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Glove box liner- make your own

This describes how I made a two part glove box liner for a 240Z using 3/16" thick foam board. The two parts make it easy to install: Replacement glove box liners are available from classiczcars.com vendors however I like making things so I thought I would fabricate a new liner. I considered making this out of metal but my metal working skills are not that good so I thought I would use an easier to work with cardboard like material. After I made the liner I cut it in half 3 1/2" from the left side as it would be seen installed in the car to make it easy to install (or remove later). I took the old liner out to work on the heater fan and to run speaker wiring but broke it getting it out. I like originality but wanted something easier to work with. I still have the original liner that has been repaired if needed for some reason later. Two part liner separated: Two part liner pushed together: Installing two-part liner- Step 1: Step 2: Step 3: Step 4: Installed: The 3/16" foam board I used for the liner was available at a craft store and a dollar store. It has an open cell foam core sandwiched between poster board. It is strong and resilient, much stronger and more flexible than the 40 year old original posterboard liner. I copied the liner from a 1/1972 liner I had on hand after I took it apart, flattened it out and drew lines around it on the foam board. I also took pictures of the original liner under a sheet of glass to flatten it out laid on fabric board with one inch lines going both ways to allow duplication by someone else. The color is reversed in the pictures to make the patterns easier to see. Lines can be drawn 1 inch apart going both ways on the foam board with a white pencil and a long straight edge. By referring to the patterns in the pictures the patterns can be duplicated on the foam board. Both pictures below are looking at the outside of the liner. Side and angled top patterns:...........................Main pattern (both patterns from a 1/1972 car): To make the folds I pushed a wide putty knife blade into the cardboard on a hard surface where the folds are needed as indicated in the pictures. Pattern identification: I used a spring loaded power hand stapler to staple the parts together at the folded over tabs in the same places as the original liner. I bent each staple over on the inside with needle nose pliers afterwards though glue could have been used instead to fit the parts together using magnets to temporarily hold parts together. It may be necessary to trim the two halves where they meet to get them to fit into the car, I had to trim about 1/2" off of this middle edge with scissors after I made the liner because the original liner material was thinner than what I used. The four speed nuts needed for the sides at the top I found at an auto parts store though they might also be found at a hardware store if they are not on an original liner you already have. ***************************************************** I actually made three of these liners, the third one that is in the car now is described above. The 1st one was made out of ordinary cardboard and while sufficiently sturdy for normal use I had tried to copy the original without taking it apart which introduced errors in the shape. Note that the car has steel support under the bottom of the glove box for the first three inches from the glove box door all the way across making the area near the door very strong no matter what material I might have used. The second liner was constructed from thin white cardboard and was made from the pattern in the pictures above. It fit together and in the car well but I went with foam board as it is even sturdier. For reference, here is a difference between glove box liners for a 1/1970 car and a 1/1972 car (and repair notes). I copied the 72 liner because I figured it would work in both the 1970 car I have and in later models (the drawing layouts above are for the 1/1972 car):

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

Turn switch relay mod

Hi all, I added relays to the turn switch to take the current load off the switch by copying the idea on the website below. The mod is reversible and by doing so will leave only hidden soldered wires inside the clamshell as the only evidence it was done unless holes were drilled to mount the relays. With this setup the heavy current still flows through the fusebox but only a small current flows through the turn switch itself. I followed this website posting but I used a different brand of relays and added a connector strip; I am grateful for the information: 240Z Turn Signal Switch Circuit Modification The link above is to the article contributed by: Peter Paraska As in the article I took the switch apart to scrape clean the contacts though I also sprayed all contacts with deoxit contact preserver. IMO an easy alternative to relays is to clean the contacts only and not install relays; the switch with cleaned contacts should last quite a while. I went with relays because my DD uses them, it is an 83 model and has never had a light switch problem. Inside the turn switch I soldered the rivet where it makes electrical connection as the fuse box uses similar rivets. This was done in case I return the circuit to stock, this soldered connection isn't used with relays: Turn signal switch in action, ball bearing not shown (click for animation): I have read that newer cars have one contact on each side of the "see saw" where my switch has two. I ran fine sandpaper through the two upright springy contacts being careful not to bend them back too far so I wouldn't permanently bend them however these two contacts are not used for heavy current with the relays installed. I had read that others had taken the similarly constructed headlight switch apart more than once and sometimes the tabs that hold the switch circuit board in place break off if they are bent too many times. To avoid that I bent the two corners of the smaller curved metal side of the turn switch cover out as the corners only have to bend at a small angle before the tab releases the switch circuit board thereby reducing metal fatigue. I used channel locks to squeeze the switch cover back together during reassembly as a parallel force in line with each side prevented twisting of the cover. Note that IMO it is easier to get the bearing back in if the switch is taken apart by bending the tabs rather than what I did as the reassembling parts approach each other straight on then. Ball bearing: I added a Radio Shack white strip connector to make it easy to troubleshoot/correct any wiring errors if needed. Schematic and picture of my adaption of Peter's circuit: Note that on the back of my turn switch circuit board I soldered together the white Red and Green Black wires to improve reliability as this puts two contacts in parallel. If one contact should fail the other will likely still do the job. I did the same with the White Black and Green Red wires on the turn switch for the right turn relay. Newer turn signal switches have one wire where mine has these two I understand. Relay mounting- works, but I may not leave it like this: The relays I used are the same kind described in the article, two triple pole double throw relays, but they are a different brand. Peter used a radio shack relay, part number 702012. Note that a relay rated for 15A at 240VAC isn't the same as a relay rated for 15A at DC. The DC current rating is what is important here as generally relays can handle more AC current than DC. To make sure I don't forget how to revert to stock wiring I printed a copy of the schematic and the picture of the wiring layout above and taped them to the inside of the clamshell. Mike **************************************************** This may or may not be obvious but triple pole relays are not the only option for this mod. Other relay configurations will work depending on your creativity. One possibility would be to use 6 single pole double throw relays. Each triple pole relay could be replaced by three single pole double throw relays with the three coils wired in parallel. My feeling is that triple pole relays are easier to wire because of how I think about the wiring process but someone else might work fine with another relay configuration.

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

Heater blower motor squeal stop

It is possible to lubricate both blower motor bearings without taking the motor out of the car to stop squeals or other noises related to motor bearings. I realized this after I had taken the motor out to lubricate the bearings. Many have opted to replace the existing blower motor and fan with a Honda civic heater fan. I like to fix things so I oiled the old motor because it was turning slowly and was squealing. Oiling both bearings with the fan in place in the car can be done by taking the end cover plate off of the motor keeping an eye out for the 4 washers that may be on the motor shaft. There were four on my 1/1970 car with one of the middle ones being a red fiber washer I imagine to reduce mechanical noise transmitted to the motor housing. The washers can stick to the end plate when it is removed and then drop off if they aren't noticed. The rear bearing is easy to lubricate with a light lithium grease or other suitable lubricant as it is a part of the end plate. The front bearing is easily accessed for lubrication with an old fashioned oiler that squirts oil or possibly by using WD-40 with its spray straw. WD-40 is explosive so if it is used a good airing out of the motor before reassembly might be a good idea. There are two magnets in the motor with a gap near the top of the motor between them of maybe 1/2 inch. An oil can with a long nozzle that squirts can be inserted in this gap to squirt oil up to the front bearing. WD 40 could also be used by inserting the straw that comes taped to the can in the same gap between the magnets that an oiler would use. The top gap would be preferred for the oiling as the oil can flow down to the bearing though the bottom gap can be used. When replacing the motor end cap be sure the tang gets aligned with the rubber grommet for the wires. If this isn't done the motor end cap can be installed 180 degrees out from the proper position resulting in it being slightly cocked over at an angle due to the tang sticking out which would not be good for bearing alignment with the motor shaft. Rear bearing can be seen here: Since I had already taken the motor out of the car to oil the front bearing I sat it on a workbench with the fan side down and poured motor oil into the gap between the magnets knowing it would flow down to the front bearing. I could not get the fan off and remember reading a thread where someone else ran into the same thing though your situation might be different.

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

Firewall insulation pattern for 1/1972 240Z

Here are pictures of the firewall insulation of a 1/1972 240Z on a "fabric board" with lines 1 inch apart going both ways to allow duplication if for some reason someone wanted to. Note that the top edge of all three pieces of the insulation are lined up with a blue line on the fabric board. Pictures were taken in full sun and have shadows. To clarify where the black insulation poster board ends and the shadow begins white dashed lines have been drawn. This could be printed out and the blue fabric board lines drawn as white lines with a ruler to extend what is on the fabric board across the black insulation to make duplication easier. Or start with a fabric board (cheap, can get in fabric shops) drawing what you see here on the cardboard fabric board as a pattern. The insulation pieces are from a 1972 January MFR date 240Z they didn't come from the car shown in my signature. Driver's firewall insulation: Passenger's firewall insulation: In car- driver and middle sections: In car- passenger side:

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

I want to make major upgrades to my Z

Can anyone help? I want to upgrade to 15/16/17 inch rims and tires, but do not want to do fenders or any other mods to my Z. I'm doing so to upgrade brakes all the way around. Not sure what will fit as well as what will be best for my ride? Any suggestions?

chefman1

chefman1

 

Throttle jerk fix

Hi all, This mod eliminates MOST of the throttle jerk but not ALL of it. I owned the car for 4 years before I noticed it still has a small amount of throttle jerk. The previous owner of my 240Z reduced throttle jerk from idle to take off by bending the upper arm of the "turnstyle" as seen in the attached pictures to a stair step shape effectively shortening it. This mod is no cost, possibly reversible and requires no welding, drilling or adding parts. The connecting rod with a nylon ball on both ends connecting between the turnstyle and the carb control shaft arm may not need adjusting or modifying as the new turnstyle connecting point for the nylon ball is both closer in one plane and further away in another which appear to cancel each other out. The PO for my car did this mod however the connecting rod on my car does not appear to have been modified. The first picture shows measurements of the bend in the upper turnstyle arm. The measurements on the ends of the arm are from the center of the pivot to the first bend and from the other end it is from the center of the nylon ball to the first bend from that end. This mod eases the throttle jerk by reducing "mechanical advantage". The carb butterfly opening is slower as the gas pedal is first depressed off idle compared to the stock arrangement. To the PO who did this throttle fix a tip of the hat and a moment of silence as I am aware he has passed on. Mike Measurements: Side view: Overhead view:

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

San Diego 5th ave Auto Showcase Oct 13 2013 Japanese class?

Is anyone planning to go to the 5th ave auto showcase in San Diego Oct 13? I spoke with an organizer Brandy and asked her if there is a Japanese class, or way to group some vintage Japanese cars. She told me that there are discounts available for any club or group if 18 cars minimum can be organized. They would reserve a part of the block just for up to 25 cars. Admittedly, I do not have Datsun Z etc. I have a 1967 Toyota Sports 800 here in the San Diego area. I would like to see a group like yours participating. Of course, I also would be interested parking with you, since there is no way toyotas would be able to muster many, or any Toyotas. I do have a friend that would display his Toyota 200GT with me to, which would be great to see along side of your cars. Here is the website info. If someone would organize 18 or more Japanese cars, it would be be a good thing. Fifth Ave Auto Showcase, Gaslamp, San Diego - 5th Ave Car Show. Classics, Luxury If not, I will sign up in the "special interest" class and hang out with kit cars and various other cars with no classification. thanks, Scott

jamul scott

jamul scott

 

1971 240z L24 engine with triple dcoe 40 webers leaking coolant

I have a 1971 240z that I have been restoring eight years the end of next month 8/13. I had a machine shop rebuild my engine which took the guy two plus years to do. I finally got it in the car and went with thriple Dcoe 40 triple carbs and the engine runs fine. I noticed a month or so after the engine was in the car that there was a small amount of coolant on the block where there are tabs on the block that stick out past the head. I pressurized the cooling system and dropped pressure so I pulled the head off took it to a different machine shop and had them pressure test and put a straight edge on the head and they told me it was good and I told them what happened and who did the motor. They told me the real hard jobs the sub out to the guy that did my engine. The guy that did my engine grew up in a machine shop that his dad owned and the guy is now around 50 and doing engines his entire adult life so he suposably knows what he is doing. I told him what was going on and he said I waited to long to start it and when I did I did not run it long enough. I don't remember his exact words but it's like the head gasket was a rear main seal or something. I alway thought the thing either leaks or does not and told the guy the thing was not a rear main seal or something that drys up. I then pulled the three webers, intake and what not then the head. The guy used a felpro gasket and it looked ok but I bought a new one and installed it, torqued the head to specs and started it again and it appeared fine but a week later I noticed a small amount of coolant along the edge of the block where it sticks out futher than the head. I checked the toque on the head bolts and they are to specs. I am getting pretty frustrated at this point I have spent almost 40k on the car so far and have had everything replaced with new and just when I think I can drive it the leak shows up. If the head was pressure tested and checked to insure it was straight and it still leaks it's got me stumped and a little mad. If anyone can give me some clue other than I waited to long to start the engine which is crap I would really appreciate it. Thanks, Jeff Roberts

robertsjeff

robertsjeff

 

1977 280z rpm tach gets stuck

Hello I have a 1977 280z and the RPM needle gets stuck from time to time. when I park the car and leave it off over night it will reset back to zero. This is my first post so I don't know if I am explaining myself correctly. I am looking for some guidance of what steps I should take first to check it without having to dismantle the dash. I know there has to be someone else that may have or had this problem. Thank you and I hope I am posting this correctly. Open to some feed back.

scruz32

scruz32

 

Please HELP! Wiring Diagram for 1983 280zx GL

Hey Y'all! This is my first post. Please forgive me if this has been asked and asked. I have been searching for the wiring diagram for the OEM radio in my '83 zx. I can find the one for the non-GL, but no luck finding the one for my car. I am replacing the 30 year old worn out unit with a new aftermarket system. I plan to cut the old harness and reconnect. Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks, BB

BigBird

BigBird

 

Cowl leaf screen

This mod is reversible leaving no trace. Using silicone rubber sealant I glued a piece of aluminum window screen I spray painted black onto the bottom of the cowl where the holes are to keep leaves and other debris out. The screen helps prevent corrosion from debris trapping moisture in the area where the windshield wiper motor is. Mike Looking at bottom of cowl, screen being glued on:

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

Working on suspension

I want to coilover my car, but scare to chop off original struts. So, I've looking for spare parts. Luckily, local Pick N' Pull has new inventory of same year of my Z. Before pick them up, I study how easy to remove suspension struts from the car. I learned removing spindle pins from strut is one of the hardest job... Friend suggest to get yellow tank of propane to heat up and hammering one the spindle to move back and force to loosen up before using spindle removable tool. My spindle pins are not rusted, and just hammering them, I could've remove both of them without too much work:D I guess I spent all of my luck for this year for this.

tamo3

tamo3

 

Making an inspection light lens

The inspection light is is NLA or very hard to find at the least, so I decided to try and make the lens. I had a light in good condition, but the lens was brittle and badly faded. Since I had all the equipment for making a set of tail light lenses for my 280Z it was not too much work to try make the inspection light lens. The Equipment I used: 1. Vacuum chamber and vacuum pump. This is needed to remove air from the silicone resin used for the mould and the clear resin used to make the lens. You can do it without using vacuum to de-gas, but the results are not as good. 2. Pressure chamber and compressor. The pressure chamber is used to pressurize the silicone mould when its curing and to pressurize the resin when you mould the lens. If you don't do this you run the risk of getting a champagne bubble effect. This effect is caused by small air bubbles captured in the resin during stirring. The silicone mould suffers a different problem. Uncompressed air bubbles in the mould will compress during the pressurizing phase of the lens making. When the bubbles are compressed the mould is then distorted and you get a strange looking lens. Trust me, I know from experience.:stupid: 3. Scale that can measure 1 gram for measuring resin, dye and hardener ratios. Very important for reproduction later. Note: If you are using dye, I suggest mixing the dye in the resin before adding dye. Mix enough for your total production and keep it stored. Mix the quantity needed with the hardener. This way you maintain the colour through out the production run. 4. Injection needle or device to evenly inject the resin without trapping bubbles in the mould. This is probably the hardest part of making the lens. I prefer to inject the resin instead of pouring it into the mould. I have found it easier to prevent bubbles this way. I fit a plastic tube to the seringe (plastic tube used for fish tank pumps) and make sure you use enough tube to hold the resin. 5. Releasing agent. Spray pack. This helps prevent the resin sticking to everything you can think of. Makes cleaning easy. Pressurize the mould. Once the mould is poured it needs to be pressurized to remove any small bubbles. I use 2Barg for 8 hours and warm the chamber to 60°C. This helps cure the lens and helps give it a shiny finish. Remove the mould, dismantle it and trim the excess of the lens.

EuroDat

EuroDat

 

Hood emergency release (plus handle mount stripped threads fix)

Hi all, This has been done before by others, the following is my experience. I added a second hood release cable so now I have two of them in case the original cable breaks. Getting the hood open after the cable breaks is not particularly easy in my view of how others have done this. The easiest way to do this IMO is to do what someone else did, loop a steel wire through where the original hood release cable attaches to the latch under the hood, run it through the firewall grommet for the speedo and make a loop in the end inside the car. I didn't do it that way as I wanted to use a spring sheath pull cable like the original with a knob on the end hidden above the existing hood release handle. Materials needed: A. 5 foot long pull cable from auto parts store, eBay etc B. Wire cutters if desired, to shorten "spring like" sheath and center steel wire. C. Needle nose pliers for wrapping steel center wire around hood pull point D. Clear packing tape used to slide new cable through hood release firewall grommet using existing cable as a pull tape. The new cable was pulled through the same firewall grommet the original hood release uses to make it look like it belongs there, painting it black would also help. An easy way to pull the new cable through the grommet is to use slippery clear packing tape to tape the new cable to the old one and then use the old one to pull the new one through the grommet. This has to be after the old one is unfastened from the hood latch connect point so it can be partially pulled back inside the car. Don't use duct tape! That stuff will never go through the grommet unless there is a big hole in it. I shortened the spring like cable sheath to be the same length as the existing cable so it would lie next to it all the way to the latch assembly to hide it. An idea to shorten the sheath would be to pull on the knob to pull the solid center wire out of the way before cutting the spring like sheath (NOW I think of it). I did this the hard way, I carefully used wire cutters while the center wire was still there. The easiest way is to skip this and let the extra cable loop in the engine compartment avoiding the carb linkage or anything else that moves. I clamped the new and old cables together 10" from the hood latch though it wasn't clear to me that a clamp was needed. I tried clamping them together at the hood latch and that didn't work; too much friction for the return spring. I made a clamp out of a small piece of sheet metal about 2"X1" that I clamped around the cable pulls with vice grips. Another idea might be to use a very small hose clamp with a rectangular piece of solid metal held between the two cables, otherwise the cables are too small for most hose clamps. The pull knob for the new cable is right above the handle for the original to keep it invisible until it might be needed. It has a spring holding it up out of sight and is zip tied to the original cable closer to the firewall to keep it from flopping around. I was driving with the hood ajar before adding a backup hood release but the new cable works great and I now get to drive with the hood closed. Inside car:________________________Spring to hold new knob up out of sight: Hood latch: ***** Fixing stripped threads on handle mount***** I may be the only one who has had this problem but, the threads the chrome colored nut under the pull handle screws onto on my car were stripped when I bought the car. This nut secures the handle pull to the frame of the car. The loose nut allowed the handle to flop around which I didn't like. The threads (10MM, pitch=1) were too far gone to be fixed by chasing them with a die. A new cable was going for $75 so to fix the loose handle I used two washers about 1 inch in diameter, one chrome and one ordinary steel both with large center holes in them. The chrome washer was used under the pull handle to improve appearance and is slightly larger than the steel washer, all hardware came from Thrifty (Ace) hardware. Two tiny pilot holes were drilled in the chrome washer in line with where two holes were going to be drilled in the steel washer with 3/4" self tapping screws. The steel washer was cut through on one side with a bench grinder (could use a hacksaw) to allow the washer to fit over the cable behind the handle mount. Further enlargement of this cut was done with an ordinary file. The drilled holes in the chrome washer were made a little larger than the self tapping screws I used to drill into the steel washer to allow alignment. Note that the screws have to clear the flange on the back of the cable mount; mine didn't entirely clear the flange so to fix this I used a file to grind off the side of the flange to get it out of the way. The steel washer was placed behind the handle mount, the chrome put in front and the self tapping screws securely hold the two together. Although this violates a prime directive of not drilling holes in the car they are only visible with the door open. Also, the drilled part can be easily replaced as it is attached to the car with two screws. The handle is very secure now. Front exploded view:_________________Side view showing stripped threads: Back view: Picture of install:

Mikes Z car

Mikes Z car

 

Removing heavy bumper

Wanted to get reproduction Japanese Fairlady Z Gille Mesh, I remove front bumper to see the capability. Also plan to mount 240z bumper. After removing bumper, the front height is raised a lot. It's more complicated to remove valence compare with 240z. 280z got extra metal plate for bumper mounting position that prevent direct mount for 240z bumper. I thought Datsun Spirits blog used to have photo of the metal plate removal, but he deleted blog post. So don't know how much metal I should remove from frame....

tamo3

tamo3

 

Engine is running, no clutch, no brake...

After pumping fuel, engine is running, Yeah! But, Clutch, Brake is not working. Remove Clutch master and Brake Master & booster for rebuild. Strip paint of BMC and sand down the rust. Prime & paint it. Using '83 280zx Brake Master Rebuild kit from Black Dragon, just use piston only to rebuild BMC. Mount the rebuild clutch and Booster.

tamo3

tamo3

 

SR20 Swap questions/help

Hello Datsun Nation! I’m new to this forum, and i have a couple of questions in mind. I have been wanting to buy a 240z, 260z, or 280z for the past few years, and now that I have saved a little bit of money; i am ready to start looking for one. I have seen quite a few Z's with SR20s and LS1s swaps, which has only persuaded me to do the same. However, i would love to get your guys opinion an expertise of installing an SR20. I would love to have an LS1, but quite frankly, i think it would be too much $. Furthermore, since i am not a mechanic, i will most like need to have a professional mechanic install the motor. With that said, i have an idea of how much an SR20 costs, but how much will it cost me to have it installed? Of course, this swap is not going to come immediately after my purchase, but i would eventually love to have a Z with an SR20. I look forward to reading everybody’s suggestions, opinions, and experiences when it comes to swapping/upgrading a motor in a Z, especially those who currently have an SR20 on their Z.

blindsquad

blindsquad

 

What do you do after 10 years hybernation?

After 10 years hibernation, I started basic staff. My goal is to run engine at first. Engine oil & filter change (5 qt for $15.99) Antifreeze coolant change (10 qt for $14) I bought cheapest oil since this is just testing purpose. I learned that Pepboy mobile coupon is really handy and beat the price from any other auto parts shop. off course, gasoline change. Drain 10 years old gas... It looks like... pee After replace fluid, start working on electric items. Change Battery ($100) Unplug #1 spark plug and turn ignition to see... not sparkling. Remove distributor cap to check the condition. It looks good. I decided to change spark plug-wire(NGK RC-NE61) and MSD Blaster 2 coil. Spark plug on the top of valve cover is flashing Next to check whether fuel is coming or not.

tamo3

tamo3

 

Im Stuck between a rock and a hard place!!!!!

I decide to drive my 280z over 220 something miles(Panama city to Jacksonville FL). I wrongly assumed my car had oil and was ready to go. After 2 hours on the road, I noticed as i drove up steep roads my speed would go down. Then i notice i couldn't get past 70 going down. Then i was below the minimum speed limit which was 50. Lucky for me it was 9 or 10 at night. Then my car started to shutter. I pulled over and checked the fuel pump...... No leaks. The engine looks good. My first thought was overheating. So i sat on the highway for about 30 minutes. With temps in the 40's that sounded long enough. So i start it up, its normal so i drive and it shutters slightly. 4th gear is slow as dirt so i stick to 3rd. In 3rd gear i top out at 50 up and down hills. Then my car goes nuts it starts to backfire with the slightest pressure on the gas. So i get off the interstate under and quiet overpass. I see that the rear axle is slightly wet. Yet is see no fuel leaks. I look at the front and the oil pan looks like i drove through a puddle. I check the oil, there is none. My car now sounds like a tractor and shakes like Muhammad Ali's parkinson's. So i get it to a hotel parking lot and it can barely move. I put in 4 quarts of fluid but it wont even rev and it backfires. My dad first thought i threw a rod but he now thinks its a head gasket. Around the cover is oil and my oil looks like coca cola all over my block. I'm mechanically incline with aircraft since i work for the United States Air Force but this Japanese straight 6 looks like a nuclear physics equation. Does anyone have suggestions on how to fix this and get it road worthy to drive at least close to normal. This is my first vacation and right now its been ruined by my neglect and ignorance. Someone Please Help!!!!!

Bryson@80z

Bryson@80z

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