duffymahoney

Duffy's 1/71 Series 1 240z build

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Got the front coilovers basically put togther, I wish I would have zinc'd the calipers, they have a lot of area with no powder coating and will rust.  But they sure look good, and I don't plan on driving it in the rain. 

 

This is a stupid question, but to adjust height on the car I have to unbolt the top correct?  Old timer at the machine shop doesn't like any of the powder, he thinks it on the face of these hubs is a bad idea.  

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22 hours ago, duffymahoney said:

Old timer at the machine shop doesn't like any of the powder, he thinks it on the face of these hubs is a bad idea.  

I agree with your old timer. Same situation as the U-joint yokes to me. I think you are putting an indeterminate, movable squishy plastic surface in an area where it is important to have a predictable hard determinate surface.

Does that make me an old timer as well?   :D

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48 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

I agree with your old timer. Same situation as the U-joint yokes to me. I think you are putting an indeterminate, movable squishy plastic surface in an area where it is important to have a predictable hard determinate surface.

Does that make me an old timer as well?   :D

No, but i would way rather bolt to powder then rust.  I think if I could go back I would zinc bolting surfaces.  Got the first coilover in.  I used their flange nuts and it tore up the paint in the engine bay, I think I will use stock hardware with them.  

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That is what I do for basic alignment, just measure tire to tire at front and back of tire.  Suspension must be settled.  Your adjustment should be half of what is measured or difference from desired setting.  Sometimes I measure from a tread groove and sometimes I put a chalk line down the center.  Easier to hook a tape measure on a tread groove.

BTW, I think the old timer was correct as well.  Might want to consider removing the powder coat from the face of the hub.  If you are worried about rust, just smear a light coat of anti-sieze or grease on the face of the hub...very light.  My guess is that the powder coat is going to stick to the back of the wheel and come off in chucks eventually...then it may even be more problematic.  But, I could be wrong.  Hope you report back on that one.

Edited by David F

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7 minutes ago, David F said:

That is what I do for basic alignment, just measure tire to tire at front and back of tire.  Suspension must be settled.  Your adjustment should be half of what is measured or difference from desired setting.  Sometimes I measure from a tread groove and sometimes I put a chalk line down the center.  Easier to hook a tape measure on a tread groove.

BTW, I think the old timer was correct as well.  Might want to consider removing the powder coat from the face of the hub.  If you are worried about rust, just smear a light coat of anti-sieze or grease on the face of the hub...very light.  My guess is that the powder coat is going to stick to the back of the wheel and come off in chucks eventually...then it may even be more problematic.  But, I could be wrong.  Hope you report back on that one.

That's was my plan for alignment.

 

It's funny about the powder or paint on all of this,  it's very 50/50 on peoples opinions.  Some people are very very against it, then I talk with high end build shops/ race shops (icon, nicks trixs and 2 nascar teams) they all say it's perfectly fine, no issues to worry about.  I trust the high end shops/ race shops more then the average user on facebook or here.  I'm also not the first person to do this, lots and lots of people have powder coated/ painted them on lots of vehicles with zero issues and companies offer it as part of a package.  If I was to do it over, I would zinc the faces and the mating surfaces.  But that would fail pretty quickly.  Zinc isn't that strong.  Bolts and nuts are what hold everything together, not metal to metal or rust to rust or powder to paint.  If I take a wheel off at some point and find the powder failing and turning to chalk I will remove it all, but I have a feeling it will look perfectly normal.    

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Duffy, I really like what you're doing with the car.  I have also seen and read your posts on Facebook, as well.  Did you mention the size of your new tires?  I would like to know what they are.

Thanks,

Gary

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3 hours ago, Freez74 said:

Duffy, I really like what you're doing with the car.  I have also seen and read your posts on Facebook, as well.  Did you mention the size of your new tires?  I would like to know what they are.

Thanks,

Gary

Sometimes I think I am doing the strangest build.  Cleaning up everything but the paint:) The paint is like a 6 out of 10.  Good from afar but far from good.  I just have been burned too many times in the painting process.  Too long, too much money etc.. I just want to enjoy and actually drive one of my cars.  

 

Tires are a 205/55-15 DUNLOP DIREZZA on ROTA WHEELS RKR 15X8 +0 4X114.3.  Here is my inspiration.  

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Duffy, you may totally right on the hub paint debate, please don’t take my comment as critisim.  Also, I totally understand your approach with this car and I am doing basically the same thing.   Your doing a great job.  

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40 minutes ago, David F said:

Duffy, you may totally right on the hub paint debate, please don’t take my comment as critisim.  Also, I totally understand your approach with this car and I am doing basically the same thing.   Your doing a great job.  

Criticism is a good thing.  I don't know that much about cars and learn from mistakes.  No worries:)

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I think that it depends on the type of coating.  If you've looked at the factory half-shaft flanges you'll see that they're painted by Nissan, on the mating surface.  I've scraped a few clean when chunks started coming off, to be sure the surface was flat and consistent.  The Nissan paint might be a two part thermosetting type of paint (I've never tested it for solubility - something to do), which won't melt and flow when hot, or creep under pressure.  Paint from a spray can would be a solvent-based paint, which will melt and flow under heat and flow slowly (creep) under load.

Be aware that there are thermoset and thermoplastic powder coatings.  Two different types.  The key is knowing what the properties of your powder coat are after curing.  Epoxies will be thermoset and probably fine, nylons will be thermoplastic and maybe not so good.

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20 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

I think that it depends on the type of coating.  If you've looked at the factory half-shaft flanges you'll see that they're painted by Nissan, on the mating surface.  I've scraped a few clean when chunks started coming off, to be sure the surface was flat and consistent.  The Nissan paint might be a two part thermosetting type of paint (I've never tested it for solubility - something to do), which won't melt and flow when hot, or creep under pressure.  Paint from a spray can would be a solvent-based paint, which will melt and flow under heat and flow slowly (creep) under load.

Be aware that there are thermoset and thermoplastic powder coatings.  Two different types.  The key is knowing what the properties of your powder coat are after curing.  Epoxies will be thermoset and probably fine, nylons will be thermoplastic and maybe not so good.

Now that is a scientific answer.  They are cardinal powder which says epoxy for the colors I use.  I am also not bolting powder to powder on anything.  Powder to aluminum, powder to raw or powder to 2 part paint.  

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1 minute ago, Zed Head said:

Just went and checked one.  The paint is soluble in MEK.  But it's very thin.

Most of my paint was basically intact.  I bet they did it to prevent rusting.  Most paint is pretty thin, mine was as thick as a few coats of rattle can.  

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One reason not to do the wheel hub flanges is because they see much higher flexing loads.  Side to side.  And the lever arm of a wheel is much longer than the half-shaft flange.  The half-shaft flanges only see rotational forces, for the most part, the side loads are just pulling or pushing the shaft longer or shorter.  Tiny compared to the wheel loads.

This topic came up a week or two ago and somebody told a story about their trailer wheel falling off because the painted flange let the lug nuts loosen up.

I wouldn't paint mine.  If you've ever had a wheel fall off once, you'll avoid a future occurrence at all costs.

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18 hours ago, duffymahoney said:

Sometimes I think I am doing the strangest build.  Cleaning up everything but the paint:) The paint is like a 6 out of 10.  Good from afar but far from good.  I just have been burned too many times in the painting process.  Too long, too much money etc.. I just want to enjoy and actually drive one of my cars.  

 

Tires are a 205/55-15 DUNLOP DIREZZA on ROTA WHEELS RKR 15X8 +0 4X114.3.  Here is my inspiration.  

 

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That looks like the perfect wheel/tire/suspension combo to me, thanks!

Edited by Freez74

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I got talked out of my powder coating on these parts after spending so many hours masking off and detailing them. 

So then I had to burn the old powder off. Glass beaded them and then hours of wire wheel polishing. Now off to zinc. Should look awesome with the gold zinc and the powder coated bodies and BC coil overs in the similar gold.

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I like the look of zinc coated suspension parts. Just keep in mind that there is hydrogen embrittelment, that's why you usually can't by high strenght bolts with zinc coating.

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That might be right.  However, if high grade bolts have to be zinc plated they get an aftertreatment (baking) plus additives in the plating bath. As long as your plater knows all this you should be fine :)

BTW your detailing looks really awesome! 

 

Edited by german240
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