gotham22

Rust Advice 78 280z

    Recommended Posts

    The riveted patch panels in the frame rails scare me....

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    4 minutes ago, wheee! said:

    The riveted patch panels in the frame rails scare me....

    RIVETS.......were meant for aircraft made mostly of composites and aluminum, Not completely metal motocars!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    No offense to the later model 280Z owners...but it is "just" a 1978 280Z.  A much better 280Z can be found for much less than it will cost to fix that one.  If it doesn't have sentimental value, there's not much point to fixing it.  Unless you want a good long project to work on.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    58 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

    No offense to the later model 280Z owners...but it is "just" a 1978 280Z.  A much better 280Z can be found for much less than it will cost to fix that one.  If it doesn't have sentimental value, there's not much point to fixing it.  Unless you want a good long project to work on.

    I don't disagree totally, however, I find that the 280Z 's will be much harder to find in the coming years. Any attempts to save ANY of the S30's should be considered at this point....

    • Like 2

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    No not driving.  Figured that would be a bad idea!  As for salt, I never drive in the winter or early spring.  Too afraid of the salt!!  My wife might object to me moving to a non-salty environment!!  HA!

    • Like 1

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I meant that it looks like it has seen salt.  Your fender well edges might be rotting.  The rear shelf under the hatch lid.  Inside the gas fill area.  It only takes one trip after a snow storm to load things up with salty grime.  It just sits there and works.

    Plus, somebody has already been fixing, as shown by the riveted supports.  There's probably filled or painted over rust areas. 

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    4 hours ago, Zed Head said:

      A much better 280Z can be found for much less than it will cost to fix that one. 

    Your car is still restorable but if you can't do it yourself then this ^

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I want to thank you for all of your replies. It means a lot, especially as I am a novice.  I have decided to attempt to do it myself.  Doesn’t look like I can make it any worse!  Ha!  Your advice has been extremely helpful. I love this car!  It has been a dream of mine to own one.  I just had a baby, she is 4 months old so progress will be slow on the car But I will update the thread as i get stuff done so others like me can learn. This is truly a great community. 

    • Thanks 2

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Good for you to tackle that job, and congrats on the baby, if she is your 1st welcome to the roller coaster of parent hood. They grow very fast out of the stage, so enjoy while you can.

    I would suggest you get a good quality welder, think of it as a long term investment, be prepared to spend 1k min. I got a cheap o from HF to weld up some exhaust pipe. Should have spent the money for a 120/240 with more controls on current. I got the 240 which is a pain to power up, I would think that the 120 option should be fine for thin sheet metal. Also buy a big cylinder of shield gas, don't be tempted to try using flux rod, makes a big mess. As a novice I think the best possible equipment will make the experience less pain, and also get some scrap body parts to practice on.

    • Like 1

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    14 hours ago, gotham22 said:

    I want to thank you for all of your replies. It means a lot, especially as I am a novice.  I have decided to attempt to do it myself.  Doesn’t look like I can make it any worse!  Ha!  Your advice has been extremely helpful. I love this car!  It has been a dream of mine to own one.  I just had a baby, she is 4 months old so progress will be slow on the car But I will update the thread as i get stuff done so others like me can learn. This is truly a great community. 

    I have been putting #6333 back together close to ten years! But things are done exactly the way I want them! NO SHORTCUTS WHATSOEVER. I plan to give one to both my sons if they should want them so it has to be right!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    3 hours ago, Dave WM said:

    Good for you to tackle that job, and congrats on the baby, if she is your 1st welcome to the roller coaster of parent hood. They grow very fast out of the stage, so enjoy while you can.

    I would suggest you get a good quality welder, think of it as a long term investment, be prepared to spend 1k min. I got a cheap o from HF to weld up some exhaust pipe. Should have spent the money for a 120/240 with more controls on current. I got the 240 which is a pain to power up, I would think that the 120 option should be fine for thin sheet metal. Also buy a big cylinder of shield gas, don't be tempted to try using flux rod, makes a big mess. As a novice I think the best possible equipment will make the experience less pain, and also get some scrap body parts to practice on.

    Yes 1K is just about right and definitely try to learn using gas, (argon& Co2 mix) I was fortunate in that sense though. My Dad got a summer job for me working with him when I was just 15 years old welding. I hit 60 this year so there was a re-familiarization process but it was like riding a bike. If there is a junior college in your area it might be worth looking into to see if they offer a 1 semester class. You might find you like working with metal. Many real cool ideas if you are DIY guy. CONGRATULATIONS on the new addition BTW

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    11 minutes ago, grannyknot said:

    Cancer is right, you will want to fix that section completely before moving to the next area so as not to weaken any part of the unibody too much. Looks good

    Wouldn't be bad idea to weld on some temporary cross members before chopping commenced. 

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Not supposed to see the ground right?!  Ugghh.  Someone tried to do a half assed fiberglass repair that I cut out today.  In the second picture (the one without daylight to the ground) , is this just a coating applied to the metal?

    IMG_1149.jpg

    IMG_1150.jpg

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Consider it after market cross ventilation😁.  At least you had more floorboard than hole.  Repairs ON!  

    On the tunnel, that looks like typical factory sound deadening/ insulation, a tar like coating.  I've heard dry ice and a scraper work well to remove it.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    So what would be the procedure here? I know I need to cut and grind until I get to good metal. Do i remove the frame rail first or fix the floor pan then do the frame rail?


    Sent from my iPhone using Classic Zcar Club mobile

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I would start by removing the pedal box, console, steering wheel ... then all the stock sound deadening and any fiber glass that was added so you can clearly see  where the rust starts.  Cutting the rust out of the floor pan first allows you to keep the rigidity of the frame rail until the floor is repaired, the rail under the floor pan is pretty easy to remove but if you can save the angled part of the rail that is visible in your pic then do so. That part of the frame is complicated and difficult to replicate as it ties together several areas. 

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    A little more progress today.  Think I am going to replace the entire frame rail.  Where is the best place for a jack stand if I am removing the frame rail.  Right now it is on the rail.

    IMG_1157.jpg

    IMG_1153.jpg

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Ideally the car would be stripped to the shell and you would be in a shop with a proper frame jig that would prevent any movement of the other components as you cut out that major support.  Since  you are working on your driveway you'll want to spread that load out equally to many support points so that the dimensions of the uni body don't change. Screw jacks are good for this kind of job, you could also use off cuts from building lumber with wedges.

    Is the engine still in the car? You will have to be careful to support all the weight of the engine, the body could twist easily once that rail is cut out, maybe use an engine hoist/cherry picker to take the weight of the engine from above.

     

    Edit- gotham22, I just went through all of your photos again and your car really is on the balancing point between parting it out and major surgery. It can be saved but it will be extensive.

    My advice if you want to go ahead is strip this car down to the shell, not only so you can find all the rust that hasn't been discovered yet but also to take the weight off the frame. No half measures.

    Edited by grannyknot
    • Like 2

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I appreciate everyone’s optimism to save all the Z’s, but this one should probably be parted out. This is not novice territory. This will be a hard lesson on biting off more than you can chew. No garage, not even thinkable. Part it out and find another body- you’ll save time , money and stress in the end

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    So far it's just been pictures of rusty and/or missing metal.  What's the rest of the car look like?

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now