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Battery Frame Bolt - Found it!


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Disregard.  Some digging in a parts box resulted in finding it.  105º in the garage this morning.

 

Screen Shot 2021-06-24 at 8.24.05 AM.png

Edited by psdenno
Found requested bolt.
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  • psdenno changed the title to Battery Frame Bolt - Found it!

2 hours ago, psdenno said:

Disregard.  Some digging in a parts box resulted in finding it.  105º in the garage this morning.

 

Screen Shot 2021-06-24 at 8.24.05 AM.png

But it's a dry heat...

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3 hours ago, SteveJ said:

But it's a dry heat...

Most of the time, like last week when it was 123º.  Today, however, it 20% humidity.  

It actually rained here yesterday.  First time since March.  A whopping 0.03 inches.  Life in the desert.

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We got rain too in AZ for the first time in months.  This week is downright chilly at only 95 - 100F compared to last week.

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9 minutes ago, psdenno said:

Most of the time, like last week when it was 123º.  Today, however, it 20% humidity.  

It actually rained here yesterday.  First time since March.  A whopping 0.03 inches.  Life in the desert.

I'll trade places with you any day, would love to live in the desert.

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24 minutes ago, psdenno said:

Most of the time, like last week when it was 123º.  Today, however, it 20% humidity.  

It actually rained here yesterday.  First time since March.  A whopping 0.03 inches.  Life in the desert.

Having spent plenty of time in the High Desert in the past, I'm impressed with 0.03 in June. Meanwhile I run a portacool in my garage to dehumidify it enough that I don't suffer heat stroke here. LOL 

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4 hours ago, SteveJ said:

Having spent plenty of time in the High Desert in the past, I'm impressed with 0.03 in June. 

Yes, the 3/100 of an inch of rain was a record breaker.  It was the first time in recorded history going back to the 1800s that it had ever rained here on June 23rd.

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I've started talking/thinking like my Grandad did when I was a kid. Seasons change, come and go about every 10 years. We have had some of the nicest weather I can remember this year. It's 78F and drizzling rain right now. Last few years have been like Hell, (from what I've been taught) miserably hot and dry. 

El Nino!

Screenshot_20210626-163441_Samsung Internet.jpg

 

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Portland, Sat. 105`, Sun. 110`, Mon. 107`, Tues. 97` & staying in the 90s for the predictable future. Summer is here in the Northwest. Fortunately, our AC can keep the house below 85`. Many people don't have AC here because one only uses it for a few days a year.

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20 minutes ago, Mark Maras said:

Portland, Sat. 105`, Sun. 110`, Mon. 107`, Tues. 97` & staying in the 90s for the predictable future. Summer is here in the Northwest. Fortunately, our AC can keep the house below 85`. Many people don't have AC here because one only uses it for a few days a year.

117º here today.  Both central air systems in our zoned house are running pretty much nonstop.  We added 30 solar panels to our roof in January and hopefully won't have $700/month electric bills this summer as we typically have had in the past.  

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I put a PV system on our house in December.  I've been really pleased so far. I will probably expand it at some point

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9 hours ago, Patcon said:

I put a PV system on our house in December.  I've been really pleased so far. I will probably expand it at some point

Photovoltaic? Is it still the case that the panels will never pay for themselves in savings or has the efficiency improved enough?

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2 hours ago, grannyknot said:

Photovoltaic? Is it still the case that the panels will never pay for themselves in savings or has the efficiency improved enough?

Well that really depends. Lots of moving parts. What the system cost, if there are any tax credits or rebates, KwH costs and peak rate costs and such.

For me, being a contractor, I opted for DIY. Now I got a couple of quotes from local PV installers in the $45k-$52k range for about a 10Kw system. Here in the states, in SC I get about 50% as a straight tax credit. So if I owe $5k and have a $5k credit, they offset each other and I pay nothing. So essentially the system costs half of what the initial cost was. Now, this is all provided you owe taxes and in a sufficient amount to be able to use the tax credit. For many years with a large family and relatively low income these number didn't work for us.

I just couldn't make the numbers work for me at the quoted prices. So I found a complete system online and installed it my self.

24 LG 330w panels triple black with Enphase micro inverters and an Enphase combiner. This means that the power leaving the panels is AC current as the DC is converted as it exits the panel. This is much easier for me as I am familiar with working with AC power. DC is a lot more dangerous and cable sizing is completely different for DC power.

I paid about $13K for a 7.9Kw array and had another $3k or so in misc, conduit, wire and labor to install it. After the rebates I figure it's paid for in about 60 months. So far I have been really pleased with getting much smaller power bills even with 3 teenagers still at home. I need to reroof the main part of the house and when I do that I will probably expand the system to be close to net Zero. I would also like to have a stand by battery system. Enphase has a new battery designed for their system. They are still quite expensive though. Battery backup adds more complexity too because you need magnetic transfer switches to protect utility workers.

Chris,

I am sure you are technically capable of doing this type of work! Whether your local municipality and power utility will let you is another question. The other issue is the roof work. None of he system parts are very heavy. Even the panels are only 30#s or so. But my roof is only 6:12 so 22 1/2d of pitch. Almost perfect for my latitude. A steeper roof would be more challenging but my coworker is still very young and his balance is good which makes it a lot easier. We took about 2 days for install but like many things we could probably do it twice as fast the second time.

Hope that helps

Sorry for the thread jacking

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3 hours ago, grannyknot said:

Photovoltaic? Is it still the case that the panels will never pay for themselves in savings or has the efficiency improved enough?

We get the 26% federal tax credit on our system and the estimated time to recoup the cost is about 6 to 7 years.  Ours started producing in January and by May we had we had a $600 credit with the electric company.  Our only monthly electric bills have been a few dollars for the monthly connection fee the electric company charges.

We inquired about including a battery system along with the panels and were told by two companies it was an unnecessary cost and not to do it.  A single battery won't run the entire house and the cost is about $14,000 per battery.  A less expensive solution to power failures or brownouts is a natural gas generator or the new electric Ford 150 pickup which can be used to power the house in emergencies.

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I had a customer who bought an old 4x4 Ford explorer. He took the rear driver shaft and connected it to a generator. He could run his whole house off of it. He could move it around using the front drive of the 4x4. It made a really discreet quiet generator!

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