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Stolen Z?


Humbug

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Starting a list

Hotwire, slip it into neutral and push onto trailer, dig a hole underneath and let it drop into secret underground garage, helicopter lift via straps, tell tow truck driver to take it to your house, slip the owner a pill during dinner then take the keys, via hot air balloon lift but need to work out logistics. Bash out window and find the hidden key under the visor and start it,  Hope it’s a race car and starts via a flip switch…

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Are you trying to figure out how to protect your Z?

  1. Locked garage
  2. Armed security
  3. Live in a gated community with security
  4. Always park so the drive wheels are inaccessible
  5. Pull the rotor out of the distributor cap and put it in your pocket
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I didn’t realize my question was so ridiculous.
I’m currently replacing my ignition switch and am wondering how important it is to break off the special screws. That made me think of how these old cars are stolen. I see mention every now and then where someone says their car has been stolen. Sometimes they mention how, but often do not. 
So, I’m interested in how to protect my car against theft, and learning how cars have been taken would be helpful information. 

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I didn’t realize my question was so ridiculous

People just cautious about letting the vast amount of knowledge we have here be used in a way to hurt someone s30 community.

if you don’t use those security screws it’s going to be easy to defeat the steering wheel lock. 

123ignitions have a Bluetooth security setting that kills the ignition.

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Stealing a stock Z? For me... Gone in 60 seconds and I wouldn't care at all whether the security screws were broken off or not. You need something more elaborate than that.

2 hours ago, AZDatsun said:

Starting a list

Hotwire, slip it into neutral and push onto trailer, dig a hole underneath and let it drop into secret underground garage, helicopter lift via straps, tell tow truck driver to take it to your house, slip the owner a pill during dinner then take the keys, via hot air balloon lift but need to work out logistics. Bash out window and find the hidden key under the visor and start it,  Hope it’s a race car and starts via a flip switch…

Great list. Let me add...

Break a window, reach in and open the hood, disconnect the steering coupler donut, jumper the starter solenoid, and then use the starter to crank the car to your place while steering by kicking the front tires in the direction you want to go. Bring extra batteries just in case the PO was having alternator troubles. Or a charger and a really long extension cord.

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The fact is these cars are easy to steal. Even today’s cars with chipped keys, and electronic gimcracks and gewgaws are easily stolen. 

If a thief wants something, there isn’t much keeping him from taking it short of an armed guard.

Locks are for honest people.

Me?

If I leave my Z anywhere that there is a concern for its security, I remove the coil wire and rotor. 

Of course that doesn’t stop a n’er do well from dragging it onto a trailer or flat deck wrecker and hauling it away.
 

 

 

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3 hours ago, SteveJ said:

Are you trying to figure out how to protect your Z?

  1. Locked garage
  2. Armed security
  3. Live in a gated community with security
  4. Always park so the drive wheels are inaccessible
  5. Pull the rotor out of the distributor cap and put it in your pocket

I always liked pulling the rotor.

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Not sure its wise, but with all my vintage cars I have owned, I've always left them unlocked (short term stay). I figured since I dont leave anything worth value in my cars, its better to let them get in and rummage and leave, instead of sourcing windows, fixing scrapped paint and dents.

Like Speed Racers brother said, if someone wants in, there getting in, might as well soften the blow and cost.

I do like some of the camera tech thats out there now that records on any bump of the car or break in.

Edited by DC871F
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Not sure its wise, but with all my vintage cars I have owned, I've always left them unlocked (short term stay). I figured since I dont leave anything worth value in my cars, its better to let them get in and rummage and leave, instead of sourcing windows, fixing scrapped paint and dents.
Like Speed Racers brother said, if someone wants in, there getting in, might as well soften the blow and cost.
I do like some of the camera tech thats out there now that records on any bump of the car or break in.

I do exactly that for exactly those reasons!

When away from home, in addition to electronic immobilisation, it’s wheel clamped. I also take the wheel clamp in the boot to use at overnight stay events. But even in that situation, if they want it, they will lift it off the ground or bring a battery powered angle grinder / power drill and drill out the lock.

All you can do is delay them or make it difficult. Case in point as mentioned, modern cars!
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The biggest insurance policy vintage car owners have these days is that fewer criminals know how to operate a manual transmission. That said, a roll-back defeats pretty much any/all anti-theft devices, and if someone really wants your car, they'll get it.

 

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I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who has had a Z stolen.  While probably a few of us have had a car stolen (I've had two - a Toyota Camry and a Porsche 914), hearing the details of a stolen Z could be informative.

Edited by psdenno
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I prefer Lojack and a 44 mag. It removes the source of the problem. Someone here mentioned security hardware. Are you talking about the nuts that attach the steering column to the brace? I still think notification and a 44 is the way to go. I live in a county that promotes it.

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The replies to this thread I startedhave been interesting. However, they are all sort of theoretical.

No one whose Z was stolen has said how it was done.

Nor has anyone who has thwarted a would-be thief said how it was done.

Someone mentioned the gps trackers. One night, I got home about 10:30 to find two police cars in my driveway. Fortunately, they didn't have their red and blue lights on and, fortunately, I was not drunk..

One of them told me a woman had had her modern mustang stolen from a repair shop a few blocks away from my house, and the gps tracker pointed to my house as the location of the car.  

The police asked to have a looksee into my garages, where they found no mustangs. They seemed sort of blasé about the matter and said those trackers were unreliable.

That was probably four years ago, so maybe the trackers are more accurate now.

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Maybe someone found the tracker and stuck it on one of your cars

I think like many things, trackers are a get what you pay for item

As for the 44 mag, I live in a very law enforcement minded community but lethal force in a theft situation is gonna get you in some serious trouble.

 

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1 hour ago, Patcon said:

Maybe someone found the tracker and stuck it on one of your cars

I think like many things, trackers are a get what you pay for item

As for the 44 mag, I live in a very law enforcement minded community but lethal force in a theft situation is gonna get you in some serious trouble.

 

Yes. I own a few firearms, and knowing when to deploy them will keep you from queuing up for chow for 10-30 years. Nobody has a sense of humor nowadays.

 

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11 minutes ago, DC871F said:

Yes. I own a few firearms, and knowing when to deploy them will keep you from queuing up for chow for 10-30 years. Nobody has a sense of humor nowadays.

 

Hard to get the humor on the forum sometimes...

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7 minutes ago, Patcon said:

Hard to get the humor on the forum sometimes...

Maybe, I was referring to the Judge that would be handing you a sentence after perforating a thug.

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I know my Z was repossessed by a California based bank on 1989. I have the bank repo sheet. So I think it’s experienced the means of theft.
Defeating theft is pretty easy, you need to focus on the 95% of would be thieves. Covering the last 5% is difficult and expensive. Most thieves don’t want to spend 20 mins trying to steal a car. Anything more than 5 mins becomes risky unless they have a place the car is hidden like a barn or garage that they can work while the owner is away. But for a casual evening out for dinner with the wife you don’t need anything too elaborate. Something as simple as puling out the coil spark plug wire or a discrete coil disconnect switch would stop 98% of the walker-by thieves.
My recently restored 1966 VW was stolen while I was deployed to Afghanistan in 2002. Stolen from a repair shop, was what I was told. Could have been the shop owner..who knows. I never saw the car again, never really got compensated because it was an old car and the insurance company said it was only worth $600. It was worth about $6,000 in reality and would be three times that today.


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