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I hate Chinese "Metal"

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2 year old Napa premium $70 brake disks seized to hub of my daughter's Rav4.  The "steel" rots and expands between the inside of the rotor and outside of the hub to pinch them onto the hub.  I used lots of copper antiseize but to no avail. It is not a chemical bond but physical expansion of the flaking Chinese $^!#.  Of the 4 threaded holes in the two rotors used for their removal, 3 stripped and the last actually cracked the rotor!  Pure $^!#.

 

Just ordered replacements from Toyota.

 

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Post a picture!  We love pictures.  Make sure you include the "Made in China" stamp.

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Might be chasing your tail 246...

Edit - actually, these guys might make the rotors - http://www.advics-na.com/AdvicsPages/global network.aspx  The globe is global now.

These guys, the pads - 

http://akebonobrakes.com/OEM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akebono_Brake_Industry

image.png

Edited by Zed Head

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Thought I'd also chime in about Chinese "Metal".  We got a flat on the left front late last year on our 09 Altima coupe. After removing the donut spare I had to raise the car a bit higher to install the fixed tire. As I was cranking the jack, my wife rolled the tire over. She helps out because I have a muscular disease, CMT. Anyhow, the car was high enough to almost get the tire on when the jack collapsed. The rotor banged down on the inside of the rim. I had to use my hydraulic jack to finish. On the side of the Nissan jack "made in China" was stamped, junk. The nut, where the threaded spindle goes into was stripped. I had only used the jack 3 or 4 times before. I did replace the front shocks before the cold weather, used the hydraulic jack, and jack stands.

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Fred you are lucky. Falling cars from crap metal ...cripes!

 

I'm going to start logging this crap on a web page.

 

The problem can easily be fixed by having the crap vetted on entry into North America... effectively a "quality wall".

China manufacturers must pay for quality and health and safety officers who are North American citizens who vet every shipment.

If China won't do QA and H&S in China then we should do it here on their dime to balance fair costs of real manufacturing and protect ourselves at same time.

 

I hate China crap every time the temp drops near freezing and the Garmin GPS power cable in my car freezes solid.... great Chinese fake rubber at its  best.

 

Edited by 240260280

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Isn't it more the case that NA companies that have their products manufactured in China don't want to pay for a quality product?   China is capable of producing a piece of crap that looks the part at a very low price and that is why NA companies have their stuff produced there. I think Chinese manufactures are given a rock bottom price point and specs to work to from by companies like  AC Delco, Motorcraft, Delta, Stanley even Milwaukee because those companies simply want higher profits and more repeat sales. As backward as China can be towards its own people I don't believe they are the real villains here, I would put that squarely on the shoulders of greedy NA companies and stingy NA consumers. Walmart prices rule.

 

Edited by grannyknot
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I think it is both but more China itself.  

I used Chinese kit when I worked for a Chinese company and the metal in their products made for the Chinese market and rest-of-world market was pure crap:  stripped threads, no reinforcing, "soft" bolts, chromed EMF edge shielding that crumbled like snow when inserting a circuit pack. 

 

My friends in China only bought non-Chinese produced goods when possible.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Fred Sigarto said:

. On the side of the Nissan jack "made in China" was stamped, junk. 

The manufacturers LOVE customers like this.  They can do whatever they like, take your money, and put a little stamp on the product to divert your attention from the the people truly responsible for the poor product - themselves!  

Nissan spec'ed the product, sent the specs to a Chinese company so it could be made cheaply, then took your money, now you're blaming China!  How much better can it get.  I'll bet Takata blamed China also, for defective air bags.  NASA probably blamed China for a defective O-ring.  China meddled with our last election, not Russia.  Russia used computers Made in China.

It's Nissan!  Nissan sold you the defective product.  Nissan is responsible.

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Possibly but when you get things manufactured in China, you generally need to QA every item to ensure quality.  Who can do this?  It is usually statistical samples that are required to maintain quality.... and unless you have boots on the ground who can not be bought or tricked and can take truly random samples then you are screwed as the manufacturers will play the tricks to cheat. 

 

The first rule of doing business is to know that lying is OK.

The second rule is that certifications, qualifications, and any quality document is either forged or a rubber stamp.

 

When this crooked system hits your raw materials supply chain, you get steel screws in the first  batch then white metal in all the rest until you complain.

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My point, as it always has been, is that people like you are focusing on the wrong target.  You're getting played for suckers by the manufacturers selling you cheap dangerous products.  If you don't want Made in China, then don't buy the parts.  When you're buying your new Nissan tell the salesperson that they're going to need to replace the jack before you buy the car.  Send Nissan a letter describing how their jack fell apart and almost injured somebody.

The law requiring country of manufacture to be clearly ID'ed on products was passed for people like you.  But you're not using it.  Where's the picture showing that the rusty rotor was made in China?  You don't even know, you just use China as the foil for all of your frustrations with the world.  Then try to bring others in to start a session.  

Post that picture or some evidence that the rotor was Made in China.

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Phillip I thought about your hatred for the chinese crap as I put up a few ceiling fans.  Every screw rounded off/out.  I thought of "Phillip's headed cheap Chinese crews" they wouldn't even stick to my magnetic bit holder.  needless to say I had many cold dogs after I was done.  They're up and balanced but closer inspection shows chewed up screwheads.  Rental house so I'm gonna let it go, let it go let it go let it go.

jenny says, LET IT GO

 

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 I'm old enough to remember back into the fifties when almost all things (especially toys) that came from Japan were crap. It didn't take but a decade or two for them to change that. South Korea, Viet Nam, etc are other examples. China has had a couple of decades to make a noticeable improvement. Unfortunately, I don't see much improvement. 

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4 hours ago, Zed Head said:

My point, as it always has been, is that people like you are focusing on the wrong target.  You're getting played for suckers by the manufacturers selling you cheap dangerous products.  If you don't want Made in China, then don't buy the parts.  When you're buying your new Nissan tell the salesperson that they're going to need to replace the jack before you buy the car.  Send Nissan a letter describing how their jack fell apart and almost injured somebody.

The law requiring country of manufacture to be clearly ID'ed on products was passed for people like you.  But you're not using it.  Where's the picture showing that the rusty rotor was made in China?  You don't even know, you just use China as the foil for all of your frustrations with the world.  Then try to bring others in to start a session.  

Post that picture or some evidence that the rotor was Made in China.

But how hard is it to **** up a rotor.... the easiest thing to make on a car? It is made with one metal, on tools that have been around for hundreds of years, it has no moving parts, yet they turn it into a polished turd by making it look like a rotor but use the worst steel known to mankind.

 

The only lesson I learned is that the crooks at Napa sell $15 to $70 rotors that are all the same Chinese $^!#.  None are worth buying.

  • Haha 1

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1 hour ago, Mark Maras said:

 I'm old enough to remember back into the fifties when almost all things (especially toys) that came from Japan were crap. It didn't take but a decade or two for them to change that. South Korea, Viet Nam, etc are other examples. China has had a couple of decades to make a noticeable improvement. Unfortunately, I don't see much improvement. 

Hah, I remember those days, Made Japan was a not good. I know China can make good quality when given a proper price point, I own a set of micrometers and a .000ths" dial gauge that are Chinese made and they are the finest measuring tools I own, beautiful quality, bought them about 25 yrs ago now. China's poor quality is the symptom, the problem is the West's insaitable hunger for more and more consumable stuff.

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Try not to cringe at the Premium Napa Metal from China.

Yes it is a rotor...not the rusted hull of the titanic.

Neat thing is that the rust makes the rotor thicker over time so it will always exceed the minimum wear thickness.:facepalm:

 

chinese crap.jpg

 

chinese crap2.jpg

chinese crap1.jpg

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Salt in the air from the Atlantic ocean (as fog and ocean spray), road salt, and daily winter temperature changes above and below freezing ensure all metal in this region gets a thorough thrashing of salty brine. 

It is easy to see the good metal from the bad metal.

The Walker exhaust I put on my Rav is made from the same cheap crap and looks as bad as the rotor after a year! The original Toyota stuff lasts ~ 10 years or more.

I would not buy a Korean car or Mazda here due to their accelerated rusting (compared to Honda and Toyota).  Nissan and Subaru fall in between.

 

 

Edited by 240260280

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What about an alloy makes it rust worse than another alloy?

I worked in a chemical plant at one time and they made acid based dyes among other things. The filter presses looked like that rotor. Valve handles looked like they were made out of old grape vines

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240260280 I followed a Rav 4 from gulf shores all the way to Birmingham Tuesday.  Girl never got below 90, 100mph was the top though. Must have a shut down speed?  I thought about you. Those are some tough cars. 8^)

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55 minutes ago, grannyknot said:

Got to do your own brake work, so many thieves.

Not my favorite task fpr a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, but it's probably saved me $5k over the life of the '06 daily driver that I've owned since new.  And I get to choose the rotors and pads.

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