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Dumb dumb dummy!


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I've been having a hard time with my computer, slow to connect to czcc and everything else too.

I read about the newer routers and they reccomend a new one about every 5 years. Mine was bought in 2007! 

I "straight wired" it with some Cat 5 wire and RJ 45 connectors I had from Y2K roll out I was a part of. It went from 10 MBPS upload to 62. I pay for 50 MBPS from Comcast so it's like I have a new computer. Happy new years present to me the dummy. 

So I'll be back posting dumb stuff again, prepare yourselves. :love:

HAPPY NEW YEAR my best friends. Can't wait for ZCON 2022, right down the road in Birmingham, Alabama.

Roll Tide too!

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I was reminiscing on past internet speed, 56K and Napster. I could que 100 songs before I left for work and 8 hours later I'd have maybe 50. LOL

I had an early Dell with the CDR drive that I could burn disc with. That was a lot of fun since nobody had them and they had to like my downloads. It went from the Statler Brothers to Danzing' "Mother". LOL

My first internet was '93 or '94 with  Web Tv through my television around the time Tivos came out.

 

 

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2 hours ago, DatsunZGuy said:

It might be time for me to upgrade from Windows 98 since my Juno dial-up speed seems to be crawling on my 56K modem 😉

Man, Juno! What a throwback! I remember having a (free, which was kind of astonishing) Juno address for a while back in the mid 90s. Mostly so my parents couldn't see my inbox. Though in retrospect, they had no idea how any of it worked...

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Not "The Prodigy" As ZH put in the Saturday Night Music thread. Just Prodigy the online service. I used it in the early 1990's. Since I worked for "the phone company" (Mountain Bell) in IT, I had internet access from the office. At home the best I could do was 56Kbps dialup.

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, DatsunZGuy said:

Here is something to stump any Millennial viewing this thread 😉

TRS80.jpg

 

 

 

Certainly not a Millennial, but I recognize it as the five piece version of my first computer which was a trusty TRS-80 dual drive like the one below.  Bonus points to the Millennial who knows what "TRS" meant without Googling it.

 

Screen Shot 2022-01-02 at 4.07.23 PM.png

Edited by psdenno
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1 hour ago, siteunseen said:

My first one...

91OU7nsmu-S._AC_SL1500_.jpg

 

I had a Merlin!  I loved that game.  My first computer was an Atari 800 back in about 1980.  I had a modem for accessing bulletin boards at a whopping 300 baud.  More often than not, I'd get some sort of phone static and lose the connection before actually finishing any downloads.

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39 minutes ago, Jeff G 78 said:

More often than not, I'd lose the connection before actually finishing any downloads.

Doing movie reviews?  ROFL

"Interested.... Interested.... Very interested.... VERY interested.

Then suddenly lost interest."

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1 hour ago, Jeff G 78 said:

......I had a modem for accessing bulletin boards at a whopping 300 baud.  More often than not, I'd get some sort of phone static and lose the connection before actually finishing any downloads.

My TRS-80 had no way to access the internet.  But, that was OK because in 1983 I didn't know what internet or email accounts were.  I could save programs on floppy disks that were floppy or on a cassette tape recorder.  It was a simpler time.  No cable TV, cell phone, satellite radio, or internet monthly bills.

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3 minutes ago, psdenno said:

My TRS-80 had no way to access the internet.  But, that was OK because in 1983 I didn't know what internet or email accounts were.  I could save programs on floppy disks that were floppy or on a cassette tape recorder.  It was a simpler time.  No cable TV, cell phone, satellite radio, or internet monthly bills.

Before I had a floppy drive, I would spend hours and hours typing programs in for games from magazines. With no dri e, I would play the games for a few hours and then shut the computer off and lose it all. Fun times!

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I loaded the I think what was called the Oregon Trail game on my Commodore 64 via cassette tape. Tape data transfer worked maybe 50% of the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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5 hours ago, Av8ferg said:

I loaded the I think what was called the Oregon Trail game on my Commodore 64 via cassette tape. Tape data transfer worked maybe 50% of the time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The Diseases of The Oregon Trail - APHL Blog

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My Stone Ax is Bigger Than Yours Dept.

In the late 60s, our class was assigned to designing and executing a simple project of our choosing. As this entailed 9 to 12 in. stacks of DIY punch cards (one misplaced hole and it was back to the punch keyboard) run by a room-full of early IBM, it first defined Big Fun for many of us.

On the plus side, the experience earned me the chance to do Piping and Instrumentation diagrams for nuclear subs for a time in the mid-seventies. The system was based on an early Eclipse computer, complete with 14in platter stacks for hard drives and a nifty, if crude, flat bed plotter that used special ball-point pens.

After that, it took a while to acquire my first; an 8088 IBM clone, 5 1/2in floppies and a dot-matrix printer. I liked it better than the Apple II I used in another job.

You'd think I'd do better with the crude analog electronics they used in the Z....

 

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6 hours ago, ensys said:

flat bed plotter that used special ball-point pens.

Hihihi.. in the early '80's i designed and build a A3 Flatbedplotter, and it used normal ballpoint pen's !  I build it from the ground up.. Even the programming in 6502 and basic. I controlled it with a commodore 64!  (Has a 6510 processor) ..  38811 Basic Bytes free! HAHAHA!!  

I remember it had 2 steppermotors and it could make 13 steps in a mm on the paper..

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Posted (edited)

You guys make me feel like a neophyte.

My first computer was a Pentium II hand me down. My stepdaughter bought it used from Boeing surplus (back then Dell didn’t have the contract). She fiddled with it, then gave it to her brother to use for recording music for his garage band. It didn’t meet his needs, so he bought a new one, and asked if I wanted it.

I said sure, he brought it over and I stuck it in the corner.

Mrs. Racer 2.0 pestered me to do something with it or get rid of it. So one day I set it up, and turned it on. Then there were a bazillion calls, first to the boy, then his sister. Eventually I got it running, then got online with one of the free internet access services, with a 28.8k telephone modem.

That was 1998.

It didn’t take long and I upgraded to a 56k modem, then cable through my TV cable company.

At first it was I the one calling the kids for help.

But it didn’t take long before I was upgrading the processor and memory, then building a new computer from scratch. I bought a seat of AutoCAD, and Photoshop.

Then it was the kids calling me for help with their computers.

Since then I have built five machines, two with dual head video cards, one for CAD  work, one for photography work. One of the single display machines I use for digitizing my vinyl record collection.

A friend said my computer room looks like a display at Best Buy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Racer X
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