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Barefootdan's 280z Build


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Crank had to be cut way back in time to clear wear-related damage, so now I can't use stock bearings.  I would think that by now in the life of these motors, most cranks would have needed to be cut, but maybe not.

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I can get a "matched set" from King Bearings, but they are all aluminum, and the mains aren't available until Oct.  It seems King has gone the way of Clevite, foregoing tri-metal.

Taiho is available now (sort of) as long as shipping from AU works.  Delivery estimate is any day up to mid Sep.

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Look at the Mahle website.  Most P-series bearings have been superceded by their A-series. 

https://web.tecalliance.net/mahle-catalog/qa/parts/autocare/assigned?targetId=6642&parentAssemblyGroupId=10&assemblyGroupId=136&page=0#@brc/autocareassem:1983%20Nissan%20280ZX;targetId:6642/autocarelnkparts:Cylinder%20Block%20Components;targetId:6642;parentAssemblyGroupId:10;assemblyGroupId:136;page:0

Of course, some are still available, but in my search they were only standard sizes and larger oversizes - nothing at the .25mm size.

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Posted (edited)

Finally got some new photos! The painting of the engine bay went smooth. It’s nothing permanent, but at least it will all be one color now 🙂

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Edited by Barefootdan
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Thanks to @Zed Head for the idea of just cleaning up the body work for the time being. I spent the past couple days getting all the surface rust off the car. I originally thought that the paint faded to the ugly brown, but there was a nice surprise hiding underneath!

I started off using a scotch pad and water. Then stepped up to some light CLR mix for the rust spots:
IMG-2750.jpg

 

As I went through, my process changed and I didnt like the look of the bare metal (where the CLR took off the rust). So I went back to just water and scotch pad. I had to remind myself that we arent preparing for paint, and just trying to clean up the surface! 🙂 I didnt like how rough the surface felt still after, so I hit it with some fine steel wool to smooth things up a bit.

IMG-2751.jpg

This was taken right after a wipe down so it is still moist in some areas and streaky in others. But the difference was amazing. 

Here are a few more comparisons:

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From there I went and grabbed some Penetrol to "seal" the paint temporarily. It gives a satin/gloss finish that also makes the colors and rust *Patina* some extra vibrance. 

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Just a reference of where we started:

 IMG-2771.jpg

IMG-2766.jpgHood.jpg

The streaks on the hood leveled out, I just took the photo too soon 🙂 

 

She absolutely deserves better body work in the future, but this will at least give me a finish that I can wipe down without my microfiber snagging immediately! 😄 

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Wow, that’s a big difference! That faded red makes it look like it’s covered in rust in the before pic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Ordered up the last (I think) of the parts I need for the build. Got some bearings (both main and rod), rings, belt, coolant hoses, ring compressor and installer, some assembly lube, clutch kit, alternator, output shaft seal, and engine/tranny mounts. 
 

last thing I need to get moving on is dropping off the flywheel to get resurfaced. Unless someone has experience with lightweight flywheels and highly recommends it, I’ll probably stick with the stock one for costs. 
 

The fun part is just around the corner. Can’t wait to start. 

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You could ask the machinest how much to take some weight off the OE flywheel. The aluminum ones are expensive so a lot of folks lighten the stock one.

Use that assembly lube, mine looked like fake blood but I can't remember the name right off. That really helps the bearings while you rotate the crank putting the pistons in.

Sounds like you've covered all your bases and should be a walk in the park. Take your time though, I get excited and go too fast and end up making mistakes. Have fun!

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Posted (edited)

New clutch came in but looks a bit different than what I pulled out. It is missing the extended key slot. Is this okay or do I need to swap it out? I also attached photos of the flywheel to see what people think. Resurface or can I get by with a scuff and clean? Reading the Tom Monroe manual says if all looks good, just clean and scuff! 
 

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Edited by Barefootdan
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4 minutes ago, ETI4K said:

If it were me, have it ground. Those hot spots look to be enough to cause premature failure.  I've learned the hard way.

Thanks! First time doing any clutch work so was unsure on what to look for. It’s fairly cheap insurance to do it now while it’s already out. 

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I don't think that grinding will remove heat checking, it's usually deep.  But it might produce a flatter surface.

What Monroe was saying, I think, is if looks good AFTER scuffing/sanding/smoothing then it's good to go.   I've done it and it worked fine.  You can put a piece of sandpaper on a flat hard block and sand the surface.  You'll probably be able to tell if the surface produced is flat and consistent when you're done.

Fun to do even if you decide to have it ground anyway. 

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3 hours ago, Barefootdan said:

It is missing the extended key slot. Is this okay or do I need to swap it out?

I think you're talking about the splined hub.  That's just a design feature of the disc.  No parts to swap there.  You do want to clean the splines on your transmission shaft though and test fit the disc to make sure it slides smoothly on the shaft.  It doesn't move far but it does need to be free.  Use a wire brush.

Check the nose/snout of the transmission front cover also for grooves and wear.  The throwout bearing sleeve rides on it and needs a smooth path too.  If anybody let a bearing seize up in the past the spinning sleeve can do damage.  Some time's the snout/nose breaks off completely.

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1 minute ago, Zed Head said:

I think you're talking about the splined hub.  That's just a design feature of the disc.  No parts to swap there.  You do want to clean the splines on your transmission shaft though and test fit the disc to make sure it slides smoothly on the shaft.  It doesn't move far but it does need to be free.  Use a wire brush.

Check the nose/snout of the transmission front cover also for grooves and wear.  The throwout bearing sleeve rides on it and needs a smooth path too.  If anybody let a bearing seize up in the past the spinning sleeve can do damage.  Some time's the snout/nose breaks off completely.

That’s exactly what I was referring too! Awesome to hear it’s good to go. Thanks for the tip about the front cover, I’ll be sure to take a look. 

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27 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

I don't think that grinding will remove heat checking, it's usually deep.  But it might produce a flatter surface.

Yep, the hot spots are hard to cut on a lathe.  The cutting tool has to dig in hard to cut the hardened areas and then readily cuts into the softer areas.  Grinding takes it all down evenly in a very controlled manner.  A clutch disc will never conform to the distorted surface of a flywheel and pressure plate with those raised hot spots,  so the disc will rapidly wear until its new shape conforms to the pressure plate and flywheel.  Not worth it in my mind to skip the flywheel flattening process

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2 minutes ago, ETI4K said:

those raised hot spots

This is the question that sanding will answer.  Sand it, look at it, make a decision.

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6 hours ago, Zed Head said:

This is the question that sanding will answer.  Sand it, look at it, make a decision.

I would absolutely try sanding it. Always in favor of a $5 solution that works.

Not sure why I wrote that last post to sound like not to - probably foggy headed and way past my bedtime.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Another update for the Z! 
Flywheel was dropped at the machine shop. He gave a cheap price since the block is still there and taking a bit longer to do. I figured why not...

Ordered up some more parts! Who doesn't love daily stops from the FedEx driver....well maybe my fiancé...I should look into batching my deliveries into one day so it looks like I am buying less 😉 

We now have (or on its way) MSA 3-2 headers, Z-Story JDM muffler, ARP head stud kit, Shifter bushings, clutch slave, lots of engine paint and misc. hoses, as well as some probably controversial items. I grabbed a "cold air intake" as my stock airbox is looking rough, $40 for a filter and piping is worth it for now. Electric fan setup, I know I see so many posts about these but my car didn't come with the fan, the fan clutch, or a full shroud. Also I picked up an ignition panel...more on that later. 

I was able to do a TON of cleaning lately while waiting on the block to finish. Lots of scrubbing and degreaser for the engine accessories. Valve cover and oil pan are painted up and looking fresh. I'll be sure to grab some photos. Also, I have been dreading cleaning up the fuel tank lines. When I first installed the tank, I was in a hurry to get the car running so nothing was secured or cut to length correctly. I finally redid the lines and tidied it up. For the large vent lines, I was able to use a trick I found here with 90 degree fittings for tight bends. Worked like a charm. 

And so that brings us to where I am now. I find myself with time, but nothing else to tackle until the block is done. I could start interior work, but I know that is going to be a massive project in itself. So of course I browse some more threads here and came across one for a harness rebuild...oh no. I did take the time back when I first pulled the engine to wrap the harness and clean it. But my god, the previous owners paint job has 90% of my connectors red and 90% of those are now cracked from removal (the price to pay for little rust!) It is just an eye sore and since everything is out of the interior...hell lets see if this is something I can do. 

I debated back and forth about an OEM style reproduction harness. I could just pull mine, and make a 1:1 copy. But, there are quite a few items I don't want/need anymore and I'd like to use modern relays/connectors whenever possible. Not only will this save some money, but probably a lot of headache! So it will be a modified harness, simplified for modern tech. It will be nice to have all the relays in one spot for once! Hopefully there are at least a few folks who will find this useful information. I will be designing a fresh wiring diagram that is colored and interactive if anyone would like a copy. I am picking and choosing strange items to keep or remove. Such as removing fusible links, that's an easy one. But I am thinking about keeping the Shunt for my ammeter. I don't want the door buzzers, the seat belt lights, emissions equipment, just to name a few more examples. My ignition switch works fine, although I am debating using an ignition panel to allow each accessory to be on its own toggle (fuel, ign, fans, etc.). When I first started up my car, lights worked, but not signals, so I will try to fix my connections now before resorting to having everything on a toggle. I like to have a balance of oem and aftermarket, I don't want a full on race car spec interior. If I do go down the route of toggle ignition, I am looking into hiding a kill switch, or going modern with an RFID sensor...kind of like a smart key.

This also leads into EFI. I would like to go with a megasquirt system, maybe microsquirt, to handle that side of the harness. It'd be nice to remove the AFM and dizzy for modern solutions. Again, this will also let me run larger cams, remove unused wiring, and clean up the bay even more. This will all happen after the engine is back in the car and running. I don't want to try to tackle a fresh rebuild with also a fresh harness!

Anyways, This is giving me something to design on the computer so I don't go crazy 🙂 below is a snippet of a proof of concept. These are absolutely not done and I mainly was playing around with EasyEDA to learn what capabilities it has. Shoutout to @SteveJ for helping me get started.

image.png

Edited by Barefootdan
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I wrapped up the body harness first draft today. I have a few questions from the 1975 wiring diagram. Some odd choices it seems, or maybe just artifacts from the scan?

1. The backup lamp switch for the M/T looks to have two wires, both blue, one to the rear lights and the other to the wiper. Is this just sourcing power? I assume I can grab 12v anywhere close then.

2. Yellow switch wire from the starter goes directly to the interlock relay. Can I bypass this entirely and route it directly to my start switch on my ignition panel?

3. The second wire down in the ignition coil resistor is a black/blue that looks to get power from the stalk on the start sequence. Can this power also be jumped from my start switch on my ignition panel?

4. There are black/white wires from the C4 and C5 connector that jump between each other before the firewall...and after...is there a specific reason?

5. The glove box lamp ground and speedometer ground look to connect directly to each other. I think this is a scanning issue in the document, but just curious 🙂 

6. The black wire from the fuel pump goes through the rear harness and into the radio White/Black wire. Does it get ground here? Can I just ground at the chassis in the back?

 

Thanks all!

 

 

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As you may have figured out, there are some anomalies in the wiring diagrams. Some of them can be resolved with the proper application of a multimeter. For instance, I would expect that the blue/red wire for the reverse switch actually ties into the blue/red wire coming off of the fuse box. That could also be going to the wiper.

I'm not sure the interlock relay made it into the 75. It depends upon when Nissan was able to react to the change in the requirement for that monstrosity.

The other questions would take studying the wiring diagram in detail. I hope you won't be offended if I say that working on my own projects has a higher priority (as does getting some sleep). The challenge for me is that I don't have a 75 that I can confirm your findings with. 

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