Jump to content

IGNORED

New member needing some opinions


Dadson

Recommended Posts

Hello, I’m new here and have been looking at a lot of different Z communities to figure out where I belong. I joined here mainly because of the way I’ve seen questions answered by experienced members to the non-experienced (like myself). Helpful and not condescending like I saw on another forum. A little background on me: My son has always loved classics and I took him to a classic car show earlier this year. He was hooked and wanted to do a project. So the username “Dadson”. Thought that was a fun descriptive play on Datsun. We looked at a lot of American muscle but I kept gravitating back to the early z cars. Fast forward 9 months and here we are. We bought a 72 240z out of Az and had it shipped to Tx. It was built 9/71 and is matching numbers. Some rust in usual places but is mostly original. I’m a woodworker and fixer of everything but I’m not a mechanic. So, I’m going to need some advice and “how to” on things I can’t figure out. A couple of questions to get started:

1. My interior is red and the seats are like a velour type fabric. I haven’t seen any pictures of fabric seats on other z’s. Was wondering if this was a certain package that was offered.

2. My shift knob isn’t wood like most. It is definitely old so, was wondering if it could be part of a different package. It looks like it is made from the same material as a pool ball. It isn’t a ball, it is shaped like a wooden one but clearly a different material.

3. Restomod - I am going to have to do at least 1 mod and that is an AC. From a value perspective, how concerned should I be by making some mods like AC etc. I think I really want to keep it as close to original as possible but I have to have AC in Tx.

 

Trey

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have more pictures of the body? There looks like there is overspray on the door latch, was the car repainted? vertical defrosters? or is that something in the background?

Woodworker eh? Add a custom shifter to your list of projects.

IIRC AC in an early Z car was a dealer add-on, but you might be able to find bits and pieces of one from a 72-73 and make it work. 74+ cars have a different HVAC system. Some people (including me) went down the route of `Vintage Air` systems, essentially it replaces the whole HVAC system under the dash with a new unit. On a 240z its easier to take apart the switches that come wiht the vintage air unit and retrofit them into the HVAC panel for an OEM look, @qz16 has the cleanest vintage air control panel setup I've seen. But you're venturing into modification territory there.....

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you add a "factory" style AC unit, no one will know if you dont tell them, because there are no existing build sheets. AC in the early cars was a dealer add on, as mentioned but they all are the same unit. The only problem is they might not cool well enough for you on TX. Somebody else might be able to chime in on that.

One of my earlier cars had seats like that, I don't know if that was a dealer ad on or not.

Since there are no build sheets, you have some freedom with the car as long as you stay in factory style things.

I never worry too much about modification as long as they are easily reversible

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the group and I readily agree with your comments about the quality of feedback and support from this bunch as compared to some others. Simply put - you won't find a more helpful group of enthusiasts on the interweb! We do enjoy our friendly banter and sometimes wierd humor but you won't find flames and ridicule here.

Here is a current restoration thread on the forum that has some super good A/C aspects. I know the poster personally and can assure you he will answer any questions about his installation: https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/64674-restoration-of-hls30-12070/

I have a build sheet from my resto project 10 years ago that might be of help in identifying parts that could be candidates for repair or replacement.

We are all voyeurs at heart and love lots of pics so we'll all be looking forward to your progress reports.

Jim

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the group!

As mentioned, seats appear to be recovered.  There are sources for reasonably priced original style vinyl replacement upholstery which is a good DIY project.  Shift knob should be wood - reproductions are available if it's important to you.  There are a few AC options and as mentioned, AC on early cars was a dealer installed or aftermarket option.  If you want to go "old school" with the AC you'll need a clunky York compressor unit - I did this in 1972.  Current kits use a smaller and more efficient rotary unit - I replaced my York system with a rotary in 2007. I live where daily summer temperatures range from 110º to 125º and it cools the Z adequately.  A louver unit on the hatch glass is nice for blocking the sun and keeping interior cooler.

Keep. us posted on the progress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have read somewhere in AZ cloth seats were a desirable addition done by dealers or aftermarket because the vinyl gets super hot in the sun.  As someone one that lives here I can agree it can get to burning you levels really quick when you sit down  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome, Dadson! Funny, I saw your username last night and thought, "Huh, that's nice - how have I never noticed it before?" Turns out you're brand new! As someone relatively new to all this (z's and wrenching in general) when compared to most other members, I can solidly attest to both the knowledge and hospitality of the people on this forum. Have fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, Thank you all for the replies. Yes, the car was repainted (terribly) at some point. Not a big deal to me because I knew whatever we bought was probably getting a paint job. I was hoping the seats were original and something rare. Interesting about a possible dealer add in AZ. Would like to explore that. The fabric is in excellent condition and comfortable. But, it has a lot of sun fading. Was thinking about getting it re-dyed. I will probably turn a new shift knob on my lathe and see what I end up with. Does anyone know what species of wood was original? Great information on the ac and mods. Maybe I shouldn’t worry too much as long as I stay close but make it reversible…. Yes, I have the vertical defrost on the hatch. I heard that is harder to find. Other ‘72’s I’ve seen were horizontal. Maybe since mine was built 9/71 they hadn’t switched yet. Every piece of glass is original and chip/crack free. Yesterday was its last day on the road until we are finished with the project. Had to get it inspected so I could do the title work. We sandford and son’ed it up to the station and passed! LOL.
So now the real work begins. Since it is going to get a total paint job back to its original, my understanding is everything comes off and is just a roller when I bring it to a shop. I feel good about most of it but I’m pretty Intimidated about the dash and wiring. Is Removing everything for body and paint where I should start? Here’s a few pictures.


‘72 240z Kilimanjaro white vin 473XX

IMG_1370.jpgIMG_1371.jpgIMG_1311.jpgIMG_1310.jpgIMG_1309.jpgIMG_1308.jpg
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome and nice car, Dadson.  I also have a 9/71 build date car, HLS30-46372 (original owner), and it, too, has the vertical defroster grid found on the '71 models.  I though that mine was a rare bird in that Nissan was likely using up a few old parts in the early '72 models.  But your VIN looks to be about 1,000 units after mine so it seems there were more than just a few leftovers.

My car came off a rotisserie earlier this year and is now undergoing restomod to become a 5-speed, triple Weber 45 carbs, 3.2 L stroker, 3.90 R200 diff beast (with Vintage Air A/C) and I'm hoping to get it back on the street this coming spring - depending on how cold the Ohio winter is going to be (unheated outbuilding).

First bit of advice: take a LOT of pix before you begin removing bits and label, label, label.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot dang - that is one fine looking car! The quick and simple answer to your paint prep questions is YES - everything comes off for a good paint job. Bag and tag everything immediately as you remove it, don't rely on your memory. Become the zip bag king of your neighborhood! 😉 Throw nothing away until the replacement is installed. String tags are messy but effective at tagging both ends of electrical connections before they are pulled apart. Get some plastic tubs for your take-off parts and try to keep items closely associated in storage. Build a running "needs list" as you remove items that will need replacing. You can be acquiring the replacement items while the car is off at the paint shop. +1 on the lots of pics recommendation.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use a Sharpie and write the contents on the Ziploc baggie. That wears off fairly easy so write the contents on a small piece of paper and drop it inside the bag. Made my rebuild easier to put back together when the time came.

Nice looking early '72. Glad you're here on the best forum.

Cliff 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Excellent advice on bagging and tagging. I already bought a bunch of ziplocks and index cards. Will follow your suggestion on string tags for wiring and pick up more totes. I hope to start the disassembly this weekend. Lift question: I’m looking for a used lift and found a guy that retired his auto mechanic shop and now just does inspections. He has a 6k lb scissor lift that he will sell me for $400. Seems there are pros and cons to all lifts whether 4post, 2 post, scissor etc. would getting that scissor lift allow me to do most work I need to do? I hear the aren’t good for transmission and exhaust, but if they are good for suspension and most other stuff, $400 seems like a bargain.


‘72 240z Kilimanjaro white vin 473XX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great point on harness identification. No paint lined up yet. I’m going to talk to one hopefully tomorrow. I have a friend that is an insurance adjuster that I want to get some referrals from. Maybe I should slow down a little to line that up. Thanks!


‘72 240z Kilimanjaro white vin 473XX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I  have found that most shops dont want to paint classic cars. Almost all of them.

The main stream shops that will, end up regretting it in the end.

Shops that do classic cars many times specialize in mustangs or mopar or whatever. That leaves our Japanese tin out on the cold. Also these cars are thin and not as forgiving as beating on a 50s or 60s American car.

An adjuster might be able to provide good leads. You could also go talk to some auto body supply shops ( finishmaster, S-W auto, etc) If you can pull the store manager aside and get a discreet recommendation preferably without witnesses ( you will get better honesty this way without the risk of offending customers) that would be my preferred method.

I have also found that the paint job can take 2, 3 or 4x's longer than originally quoted. Collectively known as " paint jail"...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to know. I definitely don’t want to be in paint jail. I will work on lining that out first and maybe they can get me on the schedule. Any opinion on the scissor lift? I probably need to make a decision tomorrow before he offers it to someone else.


‘72 240z Kilimanjaro white vin 473XX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the lift, are you talking about a QuickJack?  I have a BL-5000SLX that I bought new through Home Despot (yeah, Despot) for about $1,000 almost two years ago.  I see they're running $1,400 now.  Works fine for my Ford Flex and girlfriend's Nissan Murano.  If that's being offered at $400, take it.

Haven't used mine on a Z yet but, when I do, the lifting will be done along the frame rails running down the entire car.  I had Bad Dog frame rail "boosters" welded in during the rust repair prior to painting as I knew I'd be running higher torque than what the original L24 put out.  Plus, I just love a stiff car on a twisty road.

Regardless of my rambling on, my point is: DO NOT LIFT YOUR CAR THE FIRST TIME USING THE ORIGINAL JACKING POINTS.  Those are likely to be very weak if there's even a hint of rust in the old girl.

Get some 6-foot lengths of 2x4 and cut them to the length of that bodywork between each side's wheel wells.  Then, put some latex paint along the bottom edge seam of the car and carefully press the 4-inch side of each board into that seam to transfer the paint.  Then, when it's dry, router a groove along that paint line deep enough to accommodate the seam and then use those boards each time you want to raise the car using that lift.  You could could even glue some old carpeting along the flat to protect and cushion the bodywork.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Dadson said:

Good to know. I definitely don’t want to be in paint jail. I will work on lining that out first and maybe they can get me on the schedule. Any opinion on the scissor lift? I probably need to make a decision tomorrow before he offers it to someone else.


‘72 240z Kilimanjaro white vin 473XX

Advantages of a scissor lift:

  1. Very sturdy. It's great for wheel/hub work including brake jobs.
  2. Can lift higher than a QJ.  (I also have a QJ 5000)
  3. Less guessing about jackpoints than a 2-post. I used 2-post lifts often when I was in the Air Force. The thing I miss most about the military is the Auto Hobby Shop.

Disadvantages of a scissor lift:

  1. Sits high. I have the car on 2x12s over the lift so the exhaust doesn't hit.
  2. Most are difficult to do centerline/transmission work. I did replace the driveshaft with the car on the scissor lift, but draining/refilling the transmission was a pain since I had to lie on one of the bottom crossmembers.
  3. The crossmembers can get in the way of simple things like placing your catch pan under the car for an oil change.

Just one thing, if the scissor lift does not have locking points as you lift, you do NOT want it. A safe lift should have locks that require the operator to disengage prior to lowering.

Edited by SteveJ
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, jonbill, yours looks like my QuickJack except that your two sides are linked whereas a QuickJack is two independently moveable sides so there's nothing on the ground between the two sides and i can move around freely.  But yours lifts a lot higher.  My QuickJack will only go 18 inches or so unless I use extra cribbing - and I do sometimes.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.