Jump to content

IGNORED

Restoration of BringaTrailer 240z - HLS30-35883


inline6

Recommended Posts


Today, I fabricated the front rolling frame assembly.  The cross beam is thicker wall that the rear one - it is heavy.  I didn't measure it, but the wall is about 3/16" - definitely thicker than the rear one which looks to be about 1/8" wall.  When welding the square post to it, I had my little Miller Mig 90 maxed out.  While welding, I would sit the end of the nozzle on top of the cross beam and wait and wait, and then kiss the edge of the square tubing and then back over the cross beam... and wait and wait, and then kiss the upright square tubing again.  Easily spent 4 to 5 times as long trying to put heat into the cross beam to get penetration.  The plates that mount to the car are nearly 3/16" thick.  Though the welds could be prettier, I am confident they have good strength.  

IMG_20211219_165917.jpg  IMG_20211219_172540.jpg  IMG_20211219_165930.jpg

 

IMG_20211219_165835.jpg  IMG_20211219_170221.jpg  IMG_20211219_172512.jpg

 

It will be an exciting time when I get to use these as the car will be really close to being ready for paint.  😍

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice work on the rolling frame components. While I'm waiting for my body guy to pickup my shell, I have been considering doing something similar. I might use a combination of fabricated parts plus unistrut channel, fittings and hardware. I've used unistrut in the past for jig and fixturing and equipment frames and found it to be very useful for allowing adjustability and minimizing welding. It would make very easy to add braces and front to rear long members. Also when the time comes, it can be disassembled easily for storage or use in other projects. Here is an image of a past project and a link to a unistrut page showing some hardware examples. Their channel nuts and brackets make very rigid connections.

image.png

https://www.unistrutohio.com/general-unistrut-fittings

 

Edited by CanTechZ
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/19/2021 at 9:13 AM, inline6 said:

Hmmm.  Maybe I should do that.  I'm not ready to use these, won't be for a while longer.  I'll have to look for suitable "drops" at my local metal store.  Those are the leftover bits that they sell for a single rate by weight. 

Texas Precision Plating got my two shipments ok.  Hope they turn my parts around in the early part of January.  Once I get them back, I can bolt on inner fender supports, the fenders, and the inspection lids for the last time.  Then, I can proceed with the last of the primer coats and final sanding on the fenders.  There are still a few other areas to address with further bodywork, such as an area on the passenger door, and the rear tail panel.  Getting closer to paint! 

While the car is at the paint shop, I plan to Black Diamond blast all of the black parts and prime and paint them.  It would be easier to drop them all off at a powder coater.  But, I figure epoxy primer and paint will be much more durable than the factory's original attempt, but look more authentic. 

I wish all of my efforts, all of this, was for an early VIN car for value reasons, but hey, 240z's in this good of a starting condition are somewhat hard to find.    

I think at this point you will be rewarded with value even though it's not an early car. 

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/20/2021 at 7:23 AM, CanTechZ said:

Here is an image of a past project and a link to a unistrut page showing some hardware examples. Their channel nuts and brackets make very rigid connections.

image.png

https://www.unistrutohio.com/general-unistrut-fittings

 

I looked around a bit on their site.  Looks like the ultimate erector set.  There are so many pieces!  It would take me hours to look at what all is available and then figure out what I'd need.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, inline6 said:

I looked around a bit on their site.  Looks like the ultimate erector set.  There are so many pieces!  It would take me hours to look at what all is available and then figure out what I'd need.  

Over the holiday break I plan to layout and model supports using ideas from your pictures and @ConVerTT's jig pictures.

While looking for framing ideas I found this vintage unistrut video, and couldn't resist sharing. Lol

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/21/2021 at 3:25 PM, inline6 said:

I looked around a bit on their site.  Looks like the ultimate erector set.  There are so many pieces!  It would take me hours to look at what all is available and then figure out what I'd need.  

In case you might be interested, here is how I plan to make a rolling support frame for my shell using Unistrut. I'm using the same mounting points as you did. Hopefully I will be assembling it in a couple of weeks. Thanks for the inspiration, I will be posting the end result in my own resto thread.

Chassis Support IMG 01.JPG

Chassis Support IMG 02.JPG

Chassis Support IMG 04.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, inline6 said:

While waiting for fasteners to be re-plated, I find myself looking for little projects to complete.  I went about restoring the front turn signal assemblies yesterday and today. These front lenses get a lot of abuse... essentially, they get sand blasted over time.  These are likely original to the car.  They look ok at 10 feet, but get up close and you can see they are quite dull.  And, they have taken some impacts from rocks and road debris.  The close ups were taken at 5X magnification.

IMG_20211230_124152.jpg  IMG_20211230_124216.jpg  IMG_20211230_124231.jpg

 

I used several grits of sandpaper and performed a wet sanding process.  I started with 320 grit, then moved on to 600, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500.  For the first two grits, I left tape in place to protect the lettering.  After wet sanding, I buff with Meguiar's compounds and foam buffing pads.  #83 first, then #7 "Show Glaze", using different buffing pads to keep from mixing.  While I didn't achieve perfection, the results are pretty good.  

IMG_20211230_124256.jpg  IMG_20211230_124415.jpg  IMG_20211230_153311.jpg

 

IMG_20211231_122841.jpg  IMG_20211231_122737.jpg  IMG_20211231_122558.jpg

 

IMG_20211231_122426.jpg  IMG_20211231_122807.jpg  IMG_20211230_153352.jpg

 

Next up will be the rear tail light lenses.  They will be easy in comparison because they don't take the sandblasting impacts like the front lenses.

Very nice. I did this on a set of JDM chromed bezel headlight lenses. I used MicroMesh system.

Edited by DC871F
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, inline6 said:

While waiting for fasteners to be re-plated, I find myself looking for little projects to complete.  I went about restoring the front turn signal assemblies yesterday and today. These front lenses get a lot of abuse... essentially, they get sand blasted over time.  These are likely original to the car.  They look ok at 10 feet, but get up close and you can see they are quite dull.  And, they have taken some impacts from rocks and road debris.  The close ups were taken at 5X magnification.

IMG_20211230_124152.jpg  IMG_20211230_124216.jpg  IMG_20211230_124231.jpg

 

I used several grits of sandpaper and performed a wet sanding process.  I started with 320 grit, then moved on to 600, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500.  For the first two grits, I left tape in place to protect the lettering.  After wet sanding, I buff with Meguiar's compounds and foam buffing pads.  #83 first, then #7 "Show Glaze", using different buffing pads to keep from mixing.  While I didn't achieve perfection, the results are pretty good.  

IMG_20211230_124256.jpg  IMG_20211230_124415.jpg  IMG_20211230_153311.jpg

 

IMG_20211231_122841.jpg  IMG_20211231_122737.jpg  IMG_20211231_122558.jpg

 

IMG_20211231_122426.jpg  IMG_20211231_122807.jpg  IMG_20211230_153352.jpg

 

Next up will be the rear tail light lenses.  They will be easy in comparison because they don't take the sandblasting impacts like the front lenses.

Great job, I did similar work to my fronts a few years ago but not quite to this level. It's very satisfying to see the end result after all of the effort it takes. So much nicer to use original parts and not just replace with reproductions.

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, inline6 said:

How do you get drawings like that?  Is it some type of CAD software?

 

I used a 3D parametric cad software package called Solid Edge, made by Siemens. This is actually only the 3D model, it looks like a drawing because I imported a scaled image of the chassis from my 1970 FSM and inserted it as the background to build the model on. Still had to a lot of measuring off my car and the parts I have from Klassic Fab, but it's good to have the FSM drawing to confirm the main datums.

Edited by CanTechZ
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason that a lot of Z's rust out in that area is because the rain gutter ends too soon and dumps water right on to that spot and that spot also slopes back in toward the car so the water just sits in a pool until it evaporates.  I started adding an extension on to the rain gutters to remove the water completely.

 

IMG_0916.JPG

IMG_0107.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

About 1.5 to 2 hours tonight to get the right side panel this far:

IMG_20220104_202852.jpg

 

Before finishing the welding and adding the rosette welds, I make sure the back edge line is right:

IMG_20220104_202913.jpg

 

A few close ups:
IMG_20220104_203008.jpg  IMG_20220104_202952.jpg  IMG_20220104_203001.jpg

Rightmost edge (bottom of the third pic in the set) is a tad off compared to the original, but a bit of seam sealer goes here and will cover that up without issue.  "X" marks are where rosette welds will go.  

Wonder if the plating process has been started on my parts.  But, I told them they could take their time.  I've got many hours left of body work to invest in the tail light panel to bring it up to the same level as the rest of the car.  Plus, I have plenty of other projects to keep busy with.  Definitely starting to feel a lot closer to getting this thing painted.  I will check in with the place I have in mind to paint it and see about getting the car painted in March or April.  

Edited by inline6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2022 at 9:33 PM, grannyknot said:

The reason that a lot of Z's rust out in that area is because the rain gutter ends too soon and dumps water right on to that spot and that spot also slopes back in toward the car so the water just sits in a pool until it evaporates.  I started adding an extension on to the rain gutters to remove the water completely.

 

IMG_0916.JPG

IMG_0107.JPG

Ok, that's awesome. I may have to do this on my project.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, DC871F said:

Ok, that's awesome. I may have to do this on my project.

I don't have the skills like Grannyknot does but I did see the short rain channel problem way back when so now I always pop the hatch and dry that area after washing or the rare rained on times.

I actually open the hood, hatch and both doors and blow the whole car off with my backpack blower before towel drying.

Have you read about the cowl drain behind the passenger's front tire?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, siteunseen said:

Have you read about the cowl drain behind the passenger's front tire?

 

I did a while ago and forgot about this. I'll be adding these to my build. Thanks for sharing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finished the repair to the right side of the tail light panel today.  Then I grabbed the tail light trim panels and the new plastic rivet-like fasteners (note the size of these original parts - some people use the wrong fasteners here) and worked on fitment.  It is best to test fit and massage things now rather than after paint.  Generally, the fit of my panels is good, however I have been able to improve it.  The tail light finisher panels are made of thin metal and are easily tweaked.  This car was tapped from behind, so I am making sure to spend time here to make things right.  

I used a small belt sander to clean up the edges of the panels... in some areas I removed material from the edges to improve the fit where the tail light panels overlap with the car body.

IMG_20220108_180512.jpg  IMG_20220108_180648.jpg  IMG_20220108_180548.jpg

IMG_20220108_180542.jpg  IMG_20220108_180709.jpg  IMG_20220108_180504.jpg

IMG_20220108_180832.jpg  IMG_20220108_180847.jpg  IMG_20220108_180604.jpg

 

I have many hours of hammer and dolly work in the tail light panel.  I even had to shrink parts of the panel below the bumper line.  In fact, I will also need to do some shrinking around the top left corner of the right tail light opening.  It is pushed in a bit and is "oil canning" when I move it back where it belongs.  I believe it got pushed in a tad when the car was tapped in the rear.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Picking up on the tail light panel, I applied some filler and worked further on the tail light trim panel fit.  I also got out the new old stock (nos) license light assembly to check its fit.  I am glad I did because I have a fit problem.  I did not expect it, but better to find out now than after paint.  It is wise to check panel fit as body work is done, especially in areas that it is known that a car was damaged.  This is a new learning for me that I discovered during the restoration of this car.  

Using a bright LCD light at a 90 degree angle helps show high and low areas:

IMG_20220116_124527.jpg  IMG_20220116_124539.jpg  IMG_20220116_124546.jpg

IMG_20220116_124551.jpg  IMG_20220116_171137.jpg  IMG_20220116_171209.jpg

 

The tail light trim panels are pretty flimsy pieces of metal, generally speaking.  Over 50 years, they likely have taken some abuse and therefore, it is a really good idea to get them to fit perfectly before covering them (and the car) in paint.  The gap between the right panel (first pic just below) and the quarter panel (right edge) is a tad narrower than the same gap on the left panel to the quarter panel.  Also, it is hard to see (third pic just below), but the bottom edge of the three trim panels (left, right, and license) does not stay in line with the sheet metal on the car.  In the center, the body of the car sticks out a bit more than on the two ends.

IMG_20220116_150605.jpg  IMG_20220116_150620.jpg  IMG_20220116_150807.jpg

 

Because this car was hit in the rear lightly, I am checking all of the fit and adjusting.  These two pics are of the left and right side of the center, license plate trim panel.  There are small sheet metal stand offs that locate the bottom of the panel away from the body.  A .5 mm difference was measured - so I need to adjust it.  While I am at it, I want to make sure the gap around the left, bottom and right edges of the three panels is as uniform as possible.  The left lower corner (third pic) is inconsistent and much wider than...

IMG_20220116_151038.jpg  IMG_20220116_151056.jpg  IMG_20220116_170710.jpg

 

the right lower corner (first pic).  There was no damage to the car in these inside corners, so this fit is "factory".  The second and third pic show the width of the gap along the bottom.  It looks pretty good.

IMG_20220116_170731.jpg  IMG_20220116_170900.jpg  IMG_20220116_170807.jpg

 

The license plate light doesn't fit very well at the moment.  Glad I tested fit.  The top edge of the panel needs some adjusting to bring the left side mounting screw area upwards a bit:

IMG_20220116_171658.jpg  IMG_20220116_172313.jpg  IMG_20220116_172827.jpg

 

More hours down, and more to go for sure on this area.

 

 

Edited by inline6
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.