Jump to content

IGNORED

Considering a 1980zx


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, JHzcar said:


more when the oil pressure has a very slight surge at idle is when it’s time to top off, it only had a 5qt pan so it didn’t have to lose much to start surging


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

It would have to be more than a quart low to have trouble picking up oil at idle (assuming the car is not moving).

My first car was a 62 Impala with a 283. It leaked at the front and rear seals, the oil pan, and the rocker covers. It still ran great when I used that car up and sold it to the junk man, probably the only useful thing left.

I was pretty hard on that car.

My second car was a 64 Chevelle, 2 door post. I yanked the 6 banger out and dropped in a 327, and a 2 speed Powerglide out of a 65 Chevelle hardtop a buddy had that he totalled. It leaked oil, but not as bad as the 283 in the Impala.

I sold that car and bought a 65 Comet Caliente, 289, 3 speed full syncro floor shift. It didn't leak oil, or burn any.  Fun car. Fast car.

My next car was a 66 Impala SS396, Turbo 400, posi rear end. The rear main leaked a little bit, but not enough to make me want to pull the tranny to fix it. Besides, I nearly went broke keeping tires in the rear wheels. 

After too many tickets I traded it straight across for a 66 VW Beetle. It didn't leak oil. It was a fun car to load up with beer and 3 buddies, then go up into the  mountains where only 4x4's dare run. If we did run into a stretch that was impassable, we all got out, picked up the front of the car and swung it around. Otherwise we always had a good time watching the reactions from the 4x4s when we reached the top of a particulary difficult stretch of road.

After that I bought a 72 Camaro. I did't leak oil. An old timer I apprenticed under showed me how to seal up Chevy engines.

A while later I discovered Datsuns, started racing one, and bought a 73 GMC dually with a 396 to pull the race trailer. Using the secrets imparted by the sage mentioned earlier, I sealed it up. It was a good truck, and later replaced by a 75 Chevy 3500 dually with a 454. Again, leaking was addressed and that rig served me well.

In 2001 I replaced it with a brand new Ram 3500, Cummins 5.9 24 valve and NVG 6 speed manual. I just gave it a 140,000 mile oil and filter change, rotated the tires and adjusted air pressures, and gave it a full inspection. I doesn't leak anything but torque.


By the way, I like the color you shot the car with. What is it from? Looks a bit like the bright colors used on the Dodge and Plymouth muscle cars of the early 70's.

Is a manual transmission coming? A 5 or a six speed would compliment the car well, especially on twisty roads, or the road course.

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Racer X said:

 

It would have to be more than a quart low to have trouble picking up oil at idle (assuming the car is not moving).

My first car was a 62 Impala with a 283. It leaked at the front and rear seals, the oil pan, and the rocker covers. It still ran great when I used that car up and sold it to the junk man, probably the only useful thing left.

I was pretty hard on that car.

My second car was a 64 Chevelle, 2 door post. I yanked the 6 banger out and dropped in a 327, and a 2 speed Powerglide out of a 65 Chevelle hardtop a buddy had that he totalled. It leaked oil, but not as bad as the 283 in the Impala.

I sold that car and bought a 65 Comet Caliente, 289, 3 speed full syncro floor shift. It didn't leak oil, or burn any.  Fun car. Fast car.

My next car was a 66 Impala SS396, Turbo 400, posi rear end. The rear main leaked a little bit, but not enough to make me want to pull the tranny to fix it. Besides, I nearly went broke keeping tires in the rear wheels. 

After too many tickets I traded it straight across for a 66 VW Beetle. It didn't leak oil. It was a fun car to load up with beer and 3 buddies, then go up into the  mountains where only 4x4's dare run. If we did run into a stretch that was impassable, we all got out, picked up the front of the car and swung it around. Otherwise we always had a good time watching the reactions from the 4x4s when we reached the top of a particulary difficult stretch of road.

After that I bought a 72 Camaro. I did't leak oil. An old timer I apprenticed under showed me how to seal up Chevy engines.

A while later I discovered Datsuns, started racing one, and bought a 73 GMC dually with a 396 to pull the race trailer. Using the secrets imparted by the sage mentioned earlier, I sealed it up. It was a good truck, and later replaced by a 75 Chevy 3500 dually with a 454. Again, leaking was addressed and that rig served me well.

In 2001 I replaced it with a brand new Ram 3500, Cummins 5.9 24 valve and NVG 6 speed manual. I just gave it a 140,000 mile oil and filter change, rotated the tires and adjusted air pressures, and gave it a full inspection. I doesn't leak anything but torque.


By the way, I like the color you shot the car with. What is it from? Looks a bit like the bright colors used on the Dodge and Plymouth muscle cars of the early 70's.

Is a manual transmission coming? A 5 or a six speed would compliment the car well, especially on twisty roads, or the road course.

 

 

 

you've owned  lot of my dream cars, thats really really cool! the paint color i used is from tcp global, its called "Royal Crown Purple" https://tcpglobal.com/products/kus-umb-8011-qt_2, its a urethane based paint, i couldn't decide between red and blue and  so purple seemed to be the best compromise.  

as far as transmissions i like the 700r4 but i do agree that a manual would a lot of fun, but i don't have the budget for that at the moment. however i will be putting a gated shifter on the transmission so i can choose and hold each gear similar to a manual, but it still won't quite be the same. maybe when i inevitably explode the 700r4 it'll get manual swapped.

with sealing the chevy engines do you have any advice you could give? i'm replacing all the gaskets and cleaning all the surfaces beforehand but is there some secret tricks to make them last longer/seal better? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sealing is the same for any engine that uses gaskets. Get high quality fiber based gaskets, not cork. Cork gaskets will leak before you even install them.

For the oil pan, timing cover and rocker covers, be sure the flanges are straight, flat and true. No deformation around the bolt holes.

Clean the mating surfaces with lacquer thinner using clean lint free rags, and wipe dry with another clean dry rag. This is important. The cleaning solvent must be wiped off before it dries, or any contamination will be left behind, and the sealer will not adhere properly.


Apply a thin film of grey RTV (if there is squeeze out, you used too much), apply the gasket, apply more RTV to the other side, install the cover or pan and the bolts.

Only run the bolts down finger tight (I use a 1/4 drive deep socket). Let it sit overnight.

Pull the bolts out and add one drop of blue LocTite 242 to each one and reinstall. Then torque every bolt to the torque spec for the fastener size.

Do not overtighten.

For the intake manifold, again, don’t use cork gaskets. If I recall correctly, rubber gaskets come with the intake gasket set for the front and rear of the valley. A thin film of grey RTV on both sides, and an extra dab at the right and left ends where the surface transitions to the cylinder head (there was a GM service bulletin on this back in the day). The better quality gasket sets will have silicone sealer preapplied to the gaskets common to the head and intake manifold, so no additional sealer is needed there.

If there is any squeeze out, you have too much sealer on. The excess can break off, get picked up by the oil pump and clog small oil passages in the crank, and valve train, resulting in lubrication failure.

Like with the pan and covers, thread the bolts finger tight, wait overnight, then pull the bolts, add a drop of blue LocTite 242, and torque to spec.

The distributor only needs a paper gasket, with no sealer. Again, do not use cork.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Racer X said:

Sealing is the same for any engine that uses gaskets. Get high quality fiber based gaskets, not cork. Cork gaskets will leak before you even install them.

For the oil pan, timing cover and rocker covers, be sure the flanges are straight, flat and true. No deformation around the bolt holes.

Clean the mating surfaces with lacquer thinner using clean lint free rags, and wipe dry with another clean dry rag. This is important. The cleaning solvent must be wiped off before it dries, or any contamination will be left behind, and the sealer will not adhere properly.


Apply a thin film of grey RTV (if there is squeeze out, you used too much), apply the gasket, apply more RTV to the other side, install the cover or pan and the bolts.

Only run the bolts down finger tight (I use a 1/4 drive deep socket). Let it sit overnight.

Pull the bolts out and add one drop of blue LocTite 242 to each one and reinstall. Then torque every bolt to the torque spec for the fastener size.

Do not overtighten.

For the intake manifold, again, don’t use cork gaskets. If I recall correctly, rubber gaskets come with the intake gasket set for the front and rear of the valley. A thin film of grey RTV on both sides, and an extra dab at the right and left ends where the surface transitions to the cylinder head (there was a GM service bulletin on this back in the day). The better quality gasket sets will have silicone sealer preapplied to the gaskets common to the head and intake manifold, so no additional sealer is needed there.

If there is any squeeze out, you have too much sealer on. The excess can break off, get picked up by the oil pump and clog small oil passages in the crank, and valve train, resulting in lubrication failure.

Like with the pan and covers, thread the bolts finger tight, wait overnight, then pull the bolts, add a drop of blue LocTite 242, and torque to spec.

The distributor only needs a paper gasket, with no sealer. Again, do not use cork.

 

 

I have to add one thing.

The L series engine cam cover gasket doesn’t require any sealer. The correct gasket (remember, don’t use the cork ones!) will seal perfectly, and can be reused over and over, dozens of times. Torque the cover bolts every time you install it.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

quick update:

engine has been fully assembled, only had to do some minor grinding on the block for clearance of the rod caps and bolts, and of course they forgot to send the flexplate so i had to wait for that after 3days of customer service calls, but they were nice so i didn't really care.  i sealed everything to RacerX's advice so now the engine should hold oil as intended, lots of nice parts so i'm excited to get it running!

Engine and trans are back in the car, currently working out how to make these headers fit, if i can get the driverside to fit then ill just use a blockhugger on the passenger side for the time being. i borrowed an oxy acetylene torch from a friend and the goal is the bend the collector slightly so that it stops hitting the frame rail allowing the header to bolt up, and i've made a sizeable dent in the primaries to clear the gearbox, but i'm out of oxygen so i'm waiting on another tank before i can finish that task.  

i drained the fuel cell today, gonna replace all of the rubber lines and the fuel pump. i installed a fuel pressure regulator as well so that i can monitor that and keep the carb from flooding at idle.  

car sits almost a full inch higher than before just from the amount of weight removed from it, and it has a much simpler look now which makes me happy. i'm gonna have to get a cage fairly soon, i'm thinking the jegs 12pt cage for the 240z and just modifying it slightly to fit the zx(if anyone has done this chime in with your experience), i have a good welder and a tubing notcher so install can only be so impossible, but that'll be a summer project.  i attached some pics hopefully of the engine on the stand and of my girlfriend and i installing the engine and some misc snapchat stories from building the engine and stuff. ill update again when its making loud noises!

IMG_3622.jpg

IMG_3630.jpg

IMG_3730.jpg

D010645F-907A-4055-831A-B543F26E2808.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

finally got the car to run, and i drove it today, my what a blast that was until the trans died and i had to tow it home, and ****ed up my truck in the process. i had slack in the throttle cable so i could only get about half pull, but it would still break the tires loose in  3rd at 50mph, so time for better rubber, im getting some nitto nt05s installed tomorrow in a 235/40R17 front and a 275/40r17 rear so hopefully they will grip better. also note to future self if i need to replace the dizzy again i need to advance it more than i think.  

 

i did eventually get the lt1 longtube headers to fit my car, but its very far from just a bolt in and go kinda deal, definitely wouldn't advise unless you have more patience than a saint times 1000.  if anyone wants a full writeup on what i did to make them fit i can post one, but itd really be so much better just to get a custom one made.

also the car now leaks oil worse than it did before and its pissing me off, but its simples fixes, the first leaks are the fittings on my remote oil filter, i had to relocate to clear headers, but i was able to put the oil filter right behind the hole where the i6 airbox would've gone, allowing me to get somewhat of a cooling effect on the filter.  the second issue is my valvecovers, the stamped steel dented around the bolt holes and lost any sealing capabilities so it leaks a fair bit onto the header, making a constant massive smokeshow and coating my windshield in oil. i ordered new valvecovers that are a cast aluminum so that they have a much thicker gasket surface that i can make seal better.  after these areas are addressed it should seal, everything except those two has been sealing fine without issue

my brother and i went to go look at an 82 for him, still with the original i6, it is in much better shape than mine was at first, so hopefully it works out for him, i think itll be cool both having Z's.  he rode with me today as we were breaking it in and it was a lot of fun, hes been helping me these past few nights waking up at 7am and going to bed at 3am just trying to get the car done, and ive been appreciative of that

i lost a trans cooler line while i was out and drained the transmission while i was driving, i think how much i abuse this trans is really proof that they arent as bad as people say they are if you do the necessary mods to them(bascially just a shift kit and up the line pressure some).   ill replace the line with something better, change filter and inspect trans for damage and call it a day. in the process i had to trailer it home, and my dad forgot to lock the hitch to the ball, so when i drove onto the trailer it jumped up and slammed into my tailgate, it made me shed a manly tear, but it still opens and closes so im just gonna pretend the dent and hole in the tailgate doesn't exist, besides would it really be a toyota if i didn't constantly beat the stuffing out of it?

ill upload some pics of the car and some videos of driving it, the videos are definitely a volume on deal with how nice the open headers sound, carb still needs some tuning but the engine only has 27miles on it, lots of mid throttle acceleration then letting the car engine brake to establish a good ring wear pattern, basically just running from 2000-4000 rpm with no more than half throttle, and a bunch of in between stuff,   feel free to leave comments or ask questions

IMG_4320.jpg

IMG_4304.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.