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SteveJ

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SteveJ last won the day on July 30

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About SteveJ

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    Gainesville, GA

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
    260z
  • About my Cars
    73 240Z
    74 260Z with Patton Machine EFI

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  • Website
    http://FiddlingWithZCars.wordpress.com

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  1. There is wiring in place for an electric fuel pump. Follow what I posted, and we can help you. I haven't messed around with the electric fuel pump wiring on the 240Z because my 240Z has the modification that Nissan designed for that year. However, I do understand the FSM, and I'm trying to guide you on how to figure out how to wire it in. Please go back and read post #6.
  2. I believe it goes to a hard line to the engine bay. If I'm correct, it's represented in this drawing by vapor vent line. This is from EC-15 in the 72 FSM.
  3. I started putting the seats back together last night, but I ran into a glitch. I counted and recounted the screws, and I found I was 1 short. The wife made a Home Depot run today to get a M8x1.25 machine screw and some 5/16 star washers. I used the new screw on the first seat, and as was putting the second seat together I noticed I had an extra screw. Apparently my counting skills were not what they should have been yesterday. So the seats are together and ready to go into the car. I'm going to pull the center console first because I want to replace it. The replacement console is sitting
  4. Here's an alternative: https://www.amazon.com/Jack-Sealey-Valve-Spring-Compressor/dp/B000R9ZITC It was mentioned in this thread:
  5. The green is usually related to the black/white. There is one green that is downstream of the fuse for the black/white in the fuse box. There is another green that branches off the black/white for the fuel pump. So, how can you tell which green wire this may be? Pull the middle fuse on the left side of the fuse box. Set your meter to continuity. Check each wire for continuity at the connector with the black/white and green wires to the right side of the middle fuse. See photo. For each wire that did not have continuity with the fuse box, check again but with the
  6. Here's a photo of the 240Z version of #13. I don't know why the parts catalog says you need 4.
  7. If you want to know why the Z32 looks the way it does, the best thing to do is go to a ZCON where Toshio Yamashita (aka Yamasan) is presenting his story of the design. If you saw the competing designs, you might say that Nissan picked well. Anyway, Nissan did have a more affordable sports car (sports coupe) at the time. The 240SX/Sylvia slotted in well to the old 240Z role except for the lack of an engine in the North American market to keep up. Of course, with the strong Yen at the time, it was about impossible to have a sports car built in Japan that was "affordable".
  8. Well, the ammeter is also held in by the wires going to it. Make sure you try this with the battery disconnected.
  9. You could post photos or look at what RockAuto has. It's probably the same sender.
  10. I installed the Nissan door striker latch. After a little adjusting, the door closes and latches just like it should. Before I did the install, I asked the wife to pick out which latch was stock and which was aftermarket. She picked the wrong one, but I thought it was for good reasons. We compared the two, and she pointed out some details that I didn't noticed on first inspection. The Nissan latch is on the left. The aftermarket latch comes down too far at the top, and it looks thicker on the left side. I'm thinking that it may not allow the striker to come in far enough to latch re
  11. The leak is at the seal of the piston where the silver shaft goes in. Only air can leak out. The hydraulic seal is functional. Apparently it is still safe to use like that, but the new part should be sent out. I don't mind having to replace it myself. It's a pretty straightforward procedure from what I can tell by looking at it (and from the email the support person sent). I have to undo a couple of bolts, remove the bad cylinder, slide in the new cylinder, put the bolts back, put air in the air cylinder, and bleed the hydraulic cylinder. I don't envision taking too long.
  12. I wonder if that's a California thing with Kroil. I ordered it from Amazon in the past without being a "Business Member", and I had no problem with putting it in my cart today. Do you have any friends in Arizona who could order it for you and smuggle it across the border in case you need it in the future? 😉
  13. Well, the QuickJack support team is quick to respond. With a couple of emails back and forth, they were able to help me find the air leak. Now I am waiting on the remedy. Once the QuickJacks are operational, I can drain the gas and replace the tires. I might leave the car up in the air with the new tires until I finish so I don't flat-spot them. Parts are arriving today. I only had aftermarket door striker latches in my parts collection, so I ordered what I hope is a Nissan version from Z Car Depot. I also am expecting the banjo bolt filters for finishing off the carburetors. On M
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