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drpchuynh

Restoration of "One-eighty-seven"

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Looks beautiful, very nice job!   Just a few quick comments.  My  early '70 did not come with decals on the air filter so I am thinking that you would not need those.  I am not sure when the decals started showing up, but I would guess yours did not come with those originally.  Also, the timing chain cover looks unique.  Mine has ridges in it.  Maybe the early ones were flat like in your picture.

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Thanks Rich! Hopefully you can sort out the rest and match the dilapidated chassis to this engine. Yes it's my understanding that the decals came later. JDM-CAR-PARTS list the dates for the decals as 71-72. I don't have them on any of my Series 1. As for the timing chain covers, it looks like the #1610 is similar to the #187. The later ones have the ridges. Hope that helps. IMG_20180729_191523.jpg

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3 minutes ago, drpchuynh said:

Interesting that this part is painted. IMG_20180729_194728.jpg

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Possibly an over-zealous refresh. Here is a photo before the refresh:

 

image.png

 

Here is another (with green distributor cap too)

image.png

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Engine back in!

 

Rod said the brake master cylinder was "making my engine look ugly." So he built a period-correct one using a Tokico.

 

I noticed the reservoirs were backwards so I asked him about it, and he explained, "That master cylinder that was on the car was for a 280z. So the brake lines were hooked up wrong, the front to the rear the rear to the front. Not great for breaking."

 

Looking forward to firing her up! PhotoGrid_1532983977786.thumb.jpg.cdff77ec3036d935b2f829dc6d24a50e.jpg20180730_134818.jpg.61843cf0c6d6cf39581f5b32b98a53db.jpg8150.jpeg.500abac14b878facee3b434bdaca53a7.jpeg8151.jpeg.b3646d8aadac8a35f9aa2319508b9554.jpeg

 

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Rod is doing a FANTASTIC job with your engine!  The pictures really tell the story and make all of us appreciate how much work it takes to get all the details just right.  Looking forward to more progress updates.

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Thanks Hardway! I'll relay your message to him. I'm always amaze at how quickly he does things, and how knowledgeable he is with the internals of each working parts. It's easy to buy new to replace broken ones, but to have the "engineering" knowledge to tear down and rebuild 40+ year old parts that are no longer available takes a special kind of expertise.  Kudos to all of you tinkers out there that can do this sort of stuff. Hopefully you can pass that knowledge on so these cars will always have a mechanic/restorer that will keep them on the road for years to come.

 

 

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Last Sunday we fired her up! Here's the link to the completed video. If you don't have time to watch the entire video, feel free to jump to minute 3:50.



I tried uploading the video here but I think it's too large of a file. I spliced and edited the video with descriptive captions to help my viewers, especially the novice DIY-ers like myself, navigate the thought process of a master mechanic as he systematically works through the process of getting an engine fired up and idled correctly. Most of you on here probably do this in your sleep, so you'll find the descriptions elementary.

Have a great Labor Day weekend and enjoy the video!

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On 7/29/2018 at 9:42 PM, motorman7 said:

Looks beautiful, very nice job!   Just a few quick comments.  My  early '70 did not come with decals on the air filter so I am thinking that you would not need those.  I am not sure when the decals started showing up, but I would guess yours did not come with those originally.  Also, the timing chain cover looks unique.  Mine has ridges in it.  Maybe the early ones were flat like in your picture.

Confirm.  Flat timing chain covers and no decals on the air filter.

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dprchuynh, what a great story and one I can relate to.  I have a close friend who was air lifted out as an infant from an orphanage.  I so distinctly remember those times.

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Confirm.  Flat timing chain covers and no decals on the air filter.
Thank you for the confirmation. It's amazing the variations of a single piece over the run of a few years.

I'm glad your friend made it out. Earlier that day, my dad's squadron made many trips to airlift Americans and civilians to the airport. Not certain when he was airlifted, but he might have been one that my dad's squadron extracted.

Those last minute airlifts where dangerous. There were so much traffic in the air that you could have easily collided, shot down by enemy fixed wing planes, and friendly fire, as the US Navy had no way of knowing if you were friendly or foe. So what my dad ordered his squadron to do was ditch the machine guns to save weight, but more importantly, give the US Navy a clear message that you weren't hostile. That's why you see in the picture, the machine gun mount was still there but no machine gun.

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I rarely use the word "Hero" but your dad was clearly one. That was one of the best posts on this forum.  He will be in our prayers.
If for nothing else, or to no one else, he was definitely a hero to me. Thank you for the kind words.

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Someone PM me asking if dprchuynh and drpchuynh are the same member.  Yes it is.  Since they did away with the app, I forgot my registration information. So I created another through Tapatalk just to update this thread. Needless to say, I am able to get back in.  All is well.

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I just read your story to my wife. I'm 70 and she's 65, and we lived through that era and watched the war on TV.  My high school classmates (class of '69) went over, and some did not return. I'm glad your dad and your family made it out. He was clearly a remarkable and admirable gentleman. 

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Thank you Pilgrim for the kind words. If you still keep in touch with your friend, please extend my deepest gratitude for his service and sacrifices. Deployment to Vietnam was no joke.

 

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As a Marine Vietnam veteran(1966-1967) I honor your father. Peace to you my friend. Can't wait to see your restoration.

Cheers, Mike

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And as an American who risk his life to fight for my former country, my family and I thank you from the bottom of our hearts. It's a debt that we can never repay in full. All we can do to show our appreciation is to better ourselves as Americans by giving back and never forget the sacrifices that so many made in pursuit of our freedom. My respect to you and all those who wear the uniform. Thank you Mike for the kind words. Have a great Labor Day!

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Here are some updates. Rod addressed several large areas of rust before handing the car off to the body shop. The battery tray needed the most attention. The body shop will finesse the welding seams. b803ba987a2d020869c928c4a98ada73.jpg2b3ecf021069dec42e28efa8cf08dceb.jpg925b2ffab5bf0db2860c7fc2764c17b0.jpg034ec68e462f9052438d1277e5dfbcbf.jpg8275ca16a94c5164dda2ca91000197cc.jpg

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Rod informed me that both doors sustained prior damages, with the driver side door pushed in so far that it bent "the bar". That would require removal of the skin to straighten it out properly. So we decided to replace the doors instead of repair.

That would be easy enough on most 240z but it turns out the early cars had their "bamper" located in a more forward position than midway on the glass. I'm calling it a bamper because that is how it's referred to in the manual.

Rod was able to source a set of doors (orange doors in pic) but those doors too had a lot of fillers. So we decided to grab the doors off of #1610 (blue car), hence you see the passenger doors go from silver to blue and the driver door is now free of fillers. 85491bc61457d64a94b97cbf8d9bc6b0.jpg63184a3354a545723e15b18d2523b742.jpg0129beb111e96e7eaff1cd9185239166.jpg59bc7b656a73b6682f019f42e5c7dd95.jpg

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