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Video: OS Giken TC16-MA2 and a LY-240Z racing


Hallowed

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Thanks for providing the link. That was a really great video. I would have loved to see some of those cars in action. The red Fairlady Z in the beginning with the LY crossflow head is a 2.9 liter engine and the car belongs to Mr. Akamatsu. It is a very stunning car. It sounds extremely sexy.

Take care,

Ben :)

p.s. The Datsun 510/Nissan Bluebird are really great cars. The Bluebird with the TC16 in this video is even more special.

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Thanks for providing the link. That was a really great video. I would have loved to see some of those cars in action. The red Fairlady Z in the beginning with the LY crossflow head is a 2.9 liter engine and the car belongs to Mr. Akamatsu. It is a very stunning car. It sounds extremely sexy.

Take care,

Ben :)

p.s. The Datsun 510/Nissan Bluebird are really great cars. The Bluebird with the TC16 in this video is even more special.

Ben,

I didn't mean to imply it was an L24 with an LY-Head, though I am unsure of which exact S30 that the Works team blessed with their motors. I am just beginning to delve into Datsun history. :classic: Is that a Z432? Or was that the S-motor car?

Also, the OSGiken site (after I babelfished it) gave a bit of history on their L4 monster and at the end specified its power (232 HP @ 8500, 150 lb/ft @ 6800, 1.9L), meaning it, in the 70's, was making far more power per displacement than a F20C, all the while requiring much less RPM to do so.

That said, could you give a power estimate on their L6 engine? I realize the answer would torture me, knowing I'd have to rob a bank in order to purchase one (assuming I found one for sale).

Perhaps with the sudden interest of their MAII making the show circuits, OSG could be tempted for a small production run of their fantastic engines. :)

-Phill

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Phill,

I'll answer this one before HS30-H has to repeat the history of Nissan racing engines all over again... :)

Z 432 & 69-73 Skyline GT-R had a 2L DOHC 6cyl S20 engine which featured a cross flow head. 432 actually stands for 4valves per cylinder, 3carbs, 2L - a magical formula by any brand (look at the 60s British sports cars and you'll see it's a common setup)

Some of the works Z racers featured the LY28, which was a 2.8L 6 DOHC cross-flow.

The OS Giken TC24 is a take on that old cross flow and if you download the PDF that's attached to "Part2" of the TC16 story you'll get all the specs including as I recall a quoted 300+hp and a ton of torque to boot...

As far as a new run of OSG 6cyl - don't count on it - many people more influential than you or I have asked and nothing's come of it. Like many other Japanese specialists it's a small place with limited R&D & finances and rightly so currently focused on modern cars such as the R34 GT-R... Make sense?

Search through the archived postings with the keywords: 432, GT-R, OSGiken, LY, Works Rally, etc and you'll find detailed answers to all your questions...

-e

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One final note, as for comparing an ultra low-volume high comp race motor which may require 100+ octane and wide open roads to a mass-produced eminently drivable Honda S2000 motor I don't think the comparison stands... You still have to hand it to Honda for daily driven & reliable mass produced highest HP/Liter engines I think.

-e

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One final note, as for comparing an ultra low-volume high comp race motor which may require 100+ octane and wide open roads to a mass-produced eminently drivable Honda S2000 motor I don't think the comparison stands... You still have to hand it to Honda for daily driven & reliable mass produced highest HP/Liter engines I think.

-e

I'll keep in mind that the comparison also takes into account induction (carbs vs. injection) and about 32 years of engine technology. Mass produced... perhaps, though the F430 has it conquered in any effciency rating and much lower peak torque RPM. Costs probably play a role, certainly, but that wasn't mentioned above. ;)

*edit*

Having reveiwed the .pdf, the MA2 has 10.2:1 compression. That is perfectly attainable without 100 octane fuel.

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I captured the file to disk and watched it. I just can't get the pdf file you were talking about. Nice film clips both. They wasted a bunch of time trying to get the engine started. Like I want to watch that! Nice throaty sound to it, though. 8500 rpm!

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The same thing happened to me, Carl. I right clicked and saved to file on my computer.

So thinking this was the neatest video, I took it and a catalog from "Pit Road" http://www3.ocn.ne.jp/~kyuusya/index-3.htm up to Z Mecca in Tampa this weekend. While there, I got to see a video of Japanese drag racing, two of the Sagamiko events Alan posted pictures of, and that "Best Motoring" video we talked about. Geez! I thought I had some good footage?! Slapped on some Japanese this weekend I did...

Eric, where can I get a copy of the Best Motoring videos? DVD. They were cool.

Got a big lesson in cylinder head design from the Japanese drag racers. I saw mid elevens and one 11.2 These guys are spending $15,000 on their engines. Something like the LY head is unobtanium. You have to know someone who has one well enough to obtain one. The OS Giken heads are pretty much the same story. They trade privately. What is so great about the video is getting a glimpse at hundreds of thousands of dollars being spent!

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