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Does anyone have the name and contact information for the restorer of the Franklin Mint 240Z? 

Thanks JLP

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3 hours ago, JLPurcell said:

Does anyone have the name and contact information for the restorer of the Franklin Mint 240Z? 

Thanks JLP

The "240ZGuild" didn't do anything to the car other than buy it and flip it on BaT.  The car was restored in the 1990's by Bill Reagan with additional work done by Banzai Motorworks subsequently to help get it up to gold medallion standards.

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2 hours ago, Mike B said:

The "240ZGuild" didn't do anything to the car other than buy it and flip it on BaT.  The car was restored in the 1990's by Bill Reagan with additional work done by Banzai Motorworks subsequently to help get it up to gold medallion standards.

Thats correct. The 'guild' were just the flippers.

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14 hours ago, JLPurcell said:

Does anyone have the name and contact information for the restorer of the Franklin Mint 240Z? 

Thanks JLP

Bill Reagan an E.E. by profession - restored the car in his spare time over about one year. As a member of the Texas Z Car Club, he wrote a series of articles covering the restoration process for the Club's News letter. He also published a booklet that combined all the articles, and sold the booklet to help others.  He said he spent about $12K-$14K in 1990-92. Then sold it to Paul who then spent a ton of money on it between 92 and 95.

Wonder if the Texas Z Car Club still has any of the Newsletters in digital form? At one point I seem to recall them being on their Club Web Page...

BillReaganGuideSm.jpg

In the Articles Bill tells how the Z was saved from a trip to the Salvage Yard - when a tree fill on it. The damage would have totaled it out in 1990, but But Bill purchased it for $100.00 and started the restoration. So a large part of the amazing story about its history is how it went from $100.00 Datsun 240Z - to a $124,240.00 Datsun 240Z. All of which makes it quite unique..  even in the Pure Stock world.

Edited by Carl Beck
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So it has some damage history. That makes the numbers even more interesting 

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OibpmF4.png?2

 

Based on reports

Fender/hood/cowl/battery tray area all replaced

inner wheel well andFirewall and frame rail damaged.

 

I'd guess that the BAT seller told the buyer and/or disclosed this in the auction? 

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12 minutes ago, Jason240z said:

Based on reports

Fender/hood/cowl/battery tray area all replaced

inner wheel well andFirewall and frame rail damaged.

I'd guess that the BAT seller told the buyer and/or disclosed this in the auction? 

Good one!  I got a chuckle out of that last sentence.  Part of the fun of buying a car at auction, or any 50 year old used car, are the surprises that come to light after the sale.  All part of the adventure.  Used car salesmen, horse traders, military recruiters, Trojans bearing gifts.......they all bear watching and the exercise of due diligence.  Still chuckling.

Dennis 

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8 minutes ago, psdenno said:

Good one!  I got a chuckle out of that last sentence.  Part of the fun of buying a car at auction, or any 50 year old used car, are the surprises that come to light after the sale.  All part of the adventure.  Used car salesmen, horse traders, military recruiters, Trojans bearing gifts.......they all bear watching and the exercise of due diligence.  Still chuckling.

Dennis 

Glad my sarcasm came through 😁

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The seller, 240Z Guild, offered 5 copies of the restoration guide on facebook and they sold in minutes. 😕

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3 hours ago, Carl Beck said:

 All of which makes it quite unique.. 

Unless you know two of these cars with the same prefix and body serial number combination, they are each - by definition - unique.

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1 hour ago, psdenno said:

Good one!  I got a chuckle out of that last sentence.  Part of the fun of buying a car at auction, or any 50 year old used car, are the surprises that come to light after the sale.  All part of the adventure.  Used car salesmen, horse traders, military recruiters, Trojans bearing gifts.......they all bear watching and the exercise of due diligence.  Still chuckling.

Dennis 

In addition to Bill's documentation of the rebuild. The good thing about BAT is that anyone/everyone has the opportunity to ask questions and/or ask for more specific pictures of the car. In this case the seller did Post several of the photographs taken during the metal and body work. I'm pretty sure that whoever purchased it was fully aware of the extent of the metal or panel work. That plus the fact that it was done 26+ years earlier and has held up so well most likely eased the buyers mind.

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30 minutes ago, Carl Beck said:

In addition to Bill's documentation of the rebuild. The good thing about BAT is that anyone/everyone has the opportunity to ask questions and/or ask for more specific pictures of the car. In this case the seller did Post several of the photographs taken during the metal and body work. I'm pretty sure that whoever purchased it was fully aware of the extent of the metal or panel work. That plus the fact that it was done 26+ years earlier and has held up so well most likely eased the buyers mind.

The other great thing about bring a trailer is that all the interesting comments get marked as 'not constructive' and removed.  Also the seller and direct the conversation, looks like it happened quite a bit on there. 

Edited by Jason240z

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15 minutes ago, Jason240z said:

The other great thing about bring a trailer is that all the interesting comments get marked as 'not constructive' and removed.  Also the seller and direct the conversation, I guess in an ideal situation you'd have a few friends on there helping to drive it and forming a little protective gang around opinions?

Can't agree with the statement that "interesting comments" get flagged as "not constructive".  There are a few self proclaimed experts who like to do a little "baiting" on BaT.  They get flagged.  As for Friends of Seller adding comments, why not?  Sometimes they may offer valid first hand information about a car to inform a bidder and sometimes, they may be shills.  It's all part of the auction adventure and if a bidder is uncomfortable with that, it's time to move on.  I think we've flogged this deceased equine sufficiently.

Dennis

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11 hours ago, psdenno said:

Can't agree with the statement that "interesting comments" get flagged as "not constructive".  There are a few self proclaimed experts who like to do a little "baiting" on BaT.  They get flagged. 

As has been pointed out before now, comments on BaT auctions are pre-moderated so there are already hurdles to jump before they get thrown in front of the lions for the 'discussion'. How many 'not constructive' flags does it take for a comment to be deleted? Seems to me that its only a handful, so its easy to make it happen even if the comment is on-topic, correct and constructive. Quite a lot of scope there for sharp practice from all sides and a small cadre - or even an individual with several BaT log-ins - can make them evaporate. In fact the whole format is weird. Biggest comments spammer in this car's case was the winning bidder.

I'd be interested to hear who your "self proclaimed experts" are. Would they be the type of people who claim that the car in question would have arrived from Japan with a Hitachi battery, and that Yuasa batteries were not supplied until at least 1973? Or are they the people who pointed out that the hood/bonnet is not necessarily correct for the production date of the car, or that the factory blacking of the radiator support panel has not been replicated? Is that "baiting", or fair comment?

Plenty of life left in this horse, I'd say.

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I'm trying to follow the pea...

"This 240Z is offered by the selling dealer in Oklahoma with ... a clean Delaware title."

Back when Bill R. bought the damaged car for $100 (in TX?), was it a salvage title?

Did the guy he bought from have comp. coverage on it when the tree fell on it and buy it back from the insurance company?

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I especially enjoyed the battery conversation, Alan.  You, young lad, evidently don't remember the Normandy landings!  So consider that the Hitachi expert went searching in junk yards for a replacement battery.  As Bugs Bunny used to say; "What a buffoon".

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16 minutes ago, 26th-Z said:

I especially enjoyed the battery conversation, Alan.  You, young lad, evidently don't remember the Normandy landings!  So consider that the Hitachi expert went searching in junk yards for a replacement battery.  As Bugs Bunny used to say; "What a buffoon".

Oops.

*I* just went searching in junkyards for Kioto headlights. Unsuccessfully.

It was for a friend, though...  🙂

Edited by jayhawk

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16 minutes ago, 26th-Z said:

I especially enjoyed the battery conversation, Alan.  You, young lad, evidently don't remember the Normandy landings!  So consider that the Hitachi expert went searching in junk yards for a replacement battery.  As Bugs Bunny used to say; "What a buffoon".

I'm more than ready to learn something new. That's the buzz. And every day is a school day with these cars, isn't it?

What I don't get is people being happy to accept anecdotal evidence (from 1973 or something...) trumping primary-source evidence. That primary-source evidence isn't mine, it's Nissan's.

We need to be open-minded and pragmatic about this kind of stuff, and we all know that Nissan juggled suppliers to give us endless fun trying to make sense of it 50 years down the line, but I want to see evidence to back up a claim like that. School me! I want to see a photo of one of these sooper dooper Hitachi batteries in an S30-series Z body in 1969/1970. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, jayhawk said:

Oops.

*I* just went searching in junkyards for Kioto headlights. Unsuccessfully.

It was for a friend, though...  🙂

Jayhawks, when searching for parts for my restoration, I pulled a set of  Koito (sp) headlights from

a junkyard car probably 15 years ago.  Never tested so don’t know if they work.  

If anyone is interest, PM me with offers.

Dan

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Oh, headlights don't qualify.  I have some great stuff from junkyards.  Must be a Maroon!🤤

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