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Captain Obvious

Stainless Rear Plate Between Engine and Transmission

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Any weight difference between the new and the old? Just curious.

Edited by crayZlair
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9 hours ago, crayZlair said:

Any weight difference between the new and the old? Just curious.

Hmmm. As simple as the question seems, I'm not sure what you're asking.

Are you asking "Is there a weight difference between my new stainless piece and the old triangular holed carbon steel piece? If so, then (ignoring miniscule differences in density between stainless steel and carbon steel) the answer is "No, they are the same."

But if you are asking "Is there a weight difference between my new stainless piece and the older 240 version with the round hole?", then the answer is "Yes, mine is lighter because the hole is larger."

Here's a pic of a rusted up older 240 design with the round hole in the middle:
P1170807.JPG

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5 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

Hmmm. As simple as the question seems, I'm not sure what you're asking.

Are you asking "Is there a weight difference between my new stainless piece and the old triangular holed carbon steel piece? If so, then (ignoring miniscule differences in density between stainless steel and carbon steel) the answer is "No, they are the same."

 

 

Assuming that the steel is the same gauge (thickness).............................

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At that level of detail, my stainless plate is (nominally) four thousandths  (.004 in) thinner than the plated original. So I guess it's a performance increase too. Not sure how much weight difference that would result in, however.  LOL 

  • Haha 1

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Nice work Captain. 

Way back in 1989, I made one out of aluminium for the race Z. I did it as part of the diet to get the overall weight of the car down. Don't recall the actual weight savings, but it added to the roughly 200 pounds I took off the car.

Since I was running a stock class, I painted it black and never fessed up to until now.  🤫😅😅😅😅

 

 

 

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Now make one that has material only where the thickness of the  lip of the transmission touches the engine block, around the perimeter, and of course the area around the starter and under the block where it “sticks out”. All the rest of the material is doing nothing.

You could even punch the lower area below the block full of small holes and claim that the air circulation created with the spinning fly wheel helps with engine cooling. Especially when water gets in there from the road and gets splashed around inside the clutch area. Ok, maybe that’s not a great idea.....

Other than that, cool! 

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1 hour ago, zKars said:

Now make one that has material only where the thickness of the  lip of the transmission touches the engine block, around the perimeter, and of course the area around the starter and under the block where it “sticks out”. All the rest of the material is doing nothing.

You could even punch the lower area below the block full of small holes and claim that the air circulation created with the spinning fly wheel helps with engine cooling. Especially when water gets in there from the road and gets splashed around inside the clutch area. Ok, maybe that’s not a great idea.....

Other than that, cool! 

Well I did make the triangular opening larger, moving out to the limits of the block/bell housing mating surfaces, but left the outside looking stock.

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11 hours ago, zKars said:

 All the rest of the material is doing nothing.

LOL. All the rest of that material keeps squirrels out of your bell housing. Haha!!

Racer X, I bet everyone at every level of racing bends some rules and stresses others beyond the limits of bending.  LOL  Your secret is safe with us. All 30,000 of us.  Haha!

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The plating did'nt fail on my 280zx plate.. It's the same plate for 280z - 280zx then..

20140716_164147.jpg

 

As it's a daily driver this was good enough for mine.. (If i had preped it a bit (sanded) it would have come out perfect.

20140716_164154.jpg

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On 10/30/2020 at 6:31 AM, Captain Obvious said:

Any interest in having more of these made and offering for sale?

Since you have the file you could modify it to make starter plates, for use on engines that don't have a transmission.  I think that people have reported that the original plate is strong enough, bolted on alone, but bumping the thickness up might be good (edit - then you could thread the holes for the starter bolts instead of having to use a bolt and nut.).  I made one from 3/16" steel a while ago.  It was handy for spinning the engine on a Harbor Freight dolly, fogging for storage, checking oil flow, etc.  Otherwise you have to have a transmission to bolt the starter to.

Also I wonder about making it a two piece so that a person can have access to the inside of the bellhousing and front of the flywheel.  Checking seals, and clutch fork operation, ring gear quality, and stuff like that. 

Edited by Zed Head

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2 hours ago, Zed Head said:

 

Also I wonder about making it a two piece so that a person can have access to the inside of the bellhousing and front of the flywheel.  Checking seals, and clutch fork operation, ring gear quality, and stuff like that. 

You won't get access to much more than the front of the flywheel.

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A mirror, a bright light, and a gap is all that's needed.  Better than squeezing your eyeballs in to a spot to see through the fork boot hole.

Edited by Zed Head

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10 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

A mirror, a bright light, and a gap is all that's needed.  Better than squeezing your eyeballs in to a spot to see through the fork boot hole.

There is only a small gap between the ring gear and the bell housing, not enough to get a mirror through, then the clutch cover behind that. The clutch fork opening gives more access, but is still not really useful.

The starter opening gives the best opportunity, two bolts, a nut and a plug. Pull it out and reach a small mirror in, have a look.

Edited by Racer X

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I'd rather work through the cover.  It's just an idea, no need to spend so much effort shooting it down.

If you have one, take a picture and show how much room isn't there.  I'd think the only people who really know what it looks like are those who've forgotten to put the plate on.

If you have the parts, a picture will make the case.

Edited by Zed Head

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