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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/28/2021 in all areas

  1. I've worked for 2 people, self centered narcissistic micro managers what's in it for me type for 35 years. I made a life improving decision to go to the corporate workforce and after two weeks I love it! When I leave I LEAVE. Nothing but family matters when I clock out now. They don't even know my phone number. I took a small pay cut but the nonexistent stress evens it out by way far. My beer and stress eating make up the difference plus some. Money is time don't jive anymore. How I spend my time is #1 now. So now my time is worth more than money to me as it should be to everyone else too. Smell the roses my friends.
    19 points
  2. Just thought I'd pop in to say I finally found an affordable alternative to my Zed! After test driving some BMW m3's and M2 Competitions, and considering a 911, I just didn't want to spend north of 50,000 dollars for a toy! Then I found this car advertised in Edmonton, and negotiated a good deal for the same money I got for the Datsun. A 2006 BMW Z4 M! I am loving the convertible driving experience, and it actually feels reminiscent of the Datsun, two seater, long, sexy hood loads of power from the beautiful sounding straight six! And, the wife now wants to go on road trips! It is admittedly much more comfortable for longer distances. The car seems to have been well cared for, 56,000 kms over 3 previous owners, it has a few scratches on the rear bumper, and the wheels have some curb rash and will be refurbished at the end of the driving season. No owners manual or service records though, I will track them down hopefully, car has been in Alberta all it's life. Fully vaccinated and heading to Jasper for a road trip this week!
    14 points
  3. Hello i am just back from the AACA Eastern Fall Meet at Hershey, PA. I entered my Z in the Historical Preservation Original Features class. In that class you are judged against a standard of originality. Anything restored or incorrect aftermarket gets a deduction. Used, NOS and OEM replacement parts are allowed. Owners are asked to disclose anything they know has been restored or modified. You are allowed up to seven deductions. Under that and you qualify for a HPOF award. My car is pretty much original but has had two minor body repairs/paint and the fuel line in not totally correct (correct routing but a new piece near the filter has been replaced using a Union. Not sure what the judges found (they do not tell you on the field.) I did not attend the awards ceremony that evening but I heard My car did get an HPOF award. it was a huge event…at least 500 cars on the showfield. From what I could see, Mine was the only Z, so it got lots of attention. Jim
    12 points
  4. To duplicate a post I made earlier on the UK site, I’ve been having a bit of fun doing back to back tests and learning about making YouTube videos - my kids want their own Minecraft channels, so I’m trying to learn with my version, I call it Zcraft! 😄 Ever wondered what an exhaust system would sound like on your car with different mufflers? I personally found that the internet was full small clips but very little in the way of back to back comparisons on the same car. Well, purely for your benefit, I sacrificed myself!!!! I will splice parts of these together one day when I get more time, so that the same bit is played back to back on one video. 1. Thrush / Dynamax 17715 Turbo Muffler (I had some SERIOUS hay-fever that day so forgive my lifeless voice). 2. Zstory Classic Muffler (forgive the jibe at you left-hookers) [ 3. Zstory JDM Muffler (forgive my boyish squeaking) 4. Zstory Street Muffler (forgive the camera mount that broke halfway through the clip). Let me know what you think and I hope it's helpful / fun. (To be very clear, I have no affiliation with Zstory nor is this commercial in anyway - it's just me having a bit of fun and sharing it with fellow enthusiasts!)
    12 points
  5. Hi guys. I figured I should start a build thread in here. The actual restoration is very close to being complete, but this seems like a good place to document a few things and perhaps ask little questions so I don't clutter up the main subforums with little inquiries when I can't find the answer. Anyway, this is about 93069, which my dad bought new in October of 1972 from Cardinal Motors in Jacksonville, NC. He was 21 years old at the time and just starting his senior year at NC State. The car's block number is 118555 and it has a built date of 07/72 (right around the brake system crossover). Original color: 901 Silver over red vinyl, dealer-installed factory air. Here are a couple of pictures my dad took in November of 1972, one month after he bought it: My dad had it repainted blue in the late '70s. My mom has always liked blue cars, so it's possible she had a hand in choosing the color. It seems rub strips were installed at that time also. I obviously remember the car all growing up. It was my dad's daily driver, and my brothers and I crammed into the back of it on more than one occasion, legs dangling behind the front seats, lying on our backs in under the hatch glass, watching the trees flick by overhead. Very unsafe, but it was a different time. The car deteriorated over the years. Battery acid ate a hole in the inner fender well and firewall, water seeped down and rusted out the passenger side floor pan. Rust started to pop up other places also, like the rocker panels and the trunk sill. My dad had the engine rebuilt in the '90s, and the carbs refurbished by the original owner of ZTherapy around the same time. I still have his "Just SU Carbs" and "240Z Tuneup" videos on VHS. Pretty nice viewing. I've always been into cars, but was never wild about the Z, which always felt weird because everyone I talked to said it was an incredibly cool car. Maybe familiarity just breeds contempt (or indifference in this case)? Who knows. Regardless, I got into wrenching about 20 years ago and have had a long succession of project cars (FB RX-7s, mk3 Supra, Type 85 Audi, various BMWs, etc), but found it hard to muster the motivation to start restoring the Z. Finally, about 10 years ago, I was at a point in my life where I had a place of my own with a 2-car garage and wanted to start bringing the Z back into focus. This was its state then: Pretty much a "barn find" in my parents' own garage. Dusty, rusty, mismatched tires, etc. I had chucked the bumper overriders years ago and managed to talk my dad into buying a set of slotted mags since he kept losing hubcaps. It hadn't run in 6+ years at that point. Back in 2005, I was driving it and the battery wasn't properly secured. It slipped off the its pedestal and impacted the oil filter, creating a nice gash (and minor fire, which I beat out). I was young and stupid and continued driving, trying to make it to the nearest auto parts store for a filter in spite of the fact that I likely had marginal oil pressure. The moment the engine started acting funny I parked it and walked the remaining 1/2 mile to CarQuest for an oil filter. I put it on and drove it home, but was scared that I had permanently damaged something, so I just let it sit. Fast forward to 2011, Stage 1 of the restoration was determining if it would run properly or if the engine needed a rebuild. I replaced all the consumables on the engine, had the carbs rebuilt (again) by ZTherapy and drained and resealed the fuel tank. Got everything hooked back up and after a few hiccups...it started and ran just fine. That was a relief. Stage 2 had to wait a few more years. I moved for work about 6 hours further away from my parents (they had been 1.5 hours away before), and took the Z with me. In early 2014, I partially disassembled the car, removing the engine and some other key bits. The next spurt of motivation came in 2016, when I finally got my garage organized and finished stripping the car down. In 2017, my dad came with a trailer and took the car back to his house to have the body restored. He took it to a local body shop to have the rust repaired and the car repainted its original 901 Silver. The body shop did an OK job. I wish I had been local in order to supervise the work more closely, since they cut a few corners, especially in the engine bay. Long story short, the car returned back to me for reassembly on Labor Day 2019. I was initially pretty intimidated by the task at hand, but started chipping away at it and it started coming together. I finally got it started again a little over a year ago so it could move under its own power to our new (local) home. Since then, reassembly has continued in fits and starts, but this is where it stands now: Still quite a lot to do, especially as regards the interior, but I've been pleased with the progress so far. Thanks for reading and stay tuned. -Matt
    11 points
  6. Nothing brings out the scammers like posting an ad in in the "parts wanted" section of the forum. I posted an ad a few days ago looking for a left front fender for my 73 Z project. Within hours I started getting bombarded with replies stating they had one in excellent condition. Just a few clues to be aware of so you don't get burned. See how long they've been a member. One reply I got the person had been a member for 4 hours, another one was a member for 6 days....red flag! Another clue is the stated condition is always excellent...we all know that if you can find one of these it's not going to be in perfect condition. Look at where the message is sent from...it's usually from some oddball source like tap a talk . Some offer to send pictures, but the pictures are usually ones copied from some other source. I had one that sent me pictures from a legitimate ad where I had spoke to the seller who informed me the part had been sold. If you call the number and connect with a real live person who speaks broken English it's more than likely a scam. I replied to one that left an email address. I replied a few days after I got his message...guess what? It came back as an invalid email address. Another red flag is the price is usually very reasonable and includes shipping. The last fender I bought, the shipping was more than the cost of the part. One way to help determine if its a scam (but not perfect) is to ask for specific pictures of the part. I usually ask for a close ups of the front and back of the area where the headlight bucket attaches. It's a shame we have to deal with these low life's. Too bad there's not a way we could screen them out. Maybe we can help each other out by posting detailed info any time we encounter a scammer. Remember the old saying, "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is". Paul
    11 points
  7. Congrats to @Mike on another year of a big bunch of Z Crazies still posting on this site. Another year of @siteunseen with a new computer.....kind of like giving a loaded .357 to a two year old, @Patcon with 2 projects that may never end......EVER, and @Jeff G 78 adjusting to the Arizona climate, and posting pics of a race car that needs to be eating oats with Secretariat!@Zed Headwill answer all of your questions and 85% will be correct. If you want to solve any electrical problems, the only person to contact is @SteveJhands down. @Captain Obviouswill still swear that flat tops are great......3000 1973 Z owners that switched are wrong lol. @HS30-Hwill poke at you till you finally admit that he is probably the most knowledgeable member ever! @Zupwill once again be the nicest member and @motorman7will continue to rub your nose in a before and after pic of every part of the Z anatomy until you feel like a total failure lol! @EuroDat, @grannyknot,will show up from time to time with some decent stuff and the rest is history. Sorry for all I missed......you all are awesome and Happy New Year to “What did you do to your Z today 2022!” Guy
    11 points
  8. Some outside photos of the Z.
    11 points
  9. You're in that weird area of talking like your "informed" but asking uninformed questions. Basically, your comment says "not really excited about doing things the way the Nissan engineers designed them and used for the full lifetime of the Z. I don't want to use the factory installed removal hardware that Nissan installs on every single engine that leaves the factory. " Think about that for a while. (TATFAW)
    11 points
  10. Great progress today on engine bay prep. Here’s the drivers side frame rail before...in between...and after. I used Eastwood’s 2k epoxy primer (thanks for the tip Jim) Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    11 points
  11. Today marks 15 years since I joined this forum. When I bought my brand new 1971 240Z 51 years ago I could not have imagined that I would still own it in 2022 and rely on maintenance advice and encouragement from a global community of Z owners. I would like to thank everyone who has helped and entertained me for the last 15 years, especially Cliff and Charles. Of all the car forums I follow, this one is the most friendly and helpful. I always feel that I leave with more than I bring. Thanks, Dennis
    10 points
  12. Orange you gonna tell us?
    10 points
  13. Sweet home Alabama! $100 🎁
    10 points
  14. Good evening All, All these years of working to turn three dilapidated 240s into one good cruiser has come with a lot of expense I'm sure that everyone on this forum knows what I'm talking about. But this evening I'm delighted to share with you that I have taken the first step towards recovering my investment. I had in my garage two trash-grade seats. The idea was to take them apart so the seat cushions and backrests would fit into my garbage bin. On two of them, I made a profit. Jammed between the seat cushion and the metal arm linking it to the backrest, I found money! A 1974 nickel and a 1981 dime are now safely in my possession! Finally, a return on my investment! I shared this news with Momma, but for whatever reason she did not share my jubilation. Cheers,
    10 points
  15. Update: I made it 1 month at Lowes. I hired in on a part time job, 30 hours max. A guy quit in the lumber department so I got promoted/demoted to opening lumber guy. The last week I worked 45 hours. People can't understand somebody that just wants part time work. I made some good (some bad) decisions in my life that allowed me the choice of working. "Work is for suckers" was what I learned. Anyhow after I worked out my schedule and left I was freaking out on keeping bills paid and my good credit score. The paint store I started working at in 1989 is were I work now. 3 blocks from my house and we sell Benjamin Moore paint. There's a paint shortage now so we're the only ones that have any. The store is busy, busy and we have ridiculous prices but that's what is sales for now. $12.99 in 1989, flat wall paint is now $29.99 for pastel base colors. We have some oil that's $80 per gallon. Prices are a whole lot higher but I'm back doing what I did in 1989. Life is good! (but strange). My life is getting back on track so I'll be able to dive back into my Zs addiction. Thank you all for putting up with me through a rough patch. Cliff
    10 points
  16. As I was thinking about this a bunch of memories passed through my head in voice over type thoughts. "Is this one exhaust or this one?" Do they just alternate from here? Exhaust - intake - exhaust - intake... No? Crap. The engine's tilted. Up is not Up". Is this still hot? Should I start over? It was perfect before I tightened the lock nut, now it's too tight. Does it matter if it's hard to get the feeler gauge in? Am I scratching the cam lobe with the feeler gauge? Where's my small sledge, I don't want to bleed anymore. #1 is a B___h! I should have wiped that oil off the edge before it dripped down the side of the engine. Wow, I really wacked something when the nut came loose. Hope nothing got bent. I could have just taken my time setting them cold, then rechecked them when they're hot. And that's just in the first hour.
    10 points
  17. Nothing as exotic as most of the entries in this thread but here is a little paint accessory I made this week to help in refinishing my steering wheel. It is the top of a 2 liter bottle with a nice fat bolt installed in the cap. It served as a stand for painting the spokes and hub and then it provided a spinner base to rotate the wheel evenly while spraying the spar urethane.
    10 points
  18. Finally got the car on the road today. Put about 20 miles on it and it ran flawlessly. Suspension is smooth, I have a small knock on the right rear in need to investigate when I’m bumps but it’s bad. Otherwise it’s running great. I need to attack my electrical gremlins next . Ride height with the Eibachs and Koni’s is perfect in my opinion. Here are some pics from today.
    9 points
  19. 1987 My first car purchase. Saved for 2 1/2 years
    9 points
  20. Hi all, I was able to complete the update this evening/morning without much of a hiccup. There were some back-end processes I had to get through to make it work but it's all done. At this moment you may see some delay as the database is continuing to rebuild the indexes. You will see a few new features and gadgets but the most prominent is the 'ranking' system. As the system is still rebuilding, I'm working on how this ranking system should be built. For the moment, every user has a newbie rank. This will remain until I get the overall structure to the ranks configured. Enjoy the changes, and now it's time for this guy to go to sleep... 3:30am. 😉 Happy Thanksgiving! Mike
    9 points
  21. That settles it. We'll establish the CZC base camp at Cliff's place. 😉
    9 points
  22. I'm the 55th poster on getting a keyed lug nut off. That has to be some kind of all-time record.
    9 points
  23. I got her running well enough to take it for its first drive, fun little car, went for a blast up my back road. A few rattles and vibrations I have to hunt down and need a new filler hose so ordered that today. The car is filthy from sitting in the shop since the paint job but you can get the idea of what it will look like when she's all shiny again, very pleased with the height, just where I like it. Don't want to look like a boy racer.
    9 points
  24. I just bought my new Z! RabbitZ! Added to my garage [1]! Yay! I’m thrilled! [1] Rabbit - https://www.classiczcars.com/garage/vehicle/1912-rabbit/
    8 points
  25. Celebrating 51 years of Z-ness together today.
    8 points
  26. I just want to take a moment to quote this post, and say that the document - marked 'Secret', no less - which Kats obtained and showed us here some years ago, seems somewhat underappreciated. I think it is dynamite. Probably the single most telling piece of official documentation relating to the genesis of these cars I have ever seen. It is, in my opinion, something of a Rosetta Stone... It has it all. Dated 25th June 1969, and with a big 'Hi' stamp (for 'Himitsu'/Secret), it is titled ''270 Kei-sha C/# Dakoku Yōshiki', and it gives us the type designation, purpose, company department destination and actual identity of the first fourteen cars in the project to be given full chassis numbers. First of all, there's no 'Datsun 240Z', 'Fairlady Z', 'Fairlady Z432' etc etc here yet. We know that the project was nicknamed 'Maru Z' (Z in a circle cipher) and was given the internal project number '270 K.K.' ('270 Kaihatsu Kigou'), a glimpse of the terms being used within Nissan just before production. Personally I always wondered where the '240Z' name came from for the Export cars, as it doesn't seem to make much sense ('2400Z' or '2.4Z' might seem odd to us now, but they are certainly more logical) and I am convinced that the '270KK' project code is what actually inspired it. The '240Z' name was a late assignation, after 'Fairlady Z' was rejected for the Export cars. I think the '270' code inspired '240Z' when a name was required at short notice. Secondly, it shows us that - quite logically - 'S30-00001' was the first '270' project chassis to be given a full series identity. 'S30' was the designated series number and the S30-prefixed models of Fairlady Z and Fairlady Z-L were key parts of the family tree. This was how Nissan structured the variants of other models too; a good example would be the C10-series Skyline, where C10 was the series and C10-prefixed models were the building blocks for the structure of other variants in engineering and documentation. Thirdly, and I think this is particularly interesting, the second car to be given a number is described as being an 'HL270' variant. Naturally, with LHD exports being a key part of the whole project, we would expect this to be a North American market type variant. However, that does not seem to be the case. That 'HL270' designation would appear to show it as being a general export LHD variant. So 'HLS30-00001' looks to have been what we might call a 'Euro' LHD type variant. The third car is a 'P270' variant - the 'P' indicating the S20 twin cam engine - and it was given chassis number 'PS30-00001'. Fourth car, first of the 'Ichiji Seishi' cars and destined to be a 'Soko test' car, has an 'HL270U' designation. That 'U' suffix would - according to Nissan's usual habit - indicate a North American market type variant when applied to an 'HLS30' prefixed chassis number. This was 'HLS30-00002'. We then get 'S30-00002', given the designation '270C' (or is that '270L'?). Certainly there's a distinction between this car's designation and the designation of 'S30-00001'. I'm guessing that one is a Z-L (Deluxe) and one is a Z-S (Standard)? That fits with Nissan's modus operandi too. Or does it possibly indicate a factory AirCon car...? Seventh car to be given a number, and the 4th 'Seisan Shisaku' car, is an 'H270U' designated variant. That would mean RHD Export type, and it was 'HS30-00001'. Another 'Soko test' car. So there they are. The first fourteen numbered cars. We are extremely privileged to see a key internal planning document of this type (thank you Kats) and I would say it deserves a thread of its own, and a little more recognition.
    8 points
  27. I also got my freshly painted front air dam and hood grills on.
    8 points
  28. I finally got my valance, Air Dam and hood vents back from paint. Came out great. Unfortunately I told them to hold off on painting the 3 valance pieces. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to keep the Xenon air dam or go back to stock. The message apparently didn’t get relayed to the painter so I had to pay for all of it. It’s fine, now I can go either way later on if It gets damaged or I want to got back to stock.
    8 points
  29. I started wet blocking with 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500, finished that up yesterday and started cut and buff this morning, one more day and I'll have the paint done😊😊😊
    8 points
  30. Have to add my 2 1/2 cents to this thread, as the lucky new owner of this beautiful automobile. cw240Z72 is not only a master craftsman but a great guy, having had the pleasure to meet him at his home/workshop this week. Who but a mechanical engineer could do computer based drawings and 3D printer recreations of hard to source parts?! Too nice to drive.....but too bad! This car is going out on the road, and down to the local cars and coffee in the near future. Then "date night" with a girl I've known for a (long) while. Eagerly await delivery..decided I'd better not drive it home during the winter months. And thanks to all who posted here along the way.
    8 points
  31. If you have a project that requires a few days of uninterrupted time (no one will get near you) print this out or PM me your number and I'll send it via text message. When you're finished get a negative test result and resume the hustle and bustle we all live with. You're welcome!
    8 points
  32. Today’s mission was to install the rear bumper. Had to drop the tank and got it all bolted up. Left the drip edge on for now. Took it for a spin, and it ran great. Here is a video so you can hear the ZStory Classic Muffler. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    8 points
  33. She’s in!!! My 14 year old son helped me. Just the two of us.
    8 points
  34. She’s alive! Didn’t take much to bring it to life. Slight rattle from the resonator in the background. A part from that sounds healthy, good oil pressure and no leaks. Few tweaks and she’ll be able to move under her own power and begin the break in process.
    8 points
  35. Greetings all, new member joining. Just picked up a green 71 Z. Seems to be all original, (no rust😁) with 69k miles, other then a repaint about 25 yrs ago. Planning to fix all the seemingly minor issues. Car has been sitting for many years, about 3k miles over the 34 years. Car actually runs pretty good considering it’s been parked for so long. Sitting in it seems like a throw back in time. Previously owned a 74, 78, and a 82 many yrs ago. Can’t wait to bring it back to life.
    8 points
  36. I thought I would take content from a post in my "build thread" and share it more broadly here. I've been working to prepare almost all of the hardware for my 6/1971 240z for re-plating, and have learned some, improving my process along the way. Here is some example hardware I ran through the process this week: These hose clamps are in pretty average condition after 50 years. Note that the less rusty one has some common damage on the phillips head. It has been mangled a bit. Something I have learned is that you can restore most philips screws with this type of damage by tapping the area with a hammer. I place the bottom end of the screw on the flat surface of my vise, and then use a hammer with a smooth face to tap on the top of the screw, working the metal back down where it belongs. I chose this one as an example to show that even when mangled this badly, decent results can be achieved (more pics below). So, here is a description of the process. Use these glass beads from Northern Tool and Equipment, important for size of grain, and bead blasting at 90 psi with a 1/8th inch nozzle to remove all rust, and to establish a consistent finish. I use one of these baskets and find that putting a variety of hardware (big and small) is great for trapping the parts in place so I can blast them without them flying around too much. For large parts, you don't need to use the basket, and you can then go back over them with the pressure at 50 psi to put a smoother finish on them. This smoother finish allows "second stage prep" by hand with less work. After glass bead blasting, all hardware (bolts, washers, nuts, screws and odd small bits) then goes straight to tumbling in one of these vibratory tumblers. I now use a stainless steel media (bought from Southern Shine Tumblers on Facebook). See pic below. It consists of tiny little bits of stainless steel that are good at getting into tight spaces, like between threads, phillips head recesses, etc. And I now use it dry. I was using water and a bit of citric acid, but I think that is best for doing brass shell casings. I was fighting keeping the parts from starting to oxidize/rust, and have found that the media works better and faster dry... to put a nice finish on the hardware. Minumum time in the tumbler is about 2-3 hours. You can add 2 to 3 times that and get an even nicer finish. For large parts that I can't tumble, I use a Dremel tool and the little wire wheel brush attachments after the glass bead blasting (first) step. For final, more consistent finish, I follow that wire brushing by hand rubbing the large parts with #0000 fine steel wool. It doesn't take a lot of work at that point by hand, but the combination of using the Dremel followed by fine steel wool by hand does end up taking some time. After hammer and top of vice on the screw head, then after glass bead blasting - with comparison to head that was not damaged, and lastly, close up of bead blasted texture: After tumbling, the hardware has a dark grey look to it. After wiping with lacquer thinner, the repaired screw in the second and third picture here is notably lighter in color. Sanding the top of the screw briefly with 320 grit or 240 grit would have been a good idea before tumbling, as I see some surface imperfections, but the screw looks pretty good compared to its initial state. Most of the screws I have done this to were not in as bad a starting point as this one. If you want to get the same media, send an email to Southern Shine Tumblers first to inquire on pricing and availability: southernshinemedia1@gmail.com They accept PayPal.
    8 points
  37. Datsun ... We are Driven Myself and Zup live up to that slogan! Departed Saturday morning with a overnight stop in Amarillo Tx. Had some great steak at the famous Big Texan. Off the next day to complete the trip to Colorado Springs, (about 1600 miles roundtrip) arrived safely with minimal bugs embedded in the front end in the afternoon. Got a little dicey going over the high pass south of Colo Springs, all the carbed cars I saw struggled with the altitude change and Zups flat tops were no exception. CO and Wayne came in Wed night and we had another steak dinner Thursday. Zup's son and his girlfriend were at Zcon which was great for him. All in all, a great time. Here are some random pics Got a thumbs up from John Morton Garden of the Gods
    8 points
  38. Yeah. How many Z car forum members DOES it take to remove a locking lugnut? At this point, I'm done dispensing advice and only here for this thread's entertainment value
    8 points
  39. Plenty of beer wisdom too. I should change my last name, eh? -Cliff Clavin
    8 points
  40. I don't know if this qualifies as a tool but it's going to be very useful to me, My shop has a bit of a slope leading up to it. A car that is running can just drive in but most of the cars that come in can't do it under their own power so I tow them up with the lawn tractor but have to stop 10-15 ft. away, then hook up tow straps and pull the car in with a come-along. A long and tiresome job, so I picked up a 12v 3,500 lb winch, built a base for it, hook it up to a battery, hook the battery charger up to it and turn it to Start. Lots of juice flowing and pull the car into the garage in seconds. I love it! Less work for my old back.
    8 points
  41. 14 miles on the car! Went to Touge Bash at Stratotech in Fort Sask and won a Top Tier award!
    8 points
  42. Been helping a friend with his 280z, redoing the fuel system, correcting a number issues contributing to the heat soak common problem. Waiting on a new fuel tank from S30 World, decided to quit early today and ran out of table space in my shop for beverages. Found a new use for those big crash bumpers and went All Cliff on it. A tribute to him, I know he likes those ice cold dogs... @siteunseen
    7 points
  43. Driving a 240Z today surrounded by gigantic SUV’s and Pickup’s, all too often driven by distracted drivers - I’m beginning to think Automotive Air Horns or even Train Horns are a good idea.
    7 points
  44. Stacked some more high build today
    7 points
  45. Well, I had some challenges today getting the engine started but phoned a friend “Captain Obvious” and he steered a mere mortal like me to success. First we had no spark, we narrowed that down to a bad ignition unit on my ZX distributor, put in a backup then we had spark but no ignition. Fuel pressure was 35psi. I couldn’t smell fuel so we guessed that the injectors were not getting power. Had a old fuse link on the injector power that goes to + side of battery. Put the link on a multi-meter and it had higher resistance that expected. I had just bought a new one from Banzi Motorworks (didn’t want to install earlier incase if I had a bad connection I didn’t want to burn it up. ($38 part). Put that one one and it fired up. Here’s a link to a video of it starting and running after I got the timing set and idle adjustment close. Thanks for all the help! You guys are awesome! I owe Bruce more beer!!! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    7 points
  46. You are probably on a forum with the most gracious, kind and helpful people you will ever encounter on a car forum. The regulars on here are highly experienced but also very forthcoming with advice tips and a myriad of other virtues. In life you get what you give. When you have concerns about advice given or published in the Nissan manual its fine to ask why but it’s really not a good idea to try and respond with a underhanded or sarcastic comment. I think is is a good idea to search the forum, read the details of your area of concern. If the answers don’t satisfy you or you have questions it’s absolutely fine to reach out and get clarification. Honestly Siteunseen sent you the link to everything you needed, he did the search for you. Being on a forum is no different than walking into a conference large room where you get to raise your hand and ask a question. I’d ask you how you would approach that in real life? Maybe something like “Hi, my name is Dam I own a xxxx Z that I’m restoring and have a lot of questions and was hoping someone could steer me in the right direction on a engine removal technique “. We’ve allowed social media to change the manner in which we deal with people and we need to take a step back and treat social media interactions the same as you would real ones. Its a problem of this new social media world where are all in and where it’s okay to say something you’d never say to someone’s face....Something to think about ! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    7 points
  47. Have not posted much over the years but I am scrambling to make it. Trailering the car from Ohio. Spent 5 years working on the car with no finishi line in sight so Imma just slap it together and get her to pikes peak on her 50th birthday. Still got paint and final assembly to go. I'll not be sleeping for the next few...
    7 points
  48. This weekend I removed the headliner and surrounding padded vinyl trim and A-pillar trim. I had a little anxiety about doing this as they are are in very good shape. Luckily all came out with no issues and will be reusable, including the foam padding. I took lots of pictures of the joint details to help when I reinstall. Here are some pictures of my process, the only tools I used were a 1.25" paint scraper with corners rounded off and an awl. I started at the lower end of the A-pillars and carefully peeled back the vinyl exposing the foam padding. In some areas I could do this with just my fingers and other areas I had to use the scrapper to break away the adhesive as I pulled. When I got to the vinyl over the door opening I used the awl to break the adhesive as space was limited. For most of the length the foam was glued at the edges to I had to go very slow using the scraper gently while keeping light tension on the foam. There is also U shaped welting that holds the vinyl to the roof frame that had to be pulled away. After removing the A-pillar and over the door opening trim I used the same process for over the windshield opening. For the headliner I found that there was no adhesive where it tucked into the roof frame but there was a very uniform coating of the adhesive on the rest. To get started I poked my little finger in to the hole for the LH visor mounting bracket pushing the unglued edge of the headliner and at the same time gently pushing inward with the fingers of my other hand until I had exposed the edge of the headliner foam. From there I could work the unglued edge out of the frame for the full perimeter. I freed the headliner using the scraper with a short jabbing motion, keeping light pressure on the roof and holding the headliner with light tension with my other hand. I had the scrapper at about a 30 to 45 degree angle to the roof while doing the scrapping. Using this technique very little of the foam was damaged. All in all it when quite smoothly and there was very little foam reside left on the steel. It was definitely worth taking my time to be able to salvage everything.
    7 points
  49. Cleaned up the rear wheel wells with soap and a scrub brush, turned out pretty good. Dealing with the mustache bar now, to get the differential in place so I can adjust the bushing on the new TC front mount I bought. I've read a few mustache bar links here, pro's and cons of replacing the bushings, the nonexistent serrated rubber washers, etc. The bushings in mine seem good, not too hardened, so I don't want to replace with poly for now. The washers on the other hand, not so fortunate. While cleaning in my solvent tank some of the rubber nubs fell off, and a few were already missing. I know these are no longer available, but was wondering if anything has changed in the last couple years since those last posts? It seems to me that these washers only come into play as the differential attempts to twist, and there's an 1/8" gap between them, IMHO they're just added insurance in case of complete bushing failure. I suppose with a healthy engine there would be occasional contact, especially with new soft rubber bushings. I could be wrong. Anyway, just wondering what others are doing for the washers for the stock rubber bushing setup. Fabricate your own? Motor mount washer substitution of some sort? Use as is and forget about it? On another note, I wish the TC mounting bracket had a little more clearance next to the brake/fuel line bracket! I did ground out a little notch for added room, but just another 1/8" more in that dogleg bend would have been really helpful. I had to use a bottle jack to wedge it into place. [emoji53] And, got most of the fasteners decently plated using my home Caswell system, not perfect. About 4 hours work here for cleaning and plating.
    7 points
  50. This is a pre-oiler I put together yrs ago, I use it for every engine rebuild just before start up or on engines that haven't run in a long time. The air hose attaches to the nipple I welded on, 2 liters of fresh oil goes in the canister, oil filter on the outlet hose, usually I screw the fitting into where the oil pressure sensor goes. Fill it with 90psi and squeeze the handle, the entire oiling system is filled including the engine oil filter.
    7 points

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