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EMC240Z

Which engine/tranny for restore 240Z

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Hello Z family,

Hope all is well!!  I’m new to the forum and look forward to some great input from the SMEs. I’ve own a 260, 280zx and just recently purchased a 1973 240z to restore. I have the opportunity to either keep the original engine/4 spd manual tranny or replace with a 280zx turbo and 5 spd manual tranny?  What would be your recommendation?  Also, what do you think the estimate cost will be for a the overhaul of the engine. I have someone to do the tranny but may have to reach out to a shop for rebuild. Any Z specialist close to lower Alabama? Thanks!!

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Welcome to the forum,  well you should keep the original engine/4spd regardless of what you do.  You or the next owner may decide to go back to bone stock and you can't do that without the numbers matching engine.

The 280ZXT is a potent engine and the 5th gear is much nicer for Hwy driving but it might be worth your while to get the car running with the 2.4L engine and see how that feels to you.  It 's a fairly high revving engine and lots of fun to wind it up and with the car being so light it is a well matched package.

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Granny knot,

Thanks for the suggestion. I’m thinking the same thing. I know the zx turbo will give more power but like you said, with the car being light, it should be enough power for what I need, as well as having matching numbers helps with future sales.  Look forward to more conversation!!

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What's an SME?

Swapping a turbo engine in is more complicated than it seems.  It's an EFI engine so you'll need all of the electronics and wiring and injectors and other odd electrical parts, plus you have to be good with electrical troubleshooting, because of the age of the parts.  Or you can get an aftermarket EFI system, but still, electrical knowledge is needed.  It's a different world from carbs. 

And, as site's sites shows, the turbo 5 speed is not a bolt-in swap, like the NA 5 speeds are.  It needs a crossmember and a different propeller shaft (length).  More cost, more work.

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6 hours ago, Dave WM said:

subject matter experts

Yes sir!! I appreciate the advice. This is my first restores and limited experience. I have some assistance but the person isn’t very comfortable with all the specifics in 240zs. The simpler we keep it, the better. I will probably hold on to the turbo/5 spd for a later project. Thanks all for input. I’m pretty sure I will reach out for more. Once we get started, I will post some pics.

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Hi. Welcome. So, I assume the original engine is in the car now. Why are you going to rebuild it? Do you have compression numbers? Does it run? 

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JonathanRussell,

Thanks for the feedback.  Good question!  The engine is original.  I will do a compression check.  So we are working on getting the engine running.  The reason I asked about a rebuild is once we drop the engine and tranny, I want to have both overhauled/serviced so when we finish with everything else, I don't want to have to do anything major to the engine/trans.  If that means a rebuild, that will be the time to do it.  Makes sense?

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