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What is your most valuable 'made-it-myself' tool?


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Really?  Are we out of contributions already?  I think that the old Atlantic Z-Car site could deliver at least a dozen ideas all on its own.  CO should be able match that. ZKars and Grannyknot, too.

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I mentioned this a few weeks ago. I don't keep the components in my toolbox. To remove a pilot bushing, a slice of bread and a bolt slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the pilot bushing in the flywheel. A hammer and the bolt take the place of a grease gun and the bread acts like grease without the squeeze out.

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The reason I haven’t chimed in with my “favorite” is there are just too many to choose from. They are all my children, I don’t dare declare any particular one my favorite without risking the wrath of the others.

I should lay them all out on the floor and take a group photo.

At least I’ll try to contribute more to the thread I started called “Cool Tool of the Day”. One a week on Sundays perhaps.

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22 minutes ago, Mark Maras said:

I mentioned this a few weeks ago. I don't keep the components in my toolbox. To remove a pilot bushing, a slice of bread and a bolt slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the pilot bushing in the flywheel. A hammer and the bolt take the place of a grease gun and the bread acts like grease without the squeeze out.

Doesn’t the pilot bushing go in the crankshaft hub?

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2 hours ago, zKars said:

The reason I haven’t chimed in with my “favorite” is there are just too many to choose from. They are all my children, I don’t dare declare any particular one my favorite without risking the wrath of the others.

I should lay them all out on the floor and take a group photo.

At least I’ll try to contribute more to the thread I started called “Cool Tool of the Day”. One a week on Sundays perhaps.

There is no such thing as the best tool.  If I need to pound a nail in, a micrometer does me no good, yet for precision measuring, the hammer is just as useless.  Whenever I work on anything house or vehicle related, I tend to need every tool I own.  If I don't own the perfect tool for a job, I either make one, or I improvise and use what I have in the toolbox already.  If I have the time or think I'll ever need to do the same job again, I'll usually make a tool or jig.

 

Edited by Jeff G 78
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3 hours ago, Racer X said:

Doesn’t the pilot bushing go in the crankshaft hub?

 Yes it does. Not enough coffee to fully engage my memory that early.

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1 hour ago, Jeff G 78 said:

There is no such thing as the best tool.  If I need to pound a nail in, a micrometer does me no good, yet for precision measuring, the hammer is just as useless.  Whenever I work on anything house or vehicle related, I tend to need every tool I own.  If I don't own the perfect tool for a job, I either make one, or I improvise and use what I have in the toolbox already.  If I have the time or think I'll ever need to do the same job again, I'll usually make a tool or jig.

 

You "can" pound a nail with a micrometer! Would you want to ...............................................????????????????

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OK, I have to ask... What is the purpose of a bolt stretch gauge? Please don't say to measure the stretch of a bolt. A little background please on this cool-looking tool.

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2 hours ago, Jeff Berk said:

OK, I have to ask... What is the purpose of a bolt stretch gauge? Please don't say to measure the stretch of a bolt. A little background please on this cool-looking tool.

Torque to yield bolts require that how much the fastener stretches is known. Once the bolt reaches the maximum allowable stretch, it must be discarded and replaced. 
 

So yes, you are measuring how much the bolt stretches.

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Part of the reason for owning a Z and subscribing to this site is to learn something now and then. Fel-Pro does a good job of explaining the concept and included an example for a Subaru where the head bolts had to be tightened in two steps, loosened in two steps, and then tightened in two to three steps in order to get to the "yield zone". 

https://www.felpro.com/technical/tecblogs/proper-installation-use-t-t-y-bolts.html

 

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3 hours ago, Jeff Berk said:

a Subaru where the head bolts had to be tightened in two steps, loosened in two steps, and then tightened in two to three steps in order to get to the "yield zone". 

I've owned a lot Subies and have done that head bolt job a few times, real pain in the butt.

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This has nothing to do with Zs but Stihl equipment. They've gone to a new carb tool they won't sale you, bat rastards, for adjusting the high and low settings.

After a month of trying to save a dollar I found what works at Harbor Freight. It's a screwdriver set with a 4mm tool you need all the rest are just a bonus in my thinking and I must offset everything with a positive spin. Wacko I know, I get that every other day.

https://www.harborfreight.com/16-piece-precision-screwdriver-set-4143.html

Precision Screwdriver Set, 16 Pc. 4143 alternate photo #1

 

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I have exactly the same issue with an approach slope to my garage... although the frequency of my new-project arrivals pales in comparison with GK's.  I bought a hand-crank winch and bolted it to my workbench (which is bolted to the back wall of my garage).  Motorized would have been better, but it was certainly an improvement over a come-along

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I also mounted a winch. In my case, I sometimes need to pull my car in and onto my 4-post lift. Pushing it up the lift ramps was too difficult so I attached a box hitch receiver at the other end of the lift. I have a small 12v winch that is welded to a hitch adapter. The winch can then be attached to the lift to pull my Z onto the lift. The winch can also attach to my Chevy Volt or my garden tractor with their box hitch receiver and run off their battery.

I thought I was so original with my idea. I guess not.

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What do they say about like-minds?

I also mounted a hand-cranked winch to my 4-poster lift. However, most of the time I run the winch with a battery powered drill with a 3/8" drive 3/4" socket chucked up. The drill works great until I have to "go over the hump".

Edited by crayZlair
added more for clarity
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