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1971 HLS30-14938 "Lily" build


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Ok, I need some ideas from you guys:

 I have been working on blocking out the car and checking panels. So a few years ago I did all the filling, primer and blocking on the rear hatch and then I shot yellow on the underside and edges.There are several areas on the lower flat of the hatch that have more than a skim coat of filler. Around the latch is one of these areas. I finally found the lock sets last weekend and put the lock in the hatch hole. I am not sure I can get the retainer on the back of the latch because of the overall thickness of the metal and the filler. There is very little of the slot showing on the lock cylinder. This spot is about an 1/8" overall in thickness. I don't know how thick the panel metal is. I suspect the panel is a little caved in from being closed over and over. 

So here is the problem. I like the idea of making the filler thinner, especially around the lock set. I am not sure I can pull the panel to make the filler thinner around the lock set. I wasn't sure shrinking the metal would work. I have concerns that if I try shrinking the panel that it won't be the correct shape. The hatch has a curve left to right. I do not know if the panel has a curve top to bottom. If it's supposed to be flat top to bottom, then shrinking my help. Also do anyone have ideas on how lift the center of the panel. I think the stud welder would just make a mess. I might be able to run a long flat block on the inside of the panel, tie a wire to it and use some light pulling to lift the dented area. If I go the shrinking route I will have to strip the hatch and start over.

Thoughts?

20181030_152816[1].jpg

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2 hours ago, grannyknot said:

You could leave the hatch alone and shave a little bit off of the cylinder lock notch so it acommodates the thickness of the filler.

Is there room enough under the center panel to get a small bottle jack in there?

That's a good thought. I will look at the lock set. I am not sure there is enough metal there to make the slot wider. That's a good idea though.

No, on the bottle jack, but I own a porta-power. I have a small puck jack that might go into the space in the hatch. I am not sure the inner frame is strong enough to use as a backstop though. That is also an idea worth pursuing.

I didn't spend a lot of time trying to get the lock into the hatch Saturday because the contortions were killing me. I hope to look at it closer this coming weekend

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My hatch has a top-to-bottom curve that's roughly the same as the horizontal curve. I think that's how it should be, but my hatch was in fairly rough shape, so I'm probably no authority here. Actually, mine *was* flat when I started... Stud welder and shrinking disk didn't help, but I was very much learning on the fly. Replacing the missing pad behind the panel did the trick for me. That said, if you're happy with how it looks now, unfixing it might not be the best move. Grannyknot's suggestion to embiggen the lock sounds good to me.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

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17 hours ago, charliekwin said:

My hatch has a top-to-bottom curve that's roughly the same as the horizontal curve. I think that's how it should be, but my hatch was in fairly rough shape, so I'm probably no authority here. Actually, mine *was* flat when I started... Stud welder and shrinking disk didn't help, but I was very much learning on the fly. Replacing the missing pad behind the panel did the trick for me. That said, if you're happy with how it looks now, unfixing it might not be the best move. Grannyknot's suggestion to embiggen the lock sounds good to me.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk
 

Thanks for the feed back.

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So I think I made progress on the hatch. I rigged up a slide hammer with a wire loop

20181104_123043.jpg20181104_123046.jpg.

I had Cody hold the hatch down while I did the hammering. I did some shrinking with the shrinking disc and I over did it. I ended up with divots and had to dolly them back up some :facepalm:

Blocked it all down again. The circled spots are low now. I also used the same technique to lift the vent areas on the hatch.

20181104_135909.jpg

It's pretty thin now. It also looks like the lock will work now. I now have to do some filling and reprime the hatch and block it again with guide coat.

20181104_135936.jpg

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21 hours ago, lordkarma88 said:

STOP THE HAMMERING!

 


Sent from my OP 3T using Classic Zcar Club mobile
 

Be mindful that not all of our members live in the hill country of Texas. We as a forum group have done a good job of not letting politics get in the way of our fellowship and enjoyment of our cars. We have members from all parts of the US and I am sure we are not monolithic in our political views, and we don't need to be to enjoy getting together and inhaling exhaust fumes. It would probably be best to leave posts that include politics or political views unsubmitted... Just my 2cents

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  • 3 weeks later...

I ordered these screws for the turn signal lenses

20181005_152936.jpg

Here is the finished repair on the one signal body

20181007_165511.jpg20181007_165519.jpg

The screws had a small plastic washer on them. I thought I would use a small rubber O ring unless there is a better idea

20181007_165547.jpg

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I am in the midst of blocking the whole car and doing the fine filler work. There is always another spot you missed. I am still waiting on my Australian help to arrive! I also had a problem spot on one side of my hood. My hood is a 25 year old after market hood so it has some issues. One was at the upper left corner, it turned in significantly and showed badly against the inspection door.

20181125_150537.jpg

So I added to the edge with the welder. It wouldn't looked so bad if I had stripped the primer back further

20181125_162409.jpg

Shaped it down

20181126_165408.jpg

A little short strand fiberglass to seal it up. It might need a touch of filler, but it is much straighter

20181126_180203.jpg

Edited by Patcon
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The wire speed might be a little bit high, but it prevents burn back like that. The gas was on but when the primer burns it makes it look like that. That was a half dozen quick welds. One time I burned through it. I had to keep moving the voltage around depending on where on the edge I was welding. I really just wanted to add enough to then knock it down. So I stacked it in different ways until there was enough there.

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14 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

Speaking of such related things... I just asked Santa for a new auto-darkening welding helmet to replace my current one. I'm tired of getting flashed.  (No Cliff... Not that kind of flashed.   :blink:    )

I need to get Cody a new hat. He get's some flash. My hat does pretty good at responding. What hat are you looking at?

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Get ready for a lot of words...

Let me first explain why I'm looking for a new helmet in the first place. My current helmet (Horror Freight blue design) works pretty well with the MIG, but won't stay dark with the TIG. I'm assuming that the TIG currents are just too low and it won't pick up the arc. Either that, or I'm shadowing the sensor with my work position. In any event, it flashes me with the TIG.

And just recently, I was doing some under-car exhaust work on the family Truckster, and my HF blue flashed me even with the MIG. Something about the working position again... Must have blocked the sensor or something. Once I finished the tack welds under the car, I pulled the parts out and finished the job on easels in the driveway and it was fine. Just something about the position under the car.

So I've had it...  I busted my balls on that car job and saved over a thousand bucks by throwing labor at it instead of new parts. With the money saved (think "unrealized expense"), I think I deserve a new tool so I can do a better job next time. I figure even if I spend a couple hundred of that saved thousand, I'm still way ahead in the end AND I've got a new helmet! Right?

I deserve that, right?  Who's with me??    LOL

Anyway, that's where I'm coming from. I wanted something more reliable with more sensors and rated for lower TIG current.

So I did a bunch of investigation into helmets and came to multiple conclusions. First of which is that asking people what is the best helmet is like asking someone "What is the best brand of tools." and is likely to start a religious war. Beyond that, I did some reading of on-line reviews. Here's a couple examples:
https://welderportal.com/
http://weldinghelmetexpert.com/
https://weldinghelmetpros.com/

And here's one that talks about the EU's relatively new rating system being used as an attempt to provide some objectivity to the highly subjective topic of viewing quality:
https://www.thefabricator.com/article/safety/1-1-1-1-clarity

All the top of the line helmets seem to be great. Optrel 684, Speedglas 9100, Miller Elite, Jackson BH3, Lincoln 3350. All fantastic, and even with the unrealized expense, they're still all more money than I can justify spending. However, there is also one lower priced contender that just kept popping up... The Antra AH6-260-0000. This one seems to be very highly rated despite the costs. It's seemed to be at the very top of everyone's "Best helmet for the money" category.

So, I was just about ready to pull the trigger on the Antra AH6-260-0000 when I noticed that all the sensors are in a line across the top of the window. I can picture welding positions where all of these sensors get blocked. Might be very unlikely, but I think it's possible.

In the end, I went with the Lincoln 2450, and here's why. It's got the same optical technology as the very highly rated 3540, but has a smaller viewing window, and hence a lower price tag. But the biggest reason I went with the Lincoln over the Antra is that it has four sensors as well, but they are in the four corners of the lens. I cannot come up with an easy way to shadow all of them at once. And it's TIG rated down to 2A or so.

I went with the cheapest "Name brand" helmet I could find with four sensors in the corners of the lens. If you think the four sensors in a line aren't an issue, then the Antra sounds like a great alternative for a lot less money.

Keep in mind that I'm no welder. I know just enough to make myself dangerous. And light stuff on fire.

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7 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

I think I deserve a new tool so I can do a better job next time. I figure even if I spend a couple hundred of that saved thousand, I'm still way ahead in the end AND I've got a new helmet! Right?

I deserve that, right?  Who's with me??    LOL

"It's an investment honey, safer for my eyes" I get a lot of mileage out of that one.

I have the older version of the Lincoln 2450 with adjustment for sensitivity, delay and a dimmer dial, I find it's a great helmet. Very light and the viewing window is plenty big enough.

Edited by grannyknot
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Yeah, that's what I figured about the window. The 2450 will be an increase in window size from the HF blue that I've been using and I think I'll be satisfied with that. I could have easily asked Santa for the 3350, which was "only" fifty bucks more than the 2450, but I just don't think I need it. Even the 2450 should be a significant upgrade from what I've been using and the larger the lens, the heavier the helmet. So I believe the 2450 is a little lighter than the 3350.

I want to TIG again... After my last experience, I've been avoiding it. It's really unnerving to get your face really close in there, get things working properly and be concentrating on the arc when all of a sudden.... FLASH!   :blink: 

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The 2450 sounds like a good helmet. I am a little leery of any helmet that costs less than $100. Cody's helmet is a cheap HF helmet I think. It just doesn't dim fast enough when we MIG. I let him use my hat which tends to work better. I have a Viking 1840 series helmet that came with my welder. It is sort of mid price based on what you researched. I wish it responded just a little bit faster but overall it does ok.

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I looked at the 1840 as well, but I went with the 2450 instead. Not because of the larger window, but because of the four sensors and their locations.

Of course, I'm talking about all of this like it's a done deal, but it's not. I've dropped copious hints with SWMBO Clause, but who knows.    :ph34r:

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