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cgsheen1

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Everything posted by cgsheen1

  1. There are two adjustment pots on the back of the gauge for syncing the needle with the sender. Ya, that's why no one does it...
  2. I have three - used - so I guess you can count me as hoarder... (no blacks, one white, no reds, but three yellows...)
  3. He was an awesome guy. In my former life I got to do some plumbing repair work at his house. He had to take me to the garage and show me the SHO he just got from Ford and tell me all about it. We Datsun nuts here in Arizona got to see his Z car up at the Williams, AZ Datsun show a few years back. I'm sure he'll get a good pit assignment up there...
  4. Nope, just stuck in the replacements (I felt I'd gone through all other options), fired it up, and watched the AFR's. AFR came back inline immediately so I heaved a huge sigh of relief. We had already checked every other part of the EFI. With the injectors all looking new(ish) and the nasty end of the plugs all looking the same, I didn't suspect injectors.
  5. Our experience with POR-15 is that it adheres ridiculously well with metal surfaces when it's applied as they instruct. It was developed to adhere and encapsulate rusty surfaces in a marine environment. They have several products for conversion and encapsulation you might want to look at. We've used it on Z car floors, under cowls and fenders, in wheel wells, and in the area that you're trying to protect as well. But, keep in mind that we're in Arizona so, not a lot of wet here... POR-15 is UV light sensitive but in the areas I've talked about it doesn't require a protective top-coat.
  6. Ya, we pulled the injectors and fuel rail and used the ECU. I suspected a few clogged injectors (I knew that they were all opening or at least "clicking") but when they all fired properly and filled the graduated cylinders equally, it obviously wasn't that. The injectors on his engine look relatively new - green top hose type - but they need to be flow tested on a real bench and perhaps resized. The ultra lean condition immediately disappeared when I installed some "known value" injectors. Young Kurtz has done an great job with help and advice from you guys! His undercarriage looks amazing and he has accomplished a great deal. We're going to finish up a little engine work for him and he'll have a nice 280Z to cruise around in.
  7. View Advert 1975 280Z "museum car" for sale Bob still wants to sell this 1975 280Z. This is the car we had up on BAT in 2019. There have been a few modifications since then. The bidding on BAT went up to $27,000 which didn't meet the reserve. This car has 4,800 original miles. It is almost all original and in excellent condition. Since then we installed a Nissan stereo radio - this wouldn't have been offered in 1975 and is out of a later model 280Z. We also removed the bumpers, pistons and bumper trim and installed "Euro or JDM style" thin bumpers - stainless steel with no holes. Bob had us install an aluminum radiator when he first brought the car to Arizona which caused a bit of a stir on BAT. We removed the aluminum radiator and installed a stock brass radiator. The story behind the car is this: It was originally purchased in Pennsylvania and traded in with relatively low miles to Thompson Toyota in Doylestown, PA. Thompson Toyota kept it in their collection until 2013. They sold it to the current owner with a dealer verified 4,000 miles on the odometer. I have the paperwork. It now has a clean Arizona Title ready for transfer. The original wheels, tires, and hub caps will come with the car. It has the original spare tire in the well. It is currently on new tires and alloy wheels. All the stock bumper parts are in excellent condition and will come with the car. Even though I've only put up 4 pictures from the BAT auction time period, I have hundreds and can take current pictures for anyone interested. And I'll answer any questions as quickly as possible. Personally I don't think of this as an excellent, original, low milage 280Z - I look at it as an excellent starting point. The buyer will never need to look for interior pieces or replacements for worn out weatherstrip, or trim items, The car has rarely been on the road so the sheet metal, undercarriage, frame rails, and entire unibody are in excellent condition. As are all the lights, lenses, and exterior trim. Gauges, switches, wiring and connectors are all nearly perfect. A great platform for whatever future modifications you want to make. I'm not posting a price - I'm open to serious offers - but keep in mind the final offer on BAT... Advertiser cgsheen1 Date 11/10/2021 Price Category Cars for Sale Year 1975 Model 280Z Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) HLS30-211146  
  8. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Bob still wants to sell this 1975 280Z. This is the car we had up on BAT in 2019. There have been a few modifications since then. The bidding on BAT went up to $27,000 which didn't meet the reserve. This car has 4,800 original miles. It is almost all original and in excellent condition. Since then we installed a Nissan stereo radio - this wouldn't have been offered in 1975 and is out of a later model 280Z. We also removed the bumpers, pistons and bumper trim and installed "Euro or JDM style" thin bumpers - stainless steel with no holes. Bob had us install an aluminum radiator when he first brought the car to Arizona which caused a bit of a stir on BAT. We removed the aluminum radiator and installed a stock brass radiator. The story behind the car is this: It was originally purchased in Pennsylvania and traded in with relatively low miles to Thompson Toyota in Doylestown, PA. Thompson Toyota kept it in their collection until 2013. They sold it to the current owner with a dealer verified 4,000 miles on the odometer. I have the paperwork. It now has a clean Arizona Title ready for transfer. The original wheels, tires, and hub caps will come with the car. It has the original spare tire in the well. It is currently on new tires and alloy wheels. All the stock bumper parts are in excellent condition and will come with the car. Even though I've only put up 4 pictures from the BAT auction time period, I have hundreds and can take current pictures for anyone interested. And I'll answer any questions as quickly as possible. Personally I don't think of this as an excellent, original, low milage 280Z - I look at it as an excellent starting point. The buyer will never need to look for interior pieces or replacements for worn out weatherstrip, or trim items, The car has rarely been on the road so the sheet metal, undercarriage, frame rails, and entire unibody are in excellent condition. As are all the lights, lenses, and exterior trim. Gauges, switches, wiring and connectors are all nearly perfect. A great platform for whatever future modifications you want to make. I'm not posting a price - I'm open to serious offers - but keep in mind the final offer on BAT...

    NO VALUE SPECIFIED

    Phoenix, Arizona - US

  9. That's been so long ago that I don't even remember. I was going to do that but I don't have a fuse cover and didn't remember which fuse. Good call, because I wouldn't have remembered that either. Disconnecting the connector to the wiper motor removed the short so maybe I'll start by plugging in another wiper motor and see what happens. However, I'm more inclined to believe it's in the intermittent wiper timer electronics...
  10. This morning I jumped into Goldie to head to the shop and when I turned the key, the windshield wipers twitched. This has never happened - switch was off, but they jumped just a bit and stopped. I thought it was weird but continued to back out of the garage. I noticed my volt meter (ya, Goldie should have an ammeter being a 260Z, but this was a turbo swap from the beginning of my ownership - with a ZX alternator - so I eliminated the shunt right off and replaced the ammeter with a 280Z volt meter / fuel gauge) Anyway,, I noticed my voltmeter was dropping to 8-9 volts momentarily and it was doing it in a rhythmic pattern. Drop for half a second and go back to normal for 3 or 4 seconds and repeat. Tried the wipers, no worky. Tried to think of what worked in a rhythmic pattern like that and couldn't come up with anything but the intermittent wiper delay. Yup, stopped at the Quickie Mart and unplugged the wiper motor under the hood. Weird voltage glitch went away. Don't know YET what actually caused it, but will be checking through the wiper circuit(s) when I get a chance. Goldies wipers hardly ever get used cuz: A. Arizona... 2. Even though she's my daily driver, I don't ever drive in the wet unless I absolutely have too...
  11. Personally I would clean that area as thoroughly as possible and make sure the weep area was clear. Then I would pour rust modifier in-between the panels, letting it soak all surfaces and seep into the pinched seam and drain out the weep hole. Once that was complete, I would do the same thing with POR-15 making sure it coated all surfaces and sealed the pinch seams - again draining out the weep hole but making sure it stays open. Weep holes and drains are an incredibly important part of managing moisture and I would never eliminate or purposefully block them. (My son thinks you should separate the two pieces at the rear of the fender, then do the above, then put them back together using seam sealer. Probably involves a little cutting and welding... Important part of that is sealing both surfaces in there and keeping the weep hole open. POR-15 is stupidly effective.)
  12. Looking at that in Clayton's car, I thought those were separate pieces. His drivers side has the tunnel-to-dash-frame piece but no finisher bracket.
  13. This 280 in the shop only had the right side bracket...
  14. There is no "play" there when the engine is turning. The play you have there is only because the cam isn't in a spot where it's resisting the crankshaft motion. Roll the crank a bit clockwise and it'll tighten right up. Then check for chain stretch as per the FSM and linked above. But, if you're that far into the engine already, replace the entire timing set. When the engine is running the tensioner isn't just using the little spring inside it - it's using oil pressure to keep tension on the chain. You can't really mimic that with the engine apart and there's really no need to.
  15. The Fuel Pressure Regulator is supposed to maintain a fuel pressure differential of 2.5 Bar (~36.3PSI) between the fuel rail and Intake Manifold Pressure. So on a running EFI engine, fuel pressure is not a static value - it (constantly) changes with manifold pressure. If you have 10 PSI of vacuum, the FPR is going to pull 10 pounds of fuel pressure. Likewise if you're making 10 pounds of boost it's going to add 10 pounds of fuel pressure. To verify the correct fuel pressure on a running engine you need to know the value of both fuel rail pressure and MAP (manifold absolute pressure) at the same moment in time. The fuel damper is installed to smooth the output of the stock fuel pump which squirts fuel in pulses rather than a steady even flow. Injectors work better with a steady even flow. Must be a little important, and nearly every modern EFI car has one too (probably much more critical with todays emissions engines than it was back in the day). That's if it's still working properly after 40+ years... The stock FPR held fuel pressure even when the engine shuts down, so the fuel pump must also check fuel flow back to the tank. I've noticed that most aftermarket FPR's don't, and that also includes most adjustable FPR's. Did you ever say why you think your fuel pressure is a problem?
  16. No one, I hope... Just me, but I really don't like the 280 "bulb" valence with the 240 style bumper - screws with the line of the headlight bucket. To my eye, the bumper above is also too "high and tight". It accentuates the bucket / valence offset rather than minimizing it if it were a bit lower and protruded a bit farther. Well,,, You asked!
  17. Easy way to check the gauge itself is to ground that YELLOW wire with the ignition on. It should peg the gauge to F. You don't need to let it go that far, if the needle moves the gauge is good. The wiring and fuel level sender are easiest to check with a multimeter reading the Ohms value between the two contacts on the sender. You can do that at the sender itself, at the connector under the hatch, and at the yellow wire going to the gauge in the dash. The fuel level sender is a "variable resistor" (and built like a rheostat) - it's resistance value changes with the level of the float. As long as you can read a resistance value (ohms) between the yellow wire and ground (black wire) the fuel level sender is probably okay. (the gauge is expecting a certain range of resistance between empty and full so that could be an issue) IF the gauge is good then you need to check the sender and the wire path between the sender and the gauge.
  18. From the web: Place the 1-quart container in a well ventilated area. Pour the oleic acid into the container. If pure oleic acid is unavailable, Murphy’s Oil Soap may be used a substitute, as it is essentially the same substance, and works well as an ingredient in clock movement cleaning solution. Add the acetone to the oleic acid. Slowly pour the ammonium hydroxide into the mixture of oleic acid and acetone. Do not pour too quickly, or the mixture will splatter. Ammonium hydroxide, 26 degree Baume, is a common, commercially available preparation of ammonia. The 26 degree Baume refers to the strength of the solution, and is equal to a solution that contains roughly 30 percent ammonia by weight. Let the mixture stand for a few moments after adding the ammonium hydroxide. Clumps of soap-like material will begin to appear on the surface of the mixture. Lightly cover the opening of the 1-quart container. Do not seal it airtight. Leave the mixture in the container for about two hours, or until the clumps have completely settled out into the mixture. Pour one gallon of water into the large container. Add the contents of the 1-quart container to the large container to form the clock movement cleaning solution. Things You'll Need: 1 quart container 4 ounces oleic acid 8 ounces acetone 12 ounces ammonium hydroxide solution, 26 degree Baume Large container – 5 quarts or more 1 gallon water Tip If using the clock movement cleaning solution in connection with an ultrasonic cleaner, dilute the finished solution with an additional one quart of water. If making larger or smaller amounts of clock movement cleaning solution, increase or reduce the ingredients proportionally. Warnings: Wear rubber gloves when working with ammonium hydroxide. Avoid breathing in the fumes. Simple, ya? Actually there are pre-made clock cleaning solutions available and most people also use an ultrasonic cleaner. That works for cleaning the movement parts if they haven't been damaged and/or not excessively worn.
  19. Ya, you could run a jumper from battery to flasher - but you're bypassing the fuse. I wouldn't. I don't know anything about the electronic flashers but from it's description, I don't know why it wouldn't work. Other people use them. But, is there a specific way they have to be wired? Is one pin dedicated to voltage INPUT and one to voltage OUT? NM, I just saw that the "X" terminal is for the GREEN wire and the "L" is for the WHITE wire... Look, the hazards work, yes? Then the issue is somewhere between the fuse and where the turn signal switch connects to the dash harness. Stop wondering about everything else. You need a dual filament bulb in the 240Z Park/Turn Signal housing. It has to be a dual purpose bulb. (If it works with the hazard switch, it'll work with the turn signal switch)
  20. The Hazards and the Turn Signals work on two different power sources (because the Hazards work any time and the Turn Signals only when the ignition is in the ON position...) Power (battery voltage) for the Flashers: Battery -> Ignition Switch -> B/W to Fuse Box -> F (flasher) Fuse Box terminal -> Green wire to Hazard Switch -> G wire to Turn Signal Flasher unit under steering column -> White from Turn Signal Flasher unit -> bullet connector Green wire to Turn Signal Switch. The green wire on the switch is connected to the center of a "tetter totter" inside the switch. When the lever is in the middle (off) position, neither side "touches the ground" and no voltage travels through the switch. When the lever is moved, it pushes one side or the other down to make contact with two "points, or contacts" that deliver voltage to two wires - one takes power to the front turn signal bulb, the other to the rear turn signal bulb. That's true of both the right and left sides. The flasher unit (not a relay) works using a wire wound around a bimetal arm that "makes" and "breaks" the circuit as the bi-metal heats (and bends) and cools (and straightens). It uses a "resistor wire" that heats up as current goes through. It does so fairly quickly giving you the familiar "blinking" light feature. That's the old-skool way. An electronic flasher does it with a solid state timer circuit and accomplishes the same effect. The same Green wire from the "F" fuse terminal also powers many of the gauges I believe. Have you tried removing the flasher unit and "jumping" the green and white wires together? That should just remove the flashing effect and light the turn signal bulbs solid while you have the switch in the right or left positions. To eliminate the hazard switch as a possible problem, just unplug it and jumper the two green wires together. The wiring that goes out to the bulbs all ties together in the dash harness - the turn signal and hazard switches use the same wiring and connectors within the dash harness(es) so... If the hazards work, the wire and connectors (dash to engine harness & dash to body harness) all must be intact so you're looking in the right places - switches, flasher, associated wiring and connectors.
  21. 240Z? Looks like fuse box piece from bottom side...
  22. I am the bubble. I am the bubble. I am the bubble... Nope. Didn't help. I guess I'm just not Zen enough. 😝
  23. So, here it is. The bleeder is tapped and drilled at an angle. It enters the wheel cylinder NEAR the top... The brake line feed is drilled perpendicular and enters at the center of the cylinder. I think Cap has it with his excellent Fluid Dynamics instruction.
  24. Tomorrow I'll be replacing rear cylinders - discovered that my left rear was leaking yesterday. Two new rear cylinders are being delivered to the shop in the morning... While I don't know if the bleeder comes off the top top, I think it's an optical illusion to believe it's on the bottom and there are cavities inside that could retain air during the bleed process. That goes against everything humans building cars have known about hydraulics for the past 100 years.
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