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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/28/2022 in Posts

  1. There are many forces at play right now and more complicated that the average Joe really understands. 1. The Pandemic - this was the catalyst not the cause of shortages, shortages lead to supply/ demand going out of balance and thus higher prices ensued . Federal free money (Covid stimulus checks) while necessary to keep some people afloat they forced out of work through the demand curve way outside the normal. It also upset the labor market. Some people decided not to work even when they could. 2. The Federal Reserve printing money since QE1 (circa - Nov 2008) which accelerated through QE4 expanding the Fed balance sheet has created a glut of cash in the economy and very low interest rates, this further disrupts the supply/demand balance. Cheap money encourages poor spending decisions. When a 5 yr loan is 1% people borrow more money and buy more crap. 3. Energy costs have soared. It began well before Putin attacked Ukraine. A couple things happened here. One when the economy began to turn back on demand for fuel outpaced production. Oil and gas companies were caught in a bullwhip effect. In June of 2020 there was a glut of crude oil that left them scrambling to find space to store oversupply. Crude tumbled to $9.12 a barrel in April 21. When the world economy started to turn back on suppliers had basically turned off the spigot. 4. New leadership - our new President enacted policies that make it challenging to explore oil and drill for oil and gas. He stopped renewing off shore drilling leases and exploring or drilling on Federal lands. Billions invested by oil companies in pipelines were scrapped and sit partially complete or dormant meaning fuel has to be trucked and brought in on rail. He had publicly stated in his campaign he would End All Fossil Fuels. The oil companies have decided it’s too risky to invest in further production so they aren’t producing as much and in an unfriendly environment can take consumers to the cleaners with low supply. 5. Putin steps in and kicked over the apple cart. With sanctions on Russian, oil and gas supply’s are further inhibited. Russia is rich in natural resources, fertilizer, minerals, lumber, grain. Ukraine was also. Now we have soaring prices on things like Nickel, copper etc. 6. Labor shortages - Again the pandemic caused a major disruption in America’s labor force, some have referred it as the “Great Resignation” in 2021 47 million Americans quit their jobs. Labor is way more expensive now and this directly impacts a companies bottom line. When China stops the lock downs and comes back online, we are really going to see energy prices soar. Hold on for a wild ride. Cliff, great story about the landlord. This is how it’s supposed to work. You raise prices too much people go somewhere else. This is how the free market is supposed to work BUT in our modern complex society we have serious barriers to entry now. Oil companies or chip manufacturers don’t have to worry so much about competition driving prices down because you just can’t build a chip factory overnight or a oil mining company, These companies have the market by the balls now. This is not how the market is supposed to work. What’s supposed to happen is competition is supposed to drive prices down but that can’t happen now in many markets. Trying not to to be political just trying to lay it all out there, because there is a complete lack of understanding out there..
    10 points
  2. This restoration shop is a full service business. Classic Car Restorations in Bradenton, Florida. Complete services from paint and body work to interior work to full reassembly. Many thanks to Brian and his crew for excellent work and specific attention to detail. They fixed some poor welding work and fixed some other metal that had been covered over in Bondo. Once I get the car rolling and running, she will go back for the interior installation - butterscotch. For 26th, I chose a two stage acrylic with a clear coat. The underside is textured in a colorised product called Raptor. I decided to texture the wheel wells and inner fenders. The interior finish is just the base coat which is why it looks a little dull
    10 points
  3. It has been one long journey. Three different body shops, years of storage, but she will be coming home next week to begin the reassembly process. Finally!
    10 points
  4. Stacked some high build right before supper. Hopefully it will block out pretty close without needing too much more work
    8 points
  5. I'm possibly not the best person to answer the question regarding what was available for the LHD models, but - as far as I am aware - the full range of Nissan Sports/Race Option parts, as seen in the Japanese market, were not readily available for buyers in Export markets until Nissan started issuing their catalogues in English. Certain individuals, race and rally preparation shops and dealers got access to the Japanese catalogues through their own contacts and purchased parts privately (reportedly this could often be a struggle...) but it was not until the mid 1970s that this became a little easier. 'Datsun Competition' in the USA seemed to sell a mixture of Japanese made parts and locally-sourced products, and - for example - their 99996-E1140 'Competition Header' for the L6 was certainly a locally-made version with a single merged outlet rather than the typical Japanese 'binocular' twin-pipe outlet. The Works rally cars usually had hand-made exhaust manifolds with the expected creeping evolutionary differences. They were always made in Japan and the cars arrived fully built and ready for the events, even if a little local modification (to suit driver and navigator preference) was performed locally by a combination of Works and satellite team personnel. Because of their position on the cars the manifolds are quite camera shy, but here are some I have captured:
    7 points
  6. So let’s see about a little update: Cody and I started working on his motor maybe a week ago or so We had to decide if we were going to drill the mains out or just slot the block side of the main cap and add a feed hole in the bearing. I looked in Honsowetz’s book and he recommends opening those feed galleys up to 5/16 or 0.313”. Which if I calculated it right is a 62% increase. So Cody and I discussed it and felt more comfortable with drilling the mains. Partly because we’re not making a lot of grit in the engine block. We started by getting the end plugs out of the main galleys. That way we could properly clean and wash the block later. They were stouter then I expected… A little homemade puller big enough for the plug to pass through it We didn’t want to drill the supply mains and realize we couldn't get the main galley open to clean it out. Then we worked on tapping the ends of the main galley for brass plugs We may have to make these deeper but I didn’t want to make them too large since the 3/8 NPT tap is tapered. On to drilling… So this is really sketchy because the metal drills pretty easily but only the very edges of the bit are cutting. We used 3 different sized bits to work up to 5/16”. They didn’t need to be special because you’re not drilling overly deep. We were concerned we might break a bit but with a little cutting oil it went pretty good. We were going to clean the block up and get ready for setting the rotating assembly but I can’t find the main bearings I bought! I went by the machine shop last Tuesday and he didn’t have them. Even though I’m pretty sure I took them, but I can’t be sure I didn’t pick them up. The problem is, right now they seem to be unavailable everywhere. Neither Clevite or King. I found some vintage TRW’s on ebay I have coming my way and I have an order in for some Kings from another place. Hopefully one of them will get here soon. Cody would like to have a running car by Zcon. He will have to hustle! It’s doable but he will have to focus to get it done.
    7 points
  7. Here's my last photo of Dee from this morning. She loved looking out to see what was going on. She was a wonderful sentinel for the Amazon deliveries. It's been a tough day for the most part. Around noon I went to sit out on the front porch. Just before I went inside, I heard the raspy note of an old 4 cylinder as my neighbor took his MG out for a drive. I asked him how his drive went. He said there were no problems, and even the electric overdrive worked to his surprise. I told him that it was fed from the same relay we replaced. Anyway, he's the original owner of his 1980 MGB, and he takes pretty good care of the car. It shows you that a loving owner can overcome a lot of quality issues on a car.
    7 points
  8. This epoxy is a sandable primer so I wasn't too worried about the fisheyes. I mostly filled them in on subsequent passes but no I didn't shoot a test panel. The car will be bright yellow when done
    6 points
  9. So I finally got the car sanded down as far as I was willing to go. I taped it all up over the last week or so and reset the booth. Then shot some SPI white epoxy over that. It's a little different than what I am familiar with. It will fish eye if you lay the first coat on too heavy. Being white it can be hard to get full hiding coverage. I may stack some high build tomorrow. I've got 7 days to coat. We'll see...
    6 points
  10. Gotta make a coupla observations based on my experience. I was a Datsun dealer mechanic, no, not a technician or "tech" - a mechanic, from the early summer of 1970 until about 1980. ALL of the new Datsuns sold at the dealers where I was employed until about 1976 or so did not have undercoating from the factory and were, therefore, body color underneath. The paint applied at the factory to the bottom of the 240s, 510s, 1200, 610s, 710s, roadsters and trucks was very inconsistent from one area to another. It might be pretty OK here but thin over there. Lots of orange peel here and a bit of dirt in the paint over there. Whoa, yes, I know the trucks and roadsters had separate frames, painted a rather thin black, but the bottom sheet metal was body color. Sorry to say I undercoated lots and lots of the same cars. I seem to remember getting paid .3/hour labor for every one I did usually as the finale of the PDI (per delivery inspection) which paid additionally depending on the model. Flash forward a number of years to my shop where I've/we've done a number of 240 restorations to ZCCA Gold Medallion standards. I hope to notch my fourth at the convention this summer. In each case I've asked the owner if he wants his restoration to reflect the way it rolled off the truck at the dealership or the contemporary standard. Before he answers me I show him the many detailed pictures I keep on file of original unmodified Zs. Remember, these pictures show details like glue running down from grommets and orange peel in enamel paint. I think you can guess the answer I always get. Carl, you're very close on your estimate of the current cost of such an undertaking. Yes, there are cheaper prices being quoted all over the place but those units will NEVER be in the running for the top prizes or pass inspection from snobs like me who have seen just about every shade of half assed restorations. The big problem I see going forward is parts. The highest level restorations require fast disappearing goodies. Just the elementary stuff like correct spark plug wire sets, exhaust system components, battery cables, wiper blades, etc. can only be had by beating the bushes really really hard and paying a ton of money. Here's one I hear all the time - well, someone should reproduce that, if they do they'll get rich! NO, NO it doesn't happen that way. I know from my very extensive experience that reproduction, after you spend a LOT of time finding a manufacturer willing to make that widget for you, is VERY expensive. One example, for several years I've been shopping around looking for a domestic manufacturer willing and able to manufacture correct battery cables. Finally found one but the fixed costs would be about 40K for 240 positive and negative cables. Another example, 77/78 280 front and rear bumper ends, 10k for the mold and you would need 4. Chris @ S30 World, my hat is off to you and I sincerely hope you live to a healthy very old age! I know you have a TON of $ invested in your very nice tanks. PS, best of luck with your hand brake cables. Yes, his cars are for his personal collection. It's late and I'm getting sleepy.
    6 points
  11. Thank you @xs10shl for starting this thread. It is something of a relief after the mild social media hubbub following its appearance at the ZONC 50th Anniversary meet. Seems a few people got a not-unpleasant surprise. Not many people knew the car still existed. My inbox got very busy! "Is it The Real Thing?" was a frequent question... Yes, it is very much The Real Thing. This is an important car. Important to us as S30-series Z enthusiasts, important to Nissan/Datsun history and important within the history of the rallying world and the International Championship Of Makes (predecessor to the World Rally Championship For Manufacturers, which began in 1973). Nissan built a surprising number of these cars, but very few survive. Off the top of my head I can only think of SIX genuine Works 240Z rally cars that are still known to exist as complete entities, along with TWO ex-Works rally bodyshells converted to circuit race cars. Three of the former are owned by Nissan themselves and two are here in the UK. And this car is the earliest known surviving Works 240Z rally car. It also has the bonus of being an example of the 'Lightweight' body type (incorporating many of the thinner-gauge sheetmetal pressings used on the 'PZR' Fairlady Z432-R) and the Works team built it with fibreglass hood, tailgate and doors to offset the weight of the extra equipment a top line rally car needed. Drilling down into the details you could fill a book. Make no mistake, these cars were very special indeed and almost every part is custom or modified in some way over stock. They were hand built by a relatively small team of specialists at Nissan's Oppama-based competition department in small batches, each batch dedicated to one main event: RAC Rally, Monte Carlo Rallye and East African Safari Rally being the main three and the Safari being Target Number One. So each batch was different and the specifications of the cars and parts used evolved in steps as upgrades whilst also needing to comply with new regulations. Because of this evolution it is dangerous to generalise and say "the Works rally cars had...". Probably better to point at a batch, or talk about the cars on a case-by-case basis. For me, that makes them all the more fascinating.
    6 points
  12. After a long 4 months, the ZONC 50th Anniversary was upon us! The morning of June 5 brought unseasonably rainy weather, but there was still a great turnout of cars and Z car fans at the Blackhawk Museum. The drizzle was somehow fitting for the look of the rally Z, and provided a light touch of patina, especially when considering its past history of being driven in anger through snow and mud. Below are a few pictures from June 5. It was a wonderful experience to meet so many fellow Z enthusiasts, see so many great Datsuns, and discuss and share our love for our Z cars. We were only too happy with the great reception we received, and were pleased to be able to finally show-and-tell the car’s unique features with fellow rally fans. Thanks to Linda and the ZONC community for putting on a great show. Much more content to follow in the coming days, months, and (gulp) years!
    6 points
  13. Checked my timing today with a new timing light that shows RPM. 10 deg at 800 RPM, 35 deg at 2500 RPM. Seems like my mechanical and vacuum advance are working are designed.
    6 points
  14. Hi, not a S30 topic . Today I was in a Nara convention center for new Z show time . It’s just about 15 minutes drive from my home . I really like this new Z , this is the first time that I would want a newer Z . I got into a cockpit, very nice ! And I didn’t forget to take a shot of a chassis number tag on the kicking plate . It is a RZ34-100014 , very early!! This will mean 14th of RHD RZ34 , I think 😍 A Nissan employee said this car is for testing, displaying, so never will make it on the road , sadly. Tamura san kindly visited my home and my garage , he said he really likes blue , so this time new Z blue is his strong recommendation. Also Tamura san started to talk about he dedicated his passion and time and money everything to L-series engine modification in younger days , he used to be wild on the street. Kats
    6 points
  15. Gets bigger every year. Around 200 registered. Big thanks to Scott, Taylor, & Mike for the super great brisket and pork. Some fun drives with the GeeZer gang to the suspension bridge & table rock dam. The BZF photo shoot with the new Z was fun too... The organization of this event is absolutely top notch, thanks Josh!! The dam run The bridge run One red Z with 647,00 miles and a new one with 300 miles Somehow, the curves look better on this Z33 A full on twin turbo swap, (you won't see that at a SteveJ cars & coffee...) Part of the GeeZer brisket line My favorite part of the event Running up the tab with Cliff approved appetizers ...
    6 points
  16. I took my 280 to the local grocery store where I found a Porterhouse for $10.99lb and that's cheap around here. 240 gets it's turn Sunday morning to de glaze the brake pads.
    6 points
  17. Hi , now Japan is in a rainy season . But today we had sunshine , so I decided to clean up an engine at a car wash . My friends kindly helped me out for this mission, I am very happy it’s results. Not perfect because I didn’t take off a front cover , and a fly wheel . There are two plugs each side ( front and rear ) , I wanted to, but I had limited time to operate today . General cleaning was the first thing to do . This engine is on HLS30-02146 , L24- 005318 was probably sitting in a garage for last 30 years , I see very bad contaminations there . Rusty , gelled water in the block . We did our best , it was so fun ! Kats
    5 points
  18. Went to a very large car show on Vancouver island for Father’s Day (625 + cars) there was a very nice orange early car there Vin 957, young gentleman that inherited it from his dad.
    5 points
  19. These were recently posted on FB. Seems relevant to the thread.
    5 points
  20. The front part of the head gasket seals the head to the front cover. When you pull the front cover while leaving the head attached, you need to pay special attention to the head gasket seal in that area when you reinstall the front cover - and it will require sealant which is tricky because the gasket will likely be oily. Some people cut the gasket back at the block face, clean it, the bottom of the head, top of the front cover, and put it back in place with sealant on both surfaces and "back in the corner" at the cut line. I do. It's good insurance. I imagine everyone has their preferred method. A Volkswagen engine builder taught me to apply a gasket sealer (I use Permatex gasket maker in the tube) this way: rubber gloves, put a small amount of sealer on your gloved finger, press it to your thumb, pinch the gasket between your thumb and finger lightly and keep pinching until you need more sealant then repeat. The object is to put a very thin layer of the sealant on both sides of the gasket and you can even it out by going back over the heavier parts when your finger has run out. This way you have a little added protection and you don't have RTV oozing out the sides (both inside the engine and out...) Ya, it's kind of a PITA, but it's worth it.
    5 points
  21. Brandon finished the 1987 Pathfinder. All original paint wet sanded and buffed. All new rubber and bumpers and grill painted. It came out better than new!
    5 points
  22. The rest of my parts have been plated - yay! The parts which are yellow are likely to be much more shiny than the finish from the factory. I think they came out quite nice though. Not sure why, but a couple of the hard lines got bent pretty significantly. I think I'll be able to straighten them out, but will likely have to wait until they are ready to go back on the car so I can see how they need to be bent to fix them.
    5 points
  23. Trying to get a little done anytime I can but probably get a max of 8hrs of work in a week if I’m lucky. First piece is almost finished but ran out of gas and my hook up for welding supplies is one worker short. Unfortunately he was the one that helped us the most. Just getting close to finishing up making the patch pieces for the floor joint in front of the first section. Need to fill in my holes yet Vise grip orgy Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    5 points
  24. I believe this may be that which you seek. PM me to discuss discussion of asset transferancing. Yes I’ve been drinking again.
    5 points
  25. Brandon had his Pathfinder wet sanded and buffed. Original paint came out better than new…..beautiful!
    5 points
  26. Watching my grandson learn the lines at the local gocart track!!!! Kid’s gonna be another John Morton!!!! IMG_3534.MOV
    5 points
  27. I got new tires for the 260Z in preparation for ZCON. After that, I drove over to meet a couple of friends at Caffeine and Chrome. It's nice when you can get a 240Z, 260Z, and 280Z together at a meet.
    5 points
  28. Jackpot! I knew there was a zcar antenna around somewhere. I went out to the shop and gave a look around. I thought I had previously gone through all the boxes. For some reason, I missed it. In the bottom of a box was this electric antenna wrapped in a bag. I am pretty certain it came out of my Dads 77 280 right after he bought it. He was into CB radios and bought an antenna that would work with a radio and a CB. The original antenna went into storage. About 30 years ago my mom said I am throwing out all this old car stuff, so come get what you want. I did. The 280 antenna looks to be very similar to the 240. The tip unscrews and the mounting hardware is mint. I fell like I won the lottery. The switch to the right looks to be an early 240. The switch that was attached to the antenna looks to be factory, but I just dont know the 280's very well.
    4 points
  29. I’m starting this restoration thread for enthusiasts of the early S30 Works rally cars, so they can follow along, and perhaps also provide comments and their own insights as to the very early days of the S30 Works rally program. I additionally hope that others can chime in with comments, questions, corrections, and feedback as we go along. A preamble: this is a thread about researching, documenting and restoring a genuine 1970 Works Rally car. I’ve owned it for many years, but the realities of real life were getting in the way of getting started on a proper restoration. Given the car's provenance, I knew it would be important to get the history and the details as right as I could, given what little is known publicly about the Works program, and the scarcity of remaining Works cars. So I’ve used this time to do as much research as I could on the car's history, collaborate with a few historians (most notably @HS30-H, who needs no introduction), source a few needed parts, and work to provide a more complete pre-restoration snapshot in it’s current unrestored condition, as well as provide a glimpse of what the restored car will resemble when it’s finished. In addition to documenting and research, I've been looking for an appropriate opportunity to show the car publicly under my stewardship for the first time. Given the car’s current condition, it would have to be trailered to a show, which limited my options to “Somewhere on the West Coast". The stars aligned when ZONC announced it’s 50th anniversary meet in Northern CA in February for June 5, 2022. With this as a target date, I set my sights on getting the car as presentable as I could manage, given the time I had available to me. Loose parts were screwed on, dirty pieces were dusted off, and period stickers were researched, ordered, and placed (note: this last step was insanely fun). In my experience, there’s nothing like having a show deadline to motivate owners into getting their cars finished! Enthusiasts, historians, well-wishers, even skeptics and haters (although hopefully not too many of the latter): I look forward sharing this journey with you, and to your comments! 😄
    4 points
  30. Not wishing to divert attention from 'TKS 33 SA 986', but to give a little extra context on the Works cars and a similar case of a Lazarus-like revival, please let me add a post to tell the tale of 'TKS 33 SA 3640'. I hope it will encourage @xs10shlin his task and help drive him along his road to restoration. 'TKS 33 SA 3640' was one of a batch of four RHD lightweight HS30 Datsun 240Z rally cars built up by the Works team at Oppama during the third quarter of 1971, for the express purpose of taking part in the 1971 RAC Rally here in the UK in late November. It was driven on the event by German-born Kenyan national Edgar Herrmann and his German co-driver/navigator Hans Schuller who had won the East African Safari Rally in their lightweight HS30 Datsun 240Z 'TKS 33 SA 1223' in April. That Safari win gave them a high seeding and a start number of '5', which would be something of an advantage on a forest type rally. But Herrmann - famously - had never rallied on snow before, and it was something of a certainty on the RAC. In fact, unusually heavy snow caused so much disruption on the event that a high number of special stages were cancelled/annulled halfway through and service crews struggled to make rendezvous with their team cars. There was a high rate of attrition. Herrmann/Schuller finished, but were classified 17th overall and 5th in the Group 4 class. Team members Rauno Aaltonen and Tony Fall were both non-finishers, but Shekhar Mehta - driving one of the previous year's RAC cars - finished 19th overall and 6th in Group 4. Privateer Rob Janssen - driving ex-'TKS 33 SA 986', now registered on Dutch plates '67-54-RU' and the subject of this thread - also retired. After the RAC 'TKS 33 SA 3640' stayed in the UK and was used for promotional duties by Datsun UK. Eventually it was sold to a Datsun dealership and was used on various UK rally events during the following years. It changed hands a couple of times, but eventually ended up in storage on a farm in the far north east of England. It stayed there - narrowly escaping a fire at one point - until bought by my dear friend Kevin Bristow in 1996. Decrepit, somewhat rusty (to say the least...) but largely complete, intact and authentic. Kevin started a long and slow process of research, parts (re)acquisition and restoration. I had the pleasure of being a small part in all of that. To cut a long story short, Kevin finished the car in 2008. Twelve years! The result is stunning. It was featured in the August 2009 edition of OCTANE Magazine with studio shots and a great write-up by Paul Hardiman (see attached). Kevin also took it to the 2009 Chatsworth Rally Show in Derbyshire, and demonstrated the car on the short Special Stage in the grounds of Chatsworth House. I got the honour of pretending to be the navigator (or Self Loading Freight perhaps...) whilst Kevin didn't hold back. The car got wet and muddy, as it was built to do. Fully alive again. '3640' on the 1971 RAC Rally: Classic & Sport Car Magazine 'as found' report: Post-restoration OCTANE Magazine feature: "Forensics". Pretty much, yes: And in action at the 2009 Chatsworth Rally Show: I hope the above is an inspiration and encouragement to @xs10shlin his journey to restore and refurbish 'TKS 33 SA 986'.
    4 points
  31. The places you mentioned that offers free shipping on large orders enjoy the benefits of economy of scale. Companies like Summit and Jegs offers a vast product line that covers a variety of models and makes. As a result, they can negotiate shipping arrangements with logistic companies without adversely impacting their bottom line.
    4 points
  32. I was able to buy it new from Nissan a few months ago, complete with the chrome caps.
    4 points
  33. The rubber bushings in your suspension and steering provide compliance - the ability to absorb shocks transmitted from the road. Going to polyurethane or similar materials eliminates the compliance benefit and allows road shocks to be carried directly into the body and steering wheel. That also allows a lot more noise into the cabin. Poly is great for a track car, not so much for a driver street car. And... yes your car has a steering rack. As for replacement shocks, KYB makes a great shock with stock-like qualities. Look up your suspension bushing part numbers on the online catalog and see if any are still available from your Nissan dealer. Then got to Rockauto and try to fill in the gaps. It is difficult to impossible to get OE rubber bushings for most steering racks - pretty much unicorns, so it is a good chance poly will be your only option there. If you come across any Beck-Arnley rubber bushings, grab them as they are an excellent product.
    4 points
  34. They rarely go bad just filing the contacts to shine again and making sure there's no spider webs in there. I had to bend the arm on mine when I first bought my '77 after reading this great write up with a lot of good photos. Thanks @240260280 https://www.atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/tps/index.html
    4 points
  35. Not all shops or technicians created equal ! the shop that I bought the tires mounted, balanced and aligned the wheels/tires, were decent. At lease I was happy for a year until I took the new mag wheels to swapped out the tires and balanced on the new wheels. needless to say, same shop, different technician have different results. Reason I went for this same shop because Costco do not carry the tires size of the stock rims, 14”. I took the car to Costco for balance. The technician was cautious as he didn’t want to mess up the “classic” car as there’s no place to jack up the car. I had to convince him the location where he can put the lifters in. However, he still hesitated and the manager need to approve. Manager didn’t want it either and insist to lift the car at the frame rails… fortunately, I did reenforce the frame rails so I ageed. Low and behold, 90 minutes pass and it’s done. Drove the car home, though short distance and NO VIBRATION at all. I will have to do more driving tomorrow to confirm the result, but so far I'm happy with the result. stay tune folks
    4 points
  36. Picked up my vapor honing blast box today. Had some time to try out a few parts. Not too bad. I think I am going to like it. I have made a good bit of progress over the last few weeks. I will post up some pictures tomorrow.
    4 points
  37. I went through the wiring diagram I have, which I downloaded from this site, and captured the wire colors running to each component in the stock system. I am planning to use this list to figure out what color wire to change to when I am unable to source wiring in the stock colors, but I thought I would post it here for anyone who wants it. Item OEM Wire Color Water tank • Black • Black w/ Yellow Side Marker Lamp RH • Black • Green w/ Blue Inspection Light • Ground • Red w/ Blue Horn Relay • Green • Green w/ Black • Green w/ Red Battery • Black • Black • Ground Accessory Relay • Blue • Black • White w/ Red • Blue Choke Switch • Black • Red w/ Blue Map Light • Black • Red w/ Blue Rheostat • Green w/ White • Red w/ Blue Fuel Pump • Yellow • Black Defrost Relay • Blue w/ Red • Black • White w/ Red • Red w/ Black Glove Box Light • Ground • Red w/ Blue Room Light • Black • Red w/ Blue Tank Unit • Yellow • Black Step Light RH • Black • Red w/ Blue Side Marker RH • Black • Green w/ White Ground • Black Rear Combination Light RH • White w/ Black • Green w/ White • Black • Red w/ Black Rear Combination Light RH Rear Combination Light RH License Light RH • Black • Black License Light LH • Black • Black Heat - Glass • Red w/ Black • Black Rear Combination Light LH • White w/ Black • Green w/ White • Black • Red w/ Black Rear Combination Light LH Rear Combination Light LH Auto Antenna • Blue w/ Red • Blue w/ White • Black • Antenna Lead Antenna switch • Blue w/ Red • Blue w/ White • Blue Side Marker LH • Black • Green w/ White Step Light LH • Black • Red w/ Blue Comb. Switch • Green w/ Blue (1) • Green w/ White (2) • White w/ Red (19) • Black (3) • Blue w/ Yellow (4) • Blue w/ White (5) • Red (20) • Blue (6) • Red w/ Blue (7) • Blue w/ Red (8) --- • Green w/ Yellow (9) • White w/ Red (10) • White w/ Black (11) • Green w/ Red (12) • Green w/ Black (13) • White (14) • Red w/ White (15) • Red w/ Black (16) • _____ (17) • Green w/ Black (18) Hand Break Switch • Ground • Yellow w/ Blue Speedometer • Red w/ Blue • Red w/ Blue • Red • Red w/ White • Yellow w/ Blue • Red w/ Blue Tachometer • Green • Red w/ Blue • Green w/ Black • Green w/ White • Black w/ White • Green w/ Red • Red w/ Blue • Black Oil Pressure / Water Temp • Black • Yellow w/ White • Green to Yellow w/ Red • Red w/ Blue • Green to Yellow w/ Red • Yellow w/ White Fuel Gauge / Ammeter • White w/ Red • White • Red w/ Blue • Yellow • Green to Yellow w/ Red • Black Clock • Black • Red w/ Blue • Blue Choke Warning Light • Red w/ Blue • Red Defrost Switch • [MISSING] • Blue w/ Red • Blue Seatbelt Warning Light • Black • Green Fog Light Switch • Red • Red w/ Green Door Switch RH • Black • Black • Ground Cigarette Lighter • Blue w/ White • Black Seat Switch • Red • Green w/ Black Seatbelt Switch LH • Green w/ Black • Green Seatbelt Switch RH • Green • Green w/ Black Neutral Switch • Green • Green Buzzer • Green • Black Door Switch LH • Black • Black • Black • Black • Ground Indicator Lamp (Auto T/M) • Black • Red w/ Blue Hazard Switch • Green w/ White (1) • Green w/ Red (2) • Green w/ Black (3) • Green (4) • Green (5) • Green w/ Yellow (6) • Green w/ Yellow (7) • White w/ Black (8) • White w/ Red (9) Ignition Switch • Black w/ Yellow (1) • Black w/ White (2) • White w/ Red (3) • Blue w/ Red (4) • Green w/ Blue (5) Steering Lock Switch • Red • Black Wiper Motor • Black (E) • Blue w/ Red (B) • Blue (L) • Blue w/ White (M) • Blue w/ Yellow (H) Buzzer • Yellow • Red Inhibitor Switch (Auto T/M) • Black w/ Yellow • Black w/ Yellow • Red w/ Black • Red Air Con Power • Red to Blue Blower Switch • Red • Black • Black Heater / Blower • Red • Black • Black • Ground Side Marker Lamp LH • Black • Green w/ Blue Parking & T/S & Side Front LH • Black • Green w/ Red • Green w/ Blue Head Light LH • Red w/ Black • Red w/ White • Red w/ Yellow Horn L • Green • Ground Fog Light LH • Black • Red Fog Light RH • Black • Red Horn R • Green • Ground Head Light RH • Red w/ Black • Red w/ White • Red w/ Yellow Parking & T/S & Side Front RH • Black • Green w/ Blue • Green w/ Black Voltage Regulator • Black (E) • White (A) • White w/ Black (F) • Yellow (N) • _____ (L) • _____ (–) • Black w/ White (IG) Thermal T/M • Yellow w/ White • Ground Oil Pressure • Yellow w/ White • Ground Fuse Box • Green w/ Red (H) • Green w/ Yellow (S) • Red w/ Blue (PT) • Red w/ Blue (PL) • Red (HR) • Red w/ Yellow (HL) • Blue w/ White (C) • Blue (A) • Blue w/ Red (W) • _____ (F) • Black w/ White (IG) • Blue w/ Red (C) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • Red (–) • White w/ Red (A) • White w/ Red (A) • _____ (–) • White (B) Starter Motor • Black • Black • Black w/ Yellow • Ground Fusable Link • Black Radio • Ground • Black • Red w/ Blue • Antenna Lead Reverse Switch • Red w/ Black • Red Turn Signal Flash Switch • Green • White Four Way Flasher • Blue w/ White • Green w/ White Brake Indicator • Yellow w/ Blue • Ground Stop Switch • Green w/ Yellow • Green w/ Yellow Ballast Resistor • Green w/ White • Black w/ White Thermo sw (Auto T/m) • Black w/ White • Green Alternator • Black (E) • _____ (A) • White w/ Black (F) • Yellow (N) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • _____ (–) • Fusible Link (A) • Black (E) Fusable Link • White w/ Red Thermo Relay (Auto T/M0 • Green • Black • Black • Red w/ Black to Black Coil • Black • (To Distributor) Distributor (Manual T/M) • Black • (From Coil)
    4 points
  38. I was working on the comboi light switch from VIN #1818, 02/70, and noted a couple of weak design issues that were later eliminated. The first is the method of indexing the main plastic barrel to the frame with a small tab on the barrel that fits into a small recess on the frame. The plastic tab was long gone on this car and the PO had substituted a tiny piece of wire and a cut off straight pin, both jammed into the plastic to provide the index. I located suitable donor material in the form of a long dead BIC lighter, cut a piece from the body and notched the barrel to receive the transplant. The transplant was glued into place and then trimmed to fit the frame recess. All later model switches I have worked on reversed this design to provide a raised boss on the frame to fit into a notch on the plastic barrel. The second design item I found is the use of a jumper wire to route power from the light switch over to the wiper switch, later replaced with a dedicated power wire in the wiring harness.
    4 points
  39. I suspect my 280 is the only Z car with Campagnolos and yes they were purchased new.
    4 points
  40. 10 years later and I'm still sending 280Z owners to this Link....👍
    4 points
  41. OK, got it. So getting into the details about the voltage number measurements you got... I'm pretty sure you already know this, but they don't really make sense. If you pull the all the injector connectors off, turn the key to ON, and measure across the two injector connections inside any of the connectors, I would expect to see a low voltage on all of them. But it's a little unpredictable because of the way the circuit works. One side of each connector should be connected to the battery (through the dropping resistor) and the other side of each connector should be floating pretty much as a no-connect. However, there is a capacitive load on each of those floating sides that could provide some weird numbers if you don't know what you're looking at. You could charge or discharge that capacitor through your meter and the numbers could change as you're watching them. So with all that in mind (and as mentioned above), it would probably be easiest to change the way you are taking your measurements and see what you get when you just measure from the injector contacts to a known good ground instead of measuring between the two contacts in the same shell. I mean, there's info to be gleaned from what you already did, but without being there and seeing what type of meter you're using and watching the numbers for stability, it would be simpler just to re-do the measurements and reference everything to ground.
    4 points
  42. Hear are some pictures of the exhaust manifold I found for 26th. This was just after I had it ceramic coated and I was testing the fit. It came with a metal shroud for the air filter pre-heater tube bolted to the manifold. That's what those tapped holes are for. It has full casting nipples. Yours were ground off, Kats! My thought about this manifold is that the flow and pressure is about the same as a set of custom headers. I read some report that dyno tested the cast manifold against the headers for the gain in horsepower.
    4 points

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