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Parts Wanted: 1977 Datsun 280z Clock Wanted

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The clock in my 260z didn't work when I purchased it two years ago and I went through two DOA e-bay clocks before trying to fix it myself.

What I did was remove the back to see what makes it tick. I then determined that my clock used an electric motor to "wind" it, then it ran using a main spring. I sprayed it down with contact cleaner and put a drop of clock oil on every pivot point and plugged it in. It has been working ever since.

I might of gotten lucky.

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6 hours ago, Jeff Berk said:

The clock in my 260z didn't work when I purchased it two years ago and I went through two DOA e-bay clocks before trying to fix it myself.

What I did was remove the back to see what makes it tick. I then determined that my clock used an electric motor to "wind" it, then it ran using a main spring. I sprayed it down with contact cleaner and put a drop of clock oil on every pivot point and plugged it in. It has been working ever since.

I might of gotten lucky.

@Jeff Berk - I think you got lucky. Somewhere on this site, @zclocks advised against using any oil in the clock mechanism, sorry I can't provide you the direct link to the write up.

I'll try using the contact cleaner on my spares.

Hopefully zclocks can add his link for all to benefit.

Took me a few minutes to find, but here's the link >

 

Edited by wal280z
edit in bold

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If you're still looking, I'll go through my stash. I have a few working clocks but I think they're mostly from earlies. '77-'78 are pretty rare here. I do have a working original '78 Quartz clock but I don't know that I want to give that up...

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Thanks for posting my article. I've attached a photo of a random 240 clock , which is the one that Jeff has, and this is what causes most the 240 clocks to stop. I have worked on many 240 clocks over the years and it's always the same thing. If you add oil this is what you will end up with.

If you try to clean things in place you can't do a very good job and you will damage parts. There are plastic parts in the clock (some plastic motors in later 240 clocks) which can be attached by several cleaners. I use only IPA (alcohol) which does a good job, but you need to scrub the parts to get the gunk off . 

The 280 clocks have a completely different design which uses plastic gears against metal. If you oil on these parts you can degrade the plastic over time. There is nothing in this clock that needs be oiled. The 2 main rotating components are metal against nylon. Nylon is self lubricating and it shouldn't be oiled . Again this clock mechanism needs to be disassembled and cleaned, not oiled. The main failure of the 280 mechanical clock is the circuit board. I do repair these and sell them on my web site. 

Anyone can usually repair either of these 2 clocks, it just takes time and patience or you can send it to me.

Just my 2c.....Ron

 

PS: The first photo is the 240 clock and the second is the 280 clock

 

 

 

240 clk 0il.gif

280-clk-mec.gif

Edited by zclocks
clarify the clock mechanisms
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