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  1. This is the original fascia nut and odd looking squarish washer that came out with it:

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    One of the captive nuts on the fascia on my car was stripped out so to fix that I made my own captive nut by cutting a rectangle shape out of a repair metal from Thrifty hardware and drilling and tapping it for the 4MM original machine screw. I used a bench grinder to make the new nut have the same size as the original and to have the beveled edges the original has.

    The existing machine screw size is 4 MM and according to my drill and tap sheet the drill size to use for tapping is 1/8" (or 3.3MM) which worked well. The fascia nuts I had were stripped out bad enough that I could not be sure what the pitch was so I won't list that to avoid posting inaccurate info.

    The existing captive nut can be easily removed by prying open the two metal retainer strips that are in front of and in back of the nut that hold it captive. I had to use care to pry the strips just far enough so that the stripped nut was removable as otherwise the new nut would want to fall out if the strips were sprung out.

  2. Mike
    Latest Entry

    Just wanted to share some photos of my Z over the years...

    This photo is just after I bought and rebuilt the engine.  I drove it around through college.  At the time, I purchased the car from a family friend who was storing the car in his garage.  Purchased for $500 with a frozen engine block, bad head gasket, and seized brakes.

    MY-Z4B.jpg

    After a few years, and the first split with my ex, I decided to 'man-up' and start taking the car apart.  I spent the next several years sand blasting, with a gravity feed blaster, and disassembled the entire car.  I then took her to a body shop of a guy in Corvallis, Oregon.  he did the unibody work and painted the inside.  The drive-train and brakes were installed so I could push it around in the garage.

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    Soon thereafter, I re-united with my ex and we moved to a place in Albany, Oregon where I managed to get some more work done and the car painted.

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    My Z then sat in this state for 4-5 years, neglected in the garage while I went through some even more challenging "life" situations (new house, final divorce, etc, etc)

    At one point, I ran into Steve Epperly from Ztherapy at a club outing.  After hearing my story, he brought about 6 guys to my house and proceeded to take my car to his shop for restoration.  This process took about a year.

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    Until finally one day, he called me over and said, "Your car is running, do you want to see it?"

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    We fumbled around with the car for another few months until Steve went to the Portland Roadster show and showed off the project for all to see.

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    I then took delivery of my baby and drove her around to various different events and functions.

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    I must say, without the support and encouragement of the Z community, this project never would have happened.  Our cars may follow us through a lifetime, but, its always rewarding to sit back and appreciate the accomplishments.  Sometimes I just go sit in my Z and stare at all the wonderful parts surrounding me.  Thank you to everyone for all the support over the years, I wouldn't be here without you.

    Mike

    IMG_0116 (Large).jpg

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    Just Got the engine bay primed in my 1975 280z. Will try to paint on Sunday. Maybe I will have the engine in soon!

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    msawaya1
    Latest Entry

    I have a 73240z with L28 motor 4 speed I want to put a 5 speed i heard a 83 280 zx tars works good any ideals

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    TheNateums
    Latest Entry

    This is my 240z. She is an 1971 so she doesn't need smog, so I removed all the emissions equipment day 1. Sadly this car is also kind of shared too, haha, my dad and I did all the work, him teaching me along the way. He put a lot into this car too so I consider it just as much his as it is mine.

    As Purchased:

    I got it for $1000, primer yellow, running, but barely, not drivable. Completely stock as far as I can recall. Needed a lot of cleaning up but was not necessary to do a hard core, tear it all out and start from scratch restoration. Oh yeah, and it came with some beat up classic Recaro seats!

    This is after we already did alot of mechanical work and swapped rims

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    Mechanical/Performance Work Done (in chronological order as good as my memory serves me):

    Remove leaky SU Carb

    New OEM SU Carbs, then remove due to lack of ability to keep them balanced

    New Intake Manifold

    New 440cfm Holley Carb

    Custom Cold Air Induction

    Ditch Cold Air Induction, place K&N round filter on top of carb

    Performance Ignition Coil

    Remove Stock calipers and rotors

    4-Runner 4 piston front brake calipers and rotors

    Remove rear drum brakes

    New Aftermarket Stage 1 rear brakes

    Oversized brake master and slave cylinder

    New Clutch master cylinder

    New Header and custom built exhaust with twin tip

    New Konig 15x7.75 lightweight bronze rims

    w/ 245/55 directional performance tire (can't remember brand right now)

    Replace Shocks/Springs

    Eibach shocks & racing coil-overs

    New MSA Sway Bar

    New Adjustable Tension Rod

    New Adjustable Control Arms

    Allegedly Rebuilt 5-Speed out of a 280z (definitely not rebuilt)

    ... More Coming Soon

    Body/Style Work Done

    Dash Cap

    Cast Aluminum steering wheel

    Alpine stereo system

    replace inside leather door panels

    Bullet style chrome mirrors

    new leather visors

    new mats all around

    installed secret hatch compartments from later models

    fixed all electronics! Except clock, pos...

    Shaved and smoked turn signals

    custom panel round tail lights (corvette or Skyline style)

    aftermarket front bumper and fog lights

    removed rear bumper sissy bar

    replaced rear 1/4 panel (only rust hole on the car)

    Painted with rattle cans a flat black! (Yes, spray paint! looks amazing! My dad is an artist with a rattle can!)

    Needless to say it has come a long ways, but still isn't done, it has mostly sat for the past 2 years since I moved down here but once my parents move this summer I will be forced to begin the project again.

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    More current and early pictures of the car coming soon

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    hls55@yahoo.com
    Latest Entry

    Hello all

    I have a chance to purchase a 76 280 z (We are moving and must get rid of our '76 Z car. The engine had been disassembled by our son when in HS 7 years ago and put back together somewhat. We think that all of the parts are there. It has been on jack stands since 1992 in our garage and under car covers but there are several dents in the body due to carelessness in the garage.The engine has about 110,000 miles on it.) As you all can see the car has been on jack stands for 16 years. will it be super expensive to reserect a car that has sat that long? I also want to know how hard or easy the car would be to work on . I owned a 81 Datsun 310gx and it was very easy to work on I would assume this car would be no problem also.Thanks for letting me ask a question or 2 . look forward to hearing from you folks.Jeff

  3. ConchZ
    Latest Entry

    Been a long time between posts, due somewhat to relocating to Kansas City, MO for a job transfer. Miss Key West, but KC is nice, and most of my family are here. I can also afford suitable housing, with lots of garage space, making it easier to work on the car and store parts. I just noticed it has been two years since I got the paint done. I had a few initial problems with the paint, but once those were fixed, it has held up great for two years now. I just removed the gas tank to solve a leaking vent hose, and was very pleased with how rust free the underside of the hatch and insides of the quarters and rear panels looked. I don't think the car will ever be finished, though. Seems there's always something needing fixed, or at least improved upon. I guess that's why I bought it, something to do for a hobby. Interestingly, the car came from Wichita, so its much closer to its original home. Maybe I should look up the guy I bought it from. I never met him, as I bought it from Ebay. My friend checked out the car for me and handled the transaction.

    Time for new tires, as they are about 7 years old and hard as rocks. Good tread left on them, just old. Time to make a final push to solving the mysterious rear end clunk, too. Replaced bushings, mount and u-joints already. Wish they would have come up with a better design. Speaking of design, what the heck were they thinking on that fuel tank? I think there were 7 fuel and vent hoses on it, none of them the same size.

  4. i own a 1973 240z ive started with an engine swap 2jz also a 1jz transmission... now i wana lower the car but not sure what suspensions to use? and what do they mean by psi or lbs?? im currently using 17inch wheels and the tires are 17/40.. im looking for adjustable coilover.. tnx

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    Just curious how long the members have owned their Z cars. I bought my 71 ,#12164 in 1973.

  5. Blog Denny

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    I am rebuilding the top end of a 72 240Z engine. I have an E31 head and have removed all the equipment on the block and am cleaning it for painting. (I noticed after cleaning the grease off that it is a light blue color - I never knew that!)

    The last major work I had done on the car was when the Wizard of Z's (Riverside, CA) was still in business before he retired. The Wizard did a marvelous job on the engine, it really purred!

    Since I didn't need to smog the car any longer because of its age, the Wizard asked if I wanted the smog tube hooked back up to the intake manifold. He said it would give me more power so I said no, don't hook it back up.

    More than 10 years later, the engine has a blown head gasket, which is the reason I am working on it now. Since the Wizard is no longer there and to save money, I am doing it myself.

    The question I have is, is there a reason to put the smog pump back on when I get ready to put it back together?

    Thanks!

  6. Blog omega Z

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    I have a 1971 240Z, I'll looking for an honest ans reputable mechanic in the Kansas City Area, can anyone help. I'm having problems with my timing chain. Thanks

  7. Blog lenponz

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    lenponz
    Latest Entry

    I've just scored 2 Z Cars for $600.

    75 280 & 73 240

    Both are junkers. Plan is to stripthe drive tran out of the 280.

    get some body parts from the 240

    :bulb:

    Any suggestion

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    We are looking for a mechanic in the San Francisco Bay Area, preferable Marin County, that can work on a 1972 240Z. Our previous mechanic retired. Can you recommend anyone?

  8. Blog 83Turbo

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    Can anyone tell me where to find a am/fm-cd radio that will fit in a 1973 240z?

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    a club member found this car sitting,and stopped to check it out. talking with the previous owner,he learned that the car was going to be sold. taking pictures,getting the owner's name and number,he posted the info incase any club member might be interested.

    the history of the car, if correct as told by the p o is that it was being driven by the Datsun owner's son, and two years old when he bought it. the car was driven for approximately ten years, showing 108 k miles on the odometer when i looked at it. the p o had a wreck, sliding on ice into the back of the car in front of him, and then had someone rear ended him as well. he claimed the damage was minor. the hood was rolled under and both bumpers missing from the car. with the clutch slipping at the time,he decided to just pull it into the garage and fix it back up one day. and it sat for around twenty years, untouched, until i found it and bought it. the p o had purchased new bumpers for both front and rear, and had never installed them. i got them still in the package, along with a over ride bumper for the rear,when i purchased the car.

    we had to take the rear wheel off and bust the drum, as it was frozen and wouldn't roll, so that the car could be loaded on the trailer. i had an idea of throwing fresh gas in it, new plugs, and rebuilding the brakes, along with a new clutch, and driving it right away. how wrong i was in that i have now spent two years fixing and replacing parts, so that i could have a daily driver to depend on. i wanted to do everything as best i could, and pay for as i went, so that when i finished, i would have a nice car, and not owe any money on it. so that explains the time period of getting it driveable.

    i was extremely lucky in finding a club member doing a v 8 conversion, who had a engine with round top carbs for free, all i had to do was drive two hours to pick it up. and he even loaned me his cherry picker to load it. we decided to go ahead and just rebuild his engine, since we were swapping the four speed tranny for a five speed, i saw no reason to worry with keeping the original engine. i know there are club members rolling their eyes, wondering why i have ruined an all original,numbers matching car, and all i can say in my defense, is that i wanted a good dependable car, which would easily cruise on the interstate, and handle these ozark hills and curves.

    at the time, i was driving a '88 300 ZX SS, and loved it. it was a really nice car, but the wife didn't see it as something we needed since it only was a two seater. we still have one child at home. also, i had the wife driving a '92 Nissan Sentra at the time, one i had worked out of for the last ten years, and handed down to my daughter, who now drives a '93 300 ZX vert. a deal we made, the wife and i, buying a new home, making do with an old car, that lasted all of two years, and she was not happy with the Sentra. so i sold the SS on Ebay and purchased the wife a used Maxima SE, which worked out great so far. and now my older son is driving that Sentra with 400 k miles on it back and forth to college.

    back to the 260Z, hope i didn't bore you too much with all of the history and such. now we took the donated engine, tore it down, and had it boiled. it cleaned up really nice, and everything looked good as far as a rebuild. new time kit installed, and all of the originall parts were put back in. we did have the head machined, and valve seats installed for unleaded fuel.

    the suspension was tackled next. i had ordered a set of Tokico struts and springs off of Ebay. also a set of polyurethane bushings from Black Dragon. we dropped everything out from underneath and cleaned it up with a wire wheel brush on a grinder, and sprayed it all flat black.

    the car being wrecked, we found more damage than i had been told about by the p o but after an extra day of beating, pulling, and such we had everything back straight and all was good on the frame.

  9. Blog KirkgZ

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    I need your help again. You have helped before and I have been grateful for the info. I need to know now if you can put 15 inch wheels (custom) 4 lug on a 1973 Datsun 240Z without problems. Help please, and thank you. KirkgZ

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    smokingwheels
    Latest Entry

    How All Started

    Some time in the year 2000 my neighbor gave me a cylinder head (AB7)?

    It was off a Nissan 4 cylinder L series engine.

    A friend of his gave me a 1983 bluebird wagon with a faulty carbie.

    I used the block out of this car for my 1983 Bluebird sedan.

    In my spare time I ported this head and a manifold that I had.

    In 2002 I installed the good block from the wagon and the cylinder head into my 1983 Bluebird.

    It fired up ok took it for a test drive wow it was really responsive.

    I had 33 cc in the chamber approx compression ratio 12.5:1

    I found just by depressing accelerator to the floor I was able to create wheel slip in 2nd gear, going around a typical right-hand corner at normal speeds I was pleased.

    But the timing was really out when the revs where up past 3000.

    This engine had a very short life.

    *

    I ended up destroying this high compression engine, because of the timing characteristics that was needed to run it.

    *

    The strange characteristics.

    I found by revving this engine with no load above 3000 Revolutions Per Minute (RPM) it made a terrible knocking/banging sound like all the bearings were not there, but the block was in good condition before.

    The knocking/banging sound was constantly there when driving the RPM was over 3000 RPM.

    I had plenty of power under the hammer I was pleased with my work.

    The correct spark plugs for this engine would only last 3 days.

    I started replacing the all the high voltage components; the result was a slight improvement but short lived.

    I ended up reducing the compression ratio to 8:1 in 2002 I did know what else to do.

    I had discovered a way to run a spark ignited (SI) internal combustion (IC) engine several degrees After Top Dead Center (ATDC), all thought I did not realize at the time.

    *

    I connected timing light and started to investigate.

    I found the only way to silence the noise was to retard the timing back to 3 to 4 degrees Before Top Dead Center (BTDC) this was when the engine revs were over 3000 RPM, with no load on my engine.

    With the standard mechanical advance it then caused the timing at idle to be totally wrong.

    When at idle which is ~22 degrees less this engine would not idle, because it was being fired ~18 degrees After Top Dead Center (ATDC) which is extremely too late in the power cycle to achieve Peak Combustion Pressure (PCP).

    I now know from my 2nd engine the vacuum advance needs be approx in an 18 degrees range.

    *

    *

    I started to think.

    I could make a computerised ignition system I had a Laptop.

    I built up an interface for the printer port.

    I built the first interface with 2 transistors and 2 leds 6 resistors on a piece of veroboard soldered on the end of a DB 25 way connector .

    I bought 2 kits from altronics to try and tune the engine.

    1 was the high-energy ignition kit and a programmable ignition controller that would allow a negative slope, however I found this was not good enough for my Engine.

    I then started to write a program in BASIC, the first one was just to delay the spark.

    It didn’t work very well but it did stop the knocking above 3000 RPM.I worked on the programs all night to try and overcome this timing problem.

    I quickly got a program to work and have been improving it till now (7 years).

    I had to grind out the locating keyway on a rotor button to allowing the timing signal to be advanced so the computer could takeover

    I had to manually enter the timing every 25 RPM into data statements.

    I gathered data over the next 8 months after lowering the compression to 8:1 in 2002.

    My engine died and I threw out but I should of kept the head.

    *

    *

    *

    Peak combustion pressure (PCP) needs to be achieved by the time the crankshaft is 17-19 degrees ATDC according to research I have done on the Internet.

    The second engine is now running with an advance is approximately 15 degrees BTDC at 3000 RPM with WOT.

    The timing drops with carbon build up thus is very unstable in the long term but if it keeps going we will end up firing after top dead center (ATDC) again.

    *

    I’ve found on many sites From Information stated that a knocking engine will quickly destroy the pistons and bearings etc

    Yet I was not able to melt my pistons even with 22-25 degrees to much advance.

    My engine was run with extremely heavy knocking AT WOT up to 6500 RPM through the gears to over 120 km/h on a hwy lots of times and never melted anything,

    But I was hammering the life out of the crankshaft and other parts below.

    *

    I would need to build a 3rd engine and do more tests.

    Assuming current data would be similar in range on previous engine at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) the original head may have been timed (fired) as late as 14 degrees ATDC above 3000 RPM and still achieve Peak Combustion Pressure (PCP), it’s a rough guess at best.But it’s a slippy slope estimating timing on the down side of the power stroke when no one has done it before. *

    *

    After suffering many personal hardships.

    I then moved to my sisters in Huntingdale and continued to improve my timing program.

    *

    In 2005 had the courage to start this project again.

    To work a head and manifold on another L series engine.

    *

    I got it all together in the 3rd quarter of 2005.

    Now with the second engine a mild version, the data that I have gathered it now indicates that there is approximately 30 degrees of vacuum advance, on a cold night.

    *

    I'm building a web site

    http://ampair.tripod.com

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    Does anyone know the whereabouts of one Isaih Taylor? Sent him funds through PayPal months ago for the exshaust he supposedly was custom building. He did respond to a blog and left a contact number,however has previously doesn't respond to e-mails and phone numbers are non-working. No product Lost Funds Not Happy Can anyone Help?

    Thank's Bill:ogre:

  10. Blog Zmax

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    I have a 240Z racecar and I am looking at fitting a VQ30DE into it, does anyone know of one of these conversions, thanks.

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    I saw a link that was about an oil additive that prevents all wear of engine components. This oil additive lubricates the cylinder walls during cold startups. Never use synthetic oil again. This oil additive

    is amazing. It beats prolong and a multitude of other additives.

    I know a distributor that sells this product for $16.50 per bottle.

    sfrcorp.com/demonstration

    If you like what you see on this 11 minute demo, contact me @

    gleason_d@sbcglobal.net

    titaniumspine

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    I wanted to do that too. It takes an 82 Maxima with the electronic over drive. I know that you have to change drive shafts as well. Do a search on this site, I think you will fi.nd the info you need.

    I've done this swap in my Nissan Cedric 1978 year model.

    You'll need:

    The 4 speed flexplate,

    An overdrive rocker switch to lock out O/D

    A modified crossmember.

    A modified tailshaft (shorter and different spline than the original)

    Some slight transmission tunnel adjustments (read, make larger at some points where the trans touches the tunnel)

    These are things that i had to consider and do to make things work, you may have some of these issues with your S30 cars...dunno, never owned one myself.

    A worthy modification IMO. Good luck mate, Cheers. :)

    PS My 4 speed auto was from an R30 Skyline with an L24...it was a hydraulic box. Some later ones are electronic. That may need more work to set up the electrics but I don't know about this, as I said, mines hydraulic.

  11. I will warn everyone up front that this is likely to be a long post. When I decided to install braided fuel lines in my 260Z I did not find a lot of info on this on the forum' date=' so I thought that I would write up my experience so that others wanting to do this could benefit from what my son and I have just completed.

    I had been planning to change out the old rubber fuel lines in my engine compartment with braided SS for some time, and also did not find a lot of info on the site for this upgrade. I did contact Frank in Houston (D240zx2) who has done this and received some good guidance from him, but ended up having to make some design mods to make this work with my late model 260Z.

    The primary reasons that I wanted to make this change was to:

    1. replace the old worn rubber lines

    2. re-configure my electric fuel pump so that it would run at any time that the car was in the "on" position

    3. add a more precise and better mounted fuel pressure regulator

    4. bring individual fuel lines to each of the triple Webers I have installed

    5. improve the overall look of the fuel distribution system in my engine compartment

    With the triple Webers on my car I have found that after prolonged periods of non use, the car was very diffcult to start. I believe that this was caused by a low / no fuel situation in the bowls of the Webers due to evaporation, and wanted to develop a solution that would allow me to pump fuel to the carbs without waiting for the mechanical pump, which seemed to take an excessive amount of time.

    So I put a plan together for the installation of a new electric pump, new pressure regulator, fuel log, as well as the SS lines themselves.

    At the start of this exercise both my son and I were complete novices when it came to AN plumbing and I found the multitude of different plumbing options to be very confusing. So I did quite a bit of research on this topic and found the following site to be very useful in terms of tutorials as well as a source for many of the products I needed to complete this exercise:

    [url']http://www.anplumbing.com/

    I also found that actually putting my plan down on paper with all of the necessary components was extremely useful as you could easily see all of the different adapters, connectors, etc that were needed for the installation. I have attached a PDF of the document that represents the final install that we completed over the weekend so hopefully this will help anyone else that wants to try this.

    There were 3 primary challenges to this project:

    1. learning the ins and outs of AN plumbing

    2. electrically connecting the new fuel pump by utilizing the existing wiring in the car

    3. going from the OEM fuel hard lines in the engine compartment to an initial AN fitting

    I already mentioned a few things about basic AN plumbing but one other key thing to note is that all of the fittings utilize a 37 degree flare as opposed to the more common 45 degrees which I believe is used on standard NPT fittings. In order to connect to the existing hardline, you will need to flare it to mate to the appropriate 37 degree connector. This requires that you have a 37 degree flaring tool. (Sorry if this is boring to those that may already know this).

    Next the fuel pump.

    So on my late 260Z, the OEM fuel pump was configured to only run when the car was in the "ON" position and the engine was running at a minimum of 600 RPM's. Unfortunately this configuration did not allow me to address one of the key issues I was trying to solve, which was the abilty to pump fuel to the carbs with the car in the ON position but not yet running. I used my FSM to unravel the rather complex factory wiring and was able to locate the power wire that was routed to the OEM pump from the relays installed above the fuse box on the passenger side of the car. I ended up tapping into this and powered it through an inertia switch which I located in the glove box, so I still maintained the safety of killing the pump in the event of an accident. Now the pump will run anytime the key is in the ON position. Challenge #2 solved.

    The third challenge was actually the hardest and my son and I spent 3-4 hours getting an AN adapter on the stock OEM line. (I decided not to replace the hard lines all the way back to the tank as my lines were in pretty good shape). Unfortunately I was not 100% sure of the size of the OEM line, but I measured approx 5/16 inch with calipers. I didn't really know if this was a true 5/16 or some close metrric equivalent. I ended up using a "tube nut" and "tube sleeve" from Earls that supported a 5/16 inch hard line and it was a perfect fit. At that point we thought we were out of the woods, only to find that the hard line where we were going to connect had a slight bend in it and the sleeve would not slide over. We ended up having to cut the hard line further back (on top of the frame rail) where we had about 3-4 inches of straight pipe and could get sufficient room to install the nut and sleeve and have room to make the required 37 degree flare. This also proved a little challenging as the space was very tight and the flaring tool barely fit, but we managed to make it work after 3 or 4 tries. We did have to remove the clamp which held the fuel line as well as the 2 OEM return / evaporation lines to get enough room to make the flare but this was relatively straight forward.

    After that was completed, it was pretty much smooth sailing. We ran adapters / lines up to the new fuel regulator which we mounted where the carbon canister had once been installed. This was a perfect spot for it and the holes were already there. My son fabricated a bracket for the fuel log which we mounted on the center mounting studs of the intake manifold. I was a little concerned about heat and vapor lock with this position, but so far no sign of that and I hevan't even installed the heat shield yet.

    A few other noteworth items:

    1. It was really hard to find a fuel regulator that supported the low pressure required by the Webers and had the AN fittings I was looking for. I finally located one on Summit Racing (P/N 220065)

    2. The inertia switch I used was sourced from Advanced Auto and is made by Intermotor (P/N S9300). It was a little pricey at $80 or so, but I felt that this was worth it for the safety it provided.

    3. I found a fuel pump that was nearly identical to the OEM one from Datsun and supported a pressure range that was consistent with the Weber requirements. It is made by Facet / Purolater (P/N FEP 60SV)

    4. I needed an inexpensive flaring tool and found one also at Summit Racing under their own brand.

    5. Finally, althouhg I am very happy with the results of this project, I will say that the AN pluming parts are very expensive. I believe that I spent somewhere in the neighborhood of $250 for all of the bit and pieces I needed as well as the SS hose itself. I would do it again, but just a warning for those who may not know.

    I've attached a few before and after pictures so you can see for yourself. I also apologize for the state of the rest of my engine compartment. I am in the early stages of doing a complete refresh and still have a lot of work ahead, but I at least have the fuel system done.

    If anyone needs any further info on this, please feel free to contact me. Hopes this helps out a few other forum members.

    Mike.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]48068[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]48067[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]48065[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]48066[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]48069[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]48070[/ATTACH]

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    I recieved an email yesterday from Datsun Classifieds that said Happy New Year, and said to watch for news of a new 240z coming in 2014. Is there any truth to this, or is this just a bs rumor about a successor to the 240sx to get more action to the site? I'm a member of Nico also , and we've been talking about the need for a new affordable rwd sport coupe, and Andy Palmer has been ringing in and told us that something is in the works, but the administrator told me that their lineup up to 2016 is already filled. As a potential buyer of one, and speaking for all potential buyers, I think we deserve to know the truth, and people need to stop posting rumors.

  12. Blog 59blane

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    Well, my entry into the Z world kind of came by lucky accident I guess you could say. Back in 2002 I started yearning to have a 'fun' car again. Something that I could play around with and not have to rely on as my daily driver.

    A bit of history on the cars I've owned. In the past I have a few 'fun' cars. I've been the owner of such cars, to name just a few, as a pristine 1965 Pontiac Grand Prix with 23,000 miles in 1986, a 1976 Camaro LT (a 4-speed car sold in California), a 1976 Firebird Formula 350, a couple of Chevy Vegas (one of which had a Hooker V8 conversion. I rolled that one... bias ply tires up front and radials in the back on a front-heavy car ain't so good), and a trio of 1969 Firebirds. God as my witness one of my '69 Firebirds was TA. In 1977, still in High School, I traded my 1969 OHC L6 Firebird for the TA at Steve's Car Lot in Reno. I can still remember drooling over the artists drawings of the TA in the Firebird brochure in 1976 when my Mom bought her Firebird Formula. In fact, I bought the OHC L6 Firebird from the salesman that sold her her Firebird. Anyway, after a Clifford Research header install and a factory Quadra-Jet swap on the OHC Firebird, I saw the TA... Pearl white paint with blue stripes... 50s in the back, Gabriel High-Jackers, and a Chevy 350 under the hood.... and had to have it. So like a dork, I traded my OHC Firebird and started the life-long tradition of car payments.

    OK, so those cars are long gone. I could still kick myself in the a$$ for getting rid of the Grand Prix, the TA and '69 Firebird 400 I had to restore the TA with. Oh well, life goes on. So back to 2002. I'm driving a VW Jetta, my wife has a Isuzu Rodeo.... and we have a perfectly good, pristine 1989 Toyota Turbo Supra in the garage to play with. And of course I get the itch to play around with another woman... of the 4-wheel variety. I start eyeing the Supra with dreams of coil-overs, bigger turbo, Lexus AFMs and bigger injectors dancing in my head. Suddenly my better judgment steps in, in the form of my wife, telling me I better not touch the Supra. OK, what to do? Look for another car! So....... I start searching for the obvious candidates... Firebirds and Camaros. OH MY GAWD!!! Look at those prices!!! Mind you, this was before BJ auctions were so popular, and had a hand in putting 'American muscle-cars' out of the reach of most of us. A rusted-out POS was going for at least 3 grand. So I remember the fun I had in the V8 Vega... so, I try and find a Vega that isn't half rust, already been converted to a V8 or a Cosworth. Hmmmmmm... dreams on hold.

    One day in 2004 I was talking with a co-worker about cars and he mentioned this cool video of a guy named Darius and his V8 Z. So, he shows me this online video of this awesome car!! I was in a daze. I remembered the Scarabs back in the '70s. Right then I decided to search for a Z. Well, I pretty much forgot about looking with work and family being my priorities.

    In early February, 2005, I'm sitting in the Sacramento airport, waiting for a flight to Denver. I pick up the Classified section of the Bee that someone has left on the seat next to me. Looking through the cars I spot a 1974 260Z for sale. Good condition. Engine seized. $500.



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