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ryanotown22

Removing 280z tail housing

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I Removed the 8 12mm bolts from the tail housing, I also removed the little pin with the c clip. What do I have to do next to separate the tail section? The striker arm now moves out about an inch or 2 inches.

 

 

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IIRC striker rod has to be turned to the extreme CCW (viewed from behind). That will clear out the fork from the shift rods. I assume it has a reverse lockout if you are working on a ZX.

this guy just beats the heck of it, then twist the rear section off to release the striker rod from the shift forks.

 

Edited by Dave WM

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Ok yeah I just beat it off the dowel pins with a rubber mallet now onto second problem. How do I get this bolt out so I can remove the striking rod? I saw in your video the transmission has a port and you could just knock it out. Looks like the 77-78 does not have that port so there is almost no room in there

9fe6ca2a0055ccdb631f2d1056468120.jpg


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ok so no reverse lock out, think your best bet would be to put a nut back on it and just get as small a tapping device as you can find and start in on it. its wedged in but will come out. you maybe able to get some channel locks in there and see if you can squeeze on it the nut (protect the threads) with a socket on the other side for the pin  to press into.

I know its a PITA.

Edited by Dave WM

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I agree. Put the nut back on just enough to cover the top threads. Tap it with a small hammer or similar. If it won't let go, you can try to heat the arm. DON'T heat the threaded bolt (coter pin). It should release easier then.

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Nope not budging tried heat also. I wonder what the official tool/method was. It seems a tool like a bike chain pin remover would be great but those are too small.

 

 

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I put the nut back on it most of the way. Lay a steel bar into the case laying on the nut and strike it with a hammer. It should come out.

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try cold, invert a can of dust off, aim at the nut, freeze to shrink the nut/pin.

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Tried the steel bar method and hitting it with a 5# hammer still not budging going to try the freeze method next after I pick up some dust off


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Have you tried sliding the striker back and forth, hard, to loosen it up?    You could also double-nut the threads and give it some hard twisting.  If I know the shape it's a wedge that should pop free if stressed right.

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I did this last summer and it is very frustrating trying to apply enough force but not damage the bolt. In the end, what worked for me is a combination of what EuroDat and Patcon wrote. I used lots of heat. left the nut on to protect the threads. Tried to avoid heating the bolt and instead direct heat to the fork body. Key though was to use a steel bar resting on the nut so that I could hammer from closer to outside of the housing. I used a 3/8" socket extension with the square side resting on the nut. I would heat and then tap. Eventually, it moved. I bet I worked at it for 2 hours too. Be patient and it will eventually free up. 

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This on on the same list with removing spindle pins as a headache.. you would think there would be a better design.. of course the fsm just says remove striking arm bolt.. I am surprised it doesn’t show a finger just pushing it out. I am giving in and going to try and take it somewhere. At least on the later 5speeds you have a way to get to it via the reverse lockout hole in the case.


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How about drilling the other end of the pin, threading it, and using a slide hammer?

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did you try ZH double nut idea? what you need is some kind of small press like device (puller for ball joints etc...) the thing is once is cracks loose you cant believe it could ever get that stuck. Its not rusted or any other way of corroded on.

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I would be careful about taking it some place and letting anyone swing away at it. They'll get it out....but.

I do agree that removing this bolt is on par with spindle pins. Actually, I think it is worse. 

The good news for me is I am refreshing a 4spd transmission later this month so will enjoy the bolt removal joy again.

Best of luck!

Edited by jonathanrussell

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I haven’t tried the double nut idea yet. I am in AZ and dealing with a 120 degree garage so I only work for a little bit in the morning. Do you think once I get it out if replacing it with a regular bolt would be ok?

 

 

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1 hour ago, ryanotown22 said:

I haven’t tried the double nut idea yet. I am in AZ and dealing with a 120 degree garage so I only work for a little bit in the morning. Do you think once I get it out if replacing it with a regular bolt would be ok?

 

 

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oh no, its a wedge bolt, you will see when you get it out. precision fit to the two parts. Its a little incomprehensible as to why it get stuck in the 1st place. The slightest movement should set it free.

Edited by Dave WM

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If you have a drill or drill press and some taps you might could make a tool to free it. Take a piece of steel schedule 40 pipe big enough to go all the way over the bolt and arm. Drill a hole in the pipe and tap it for a bolt, maybe 1/2" or 7/16". Make a hole on the opposite side for the wedge bolt to push out of. Slide it over the wedge bolt & arm and thread the "press" bolt into the pipe against the nut on the end of the wedge bolt to force it out

Edit: Home depot has some black and galv sched 40 pipe. If it doesn't have to be too big of an id. I don't remember off the top of my head how big you would need. You might could just buy a close nipple the right size so you don't have to buy a long piece of pipe

Edited by Patcon
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Everything looks good the rod is a little bent from all my hammering but nothing I can’t straighten. The little arm where the bolt goes through does have a little damage from the drill but it’s not on the rod side so I don’t think it will affect use. I have another bolt arriving Tuesday so I will know then. The slot on the rod where the bolt locks into is also fine

 

 

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New pin arrived today in the mail it’s copper color unlike the one I took out that was silver but it fits perfect no play at all between the arm and the rod. I also was able to straighten out the rod pretty easily. Now I am just waiting on my o rings from courtesynissan to ship before I can put it together again.

 IMG_1875.JPG

 

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