp a small amount and in sequence with the other one or the device will pope off due to becoming uneven. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    4 points
  42. Looks like more than the cars need a restoration. Looking forward to the time we can restore ourselves instead of the cars LOL.
    4 points
  43. Working on seat mounts for passenger side and since I just ran out of welding gas, I went ahead and cut out the driver's side floor and got it cleaned up. Started the patch panel for the forward foot well to fix up the rust where the floor pan welds up to. Smoked turkey for Christmas dinner. Had to share
    4 points
  44. I will be sending my shell to the body shop soon, so I have been designing a support frame with casters that I can attach to the bottom of the chassis. I will use this to get the shell onto a deck truck for transport, and to use during the reassembly process. It is similar to what @inline6did, main difference with mine is that it is a fully bolted Unistrut construction, as I have no access to a welder at home. Here is an image of the final concept. This morning I finished doing some pre-assembly, test fits and checks for any missing any hardware. So far it has gone together without issue, kind of like the Meccano set I had as a kid. Here are a few pics, I will be completing this project over the weekend, and will post pics with it fully installed.
    3 points
  45. I'd think an electric pump continually running fuel through but you need to sure it's an open flowing system. The return to the tank should be open allowing fuel to flow non stop. Fuel is cooling when it flows freely. You say manifold heat? Have you thought of replacing that cast iron heat holding exhaust manifold with a low heat ceramic header? You'd need to research this but maybe get the OE manifold coated with ceramic. On second thought a MSA ceramic header would be easy and similar cost as removing the OE and having it coared. I've got them on mine and they do a fantastic job dissipating heat. My carbs are cool when I touch them. The reason I'm on California Datsun is simple. He does half arse work and charges top dollar. Your coolant passages could be clogged up with years of calcium deposits. I've rebuilt 2 motors and those were all clogged up. The casting plugs come out before the block gets vatted, if it did get vatted before the rebuild.
    3 points
  46. Been working on the videos for this Z recently. Here's the in-car driving video for anyone that's interested.
    3 points
  47. Beautiful engine, 180hp are good numbers but if you popped in flat top pistons and brought your compression up to at least 10 then the engine would really wake up with no danger of pushing it into unreliability
    3 points
  48. That looks like the Xenon air dam to me. They used to be about $160. Those days are gone.
    3 points

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