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Restoration of BringaTrailer 240z - HLS30-35883


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3 hours ago, ETI4K said:

That is a serious list.  What do the yellow cells indicate?

Attention grabbing for me for my restoration.  Some number of fasteners is missing - I need to find and add.   I will clean it up a bit as I progress on it. 🙂

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

The work to prep the hardware for plating is laborious.  Also, I have been trying to make sure I track down every last piece of hardware.  The car was not fully assembled when I bought it, so trying to identify everything is difficult and time consuming.  I am having some repeatable success with my hardware prepping process.  Basically it involves bead blasting to strip, stainless media in the vibratory tumbler to remove the glass bead finish, and corn cobb metal with a metal polish in the vibratory tumbler to polish the parts followed by a Dremel tool with wire brush attachments and sometimes #0000 stainless steel wool to make the finish more consistent after the dremel wire wheels.  

I got a wire wheel attachment for my 8" bench grinder and gave that a shot for a few seconds.  In addition to scaring me because I think it will take a body part off, it is way too aggressive for cleaning hardware.  Oh well, only about $15 and will certainly come in handy for something.

I thought I would share what I found out about the water pipe that goes around the back of the cylinder head.  First, I bought the one that Motorsport sells.  As you can see in the picture here, where I compare it to my original, it is quite different.  The bracket is much taller.  So the pipe is different to match.  It would probably work, but I had an idea to fix my old one.  

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Basically, the old pipe is in good condition except for the part where the hoses attached.  Under the hose, the pipe corroded quite severely.  Figuring that some modern Nissan would share a similar part, I went looking using image search on Google and came across a part that is not too expensive (about $25) that has what I need - good ends.  It is a Nissan/INFINITI 14053-EA20B Engine Coolant Pipe (pictured on the right in the third pic here):

IMG_20210627_123504.jpg  IMG_20210627_123534.jpg  IMG_20210627_123556.jpg

It is the same diameter and has enough straight length for me to rob what I need off of it.  I cut 25 mm off of each end and off of my old one.  Then I decided to break in my Tig welder, which I bought 1 and half years ago - 😦.  I know... right!  Well, I finally overcame the trepidation of the learning curve and got it fired up.  I practiced on the carcass of the new pipe for a bit and then managed to get two tack welds to hold one of the new ends on.  

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I will practice some more on the sacrificed pipe before I finish weld the new ends onto my old one.  I will test it for leaks of course.  I think it will look really nice when I am done and have it prepped to be re-plated.  

Edited by inline6
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  • 5 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Prepping hardware... Will it ever end???????????  🙂

Only a vague idea if this is good enough.  Perhaps, some of it is overkill.  Thanks for the guidance about prep level on the hardware.  I have probably been going overkill on some.  I hope I can finally send everything off in a couple of weeks.  A lot of the larger stuff (wiper linkage, hard lines, etc.) is not shown here:

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Edited by inline6
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Patcon said:

So what is a synopsis of your technique?

It has evolved some, and now it consists of:

  1. Using these glass beads from Northern Tool and Equipment, important for size of grain, and bead blasting at 90 psi with a 1/8th inch nozzle to remove all rust, and to establish a consistent finish.  I use one of these baskets and find that putting a variety of hardware (big and small) is great for trapping the parts in place so I can blast them without them flying around too much.  For large parts, you don't need to use the basket, and you can then go back over them with the pressure at 50 psi to put a smoother, easier to "second stage prep" by hand, finish. 
  2. For all hardware (bolts, washers, nuts, screws and odd small bits), I go straight from glass bead blasting to tumbling in one of these vibratory tumblers.  I now use a stainless steel media (bought from Southern Shine Tumblers on Facebook).  See pic below.  It consists of tiny little bits of stainless steel that are good at getting into tight spaces, like between threads, phillips head recesses, etc.  And now I use it dry.  I was using water and a bit of citric acid, but I think that is best for doing brass shell casings.  I was fighting keeping the parts from starting to oxidize/rust, and have found that the media works better and faster dry... to put a nice finish on the hardware.  Time in the tumbler is about 2-3 hours.
  3. For large parts that I can't tumble, I use a Dremel tool and the little wire wheel brush attachments after glass bead blasting.  For final, more consistent finish, I follow wire brushing by hand rub the large parts with #0000 fine steel wool.  Doesn't take a lot of work by hand, but the combination of using the Dremel followed by fine steel wool by hand does end up taking some time.

FB_IMG_1610218603112.jpg

 

The glass bead finish can be altered on aluminum parts, by the way.  It can look really nice, if after going over it once with 90 psi, you lower the pressure and go over the part slowly.  Extending the distance from the gun tip to the part also smooths out the finish, giving it a nice satin look.  I am still experimenting, with some aluminum parts, but a once over with 90 psi to clean followed by a once over with 50 psi achieves a really nice finish.

Edited by inline6
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I have the blasting cabinet, although it can be tremendously slow.

I have the same blasting basket

And I have a similar tumbler

Just need to figure out how to get the SS media

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7 minutes ago, Patcon said:

Just need to figure out how to get the SS media

Did you see the link to their facebook page?  Send an email to them first to inquire on pricing and availability:  southernshinemedia1@gmail.com  They accept PayPal.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

One of my goals for the car I am restoring is to address points of entry for water into the body of the car.  If you look at the design that was originally used for the emblems on the car, (hatch panel and quarter panel in particular), it is obvious that water enters through the holes in the panel.  I've been thinking of a way to seal them.  These may be a good option.  I am thinking of continuing to use the factory metal clips on the posts of the emblems, but to put these on and heat shrink them around the clips.  I think I will give it a try on a test panel.  I need to come up with a few other things for my order with McMaster-Carr.  

image.png

Edited by inline6
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4 minutes ago, Patcon said:

If I was worried about water entry at the emblems I would use some emblem adhesive or urethane sealant

Instead of the tubular clips?  Hmmm.  Or maybe just make a gasket of it around the posts and still use the tubular clips.  I've blobbed on clear silicon before and crossed my fingers that it sealed.  It makes a bit of a mess.  I am looking for something I can be more sure of getting a waterproof seal.

Are you thinking this?

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b40069443/

Or maybe this?

image.png

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Liquids seal is better

3m urethane or 3m weatherstrip adhesive

Some of this is obsessive. I doubt your car will ever see enough rain to be an issue. Even parked outside all of these cars are 50 years old and rust at the emblems is not the issue.

No offense intended...

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13 minutes ago, Patcon said:

Liquids seal is better

3m urethane or 3m weatherstrip adhesive

Some of this is obsessive. I doubt your car will ever see enough rain to be an issue. Even parked outside all of these cars are 50 years old and rust at the emblems is not the issue.

No offense intended...

Ha!  Some of it is obsessive - no doubt.  I appreciate your input. 

My first car was a 4-door 510.  Being just 16, it was a prized possession, and I used to wash it about every week.  Water got into that car and under the floor mats something fierce.  One day, to trace the sources of the leaks, I set up a hose so that water showered down heavily on the car.  After about 20 minutes, I got inside and looked to see how water was getting in (I had removed the kick panels and floor mats, etc.).  I was quite surprised to see that a main point of ingress was one of the bolts clamping the LF door hinge to the car.  A steady stream of water was wicking along the bolt threads from outside to inside the car and running downward from there, collecting into a pool on the floor.  Interestingly, though I thought the windshield seal might be leaking, it was not.  I also recall finding that if I pointed a spray of water from the hose at the c-pillar vents, water would fly in... it would get directed upwards by the internal part of the vent, and then drop down onto the trunk floor, where gravity would direct it to the lowest area under the rear seat bottom.  

When I restored my first 240z in 1993, I had to reconstruct the dog leg areas of the car with new metal.  A few weeks after I got the car painted I was shocked, and upset to find standing water in the dog legs of that car.  I couldn't figure out how it was getting in and just drilled a hole in the bottom of the dog leg area so the water that was  collecting there would drain out.

For this car, I'd like to know that when I wash it, or if I get caught in a thunderstorm with it, no water will enter through the emblem holes and dribble down into the dog legs, or down into the back edge of the rear hatch.  Newer cars tend to utilize water proof solutions like this BMW clip, which utilizes a rubber plug, of sorts:

image.png

 

Given my previous experiences, I figure I might as well address these known water entry points.

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I took a break from working on parts/hardware prep this weekend and worked on a few other projects.  My plan is to finish up with that prep and send everything off for plating in a week or two.  When I get everything back, I have some sheet metal that needs to be bolted to the car a final time before commencing on the last round of priming and blocking.  Some areas of panels "move" significantly when they are bolted in place.  This is true of the fenders, and especially the cowl panel... which brings me to a cool little project I did this weekend. 

From the factory, Nissan installed some closed cell foam under the flat corner areas of the cowl panel of my car.  It wasn't there on very early cars, but was a production change.  This foam sheet is sandwiched between the unibody and the cowl panel eliminating an "air gap" which can cause the panel to vibrate.   

I am quite pleased to say that I have found replacement foam that I honestly can't tell apart from the original, other than it is new of course!  It looks the same, feels the same, and has the same density (to the best I can feel). I made up some replacement pieces today: 

Old for first pic... then old on top of the new sheet for the second pic... and pic showing thickness of old stacked on new:

 IMG_20210815_165016.jpg  IMG_20210815_165223.jpg  IMG_20210815_165055.jpg

It's great when something goes so well.  I made some extras.  If anyone is interested in a set, let me know.  Be aware that if you've done final body work or paint on your cowl panel without your foam pads, installation of these will likely move your panel somewhat.  Best to utilize them during final bodywork prep.  

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When I get the hardware back from being re-plated, I will be able to bolt on the cowl panel with these new foam supports which will positively locate the flat areas of the panel so that I can proceed with the final sanding required to get it prepared for paint.  

Edited by inline6
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3 hours ago, inline6 said:

I am quite please to say that I have found replacement foam

I guess your cowl was rust free but that foam was the cause of thousands of rusted out cowls, water got trapped between the cowl and the foam and it couldn't evaporate.  I put 3 little blobs of RTV where the foam used to be so the cowl is still supported but there's no place for water to hide.

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Posted (edited)
On 8/15/2021 at 10:02 PM, grannyknot said:

I guess your cowl was rust free but that foam was the cause of thousands of rusted out cowls, water got trapped between the cowl and the foam and it couldn't evaporate.  I put 3 little blobs of RTV where the foam used to be so the cowl is still supported but there's no place for water to hide.

Ah.  Yeah, I can see that.  I like your solution.  I will take some extra care with gluing the pads in place and will apply sealant around the edges of the foam to keep water from getting in under them.

Edited by inline6
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Posted (edited)

Decided to switch over to installing more "tar mat".  Where I left off was with the passenger compartment floor surfaces finished with both a layer of Second Skin mat and a layer of factory mat cut and installed.  I had only installed the Second Skin on the tunnel.  So, cut and installed the factory mat on top of that on the driveshaft tunnel.  

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I didn't take as many pictures showing step by step progress, as this is a repeat of sorts of similar prior work.  A bit of finishing work is needed for the front tunnel piece where it meets the fire wall.  After that, all that is left is the rear hatch area.

IMG_20210823_200632.jpg

 

Edited by inline6
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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks!  This past weekend I started on the hatch floor area.  In looking at the templates you created, I realized that those are for a series 1 car.  So, they differ a bit from my series 2.  Once again I had to do some investigative work, looking closely at clues on my car to decipher where the original sound deadening mat was.  My car still had the mat present behind the shock tower, but the portion between and in front of the shock towers had been removed by a prior owner.

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After careful removal of some kind of black coating, likely applied by this same owner, I was able to see where the original mat use to be.  The original silver paint outlines where it was.  I started applying tape so I could make a template:

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The outline was taped off.  Then masking paper was used to fill in the outline.  

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Next, I removed the remainder of the factory sound deadening.  Then, I used the template to cut the Second Skin mats.  The adhesive backing is still in place on each mat.  Fitment was done first with each mat held into position by using masking tape.  Next, I will properly strip the hatch floor so it is prepped for a coat of epoxy primer.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I picked back up on the work in the rear hatch area.  I removed the remaining portion of the old sound deadening mat and found a bit of rust under it. 

IMG_20210829_164225.jpg  IMG_20210829_164247.jpg  IMG_20210829_164312.jpg

I tried to remove it with a wire brush on a 4.5" grinder, and some hand sanding, but when you have the ability to strip with a "sand" blaster, everything else feels inferior when considering the result.  Unfortunately, sand gets everywhere, so time for clean-up becomes a major factory.  I should have stripped the rear hatch floor at the same time that I did the passenger compartment floor.  I would have saved a lot of time in the long run.

After sand blasting, I sprayed epoxy primer to the bare metal:

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I then applied the Second Skin pieces which I fabricated last weekend.  The adhesive on this butyl rubber sound dampening is very strong.  You have to be very careful when it first contacts the car to have it positioned correctly.  After those were all in place, I used the backing paper from them as templates for the factory type of insulation.  These templates are more accurate than my initial paper templates. 

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When cutting the factory mat, I made the cutline about 3/32" outside the template edge.  This makes the factory type mat a touch bigger and allows the edges to radius over/around the second skin mat for a slightly better look in my opinion.  

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Finally, the effort to replicate the factory sound deadening mat is nearly complete, just a bit more to do at the firewall.  I will be applying a 3M flexible seam sealer to all of the edges so that water can't get under it anywhere in the future.   I am pleased with how it turned out.  It is difficult, in my opinion, to distinguish it from the factory applied original, however it has the benefits of more modern technology - butyl rubber, strong adhesive, metal foil for heat shielding. The factory type stuff on top which looks nicer though and conforms to compound curves more easily.  The resulting sound deadening is noticeably better.  

 

Edited by inline6
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While I was doing the above work, I snapped these pictures which clearly show evidence of how water came into the car from the quarter panel vents.   The hole in the quarter panel has this "U" shaped plate behind it which has some seal sealer not very well applied to the edges where it meets the inside surface of the quarter panel:

IMG_20210906_140125.jpg

 

In the bottom right hand portion of this photo, you can see where water ran down from the vent to the junction of the inner fender wheel well and the quarter panel. The car is at 90 degrees on the rotisserie with the left side of the car facing the floor:

IMG_20210906_140014.jpg

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It seems wise to apply more seam sealer to the "U" shaped piece to make sure it doesn't let water in along its edges.  That said, the top of it is open.  So, it is not a good idea to hit that vent with a stream from a hose.  🙂

I will be be applying some spray on sound deadener to the inside surfaces of the quarter panel.  However, before that, I will be prepping and addressing any suspicious areas of factory sealant to ensure no water can get into cause trouble.

*edit - I also noticed today that the bottom of the three holes that hold on the Z emblem is located below the bottom of the "U" plate, whereas the two others are contained within it.  So, the bottom hole is more problematic for letting water in for what that is worth. 

 

Edited by inline6
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