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motorman7

Deja Vu: 1971 Restoration

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               So I cleaned up the rear shock towers and got one completely assembled.  Will finish the second tomorrow.  The old shock was stuck in the strut and was a challenge to get out.  The picture is a bit blurry, but I held the shock is my vise and put my slide hammer on the other end.  I ended up pounding on the slide hammer with a 4 lb hammer.  I soaked the strut in PB Blaster and Kroll for a couple hours.  Eventually I heated up the strut and pounded the strut off.  There was a lot of rust on the shock.

     I got the brake and fuel lines back from the plater and got those installed.  Will tackle the rear suspension tomorrow.   Pics are below

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Got more of the rear suspension in.  Also have a before and after pic here.  Should be able to get the differential in tomorrow.  

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The honest answer is 'trial and error'.   The brake lines need to go in first and then the emergency brake parts since they are sandwiched between the differential and the floor pan/tunnel.   It is hard to access these with the diff in place.  The strut towers help to align the lower control arms.   I will install the diff with the lower mount and bracket pre-assembled and lift it into place using a scissors jack, after inserting the two studs on the diff into the mustache bar.  Then I will put in the diff strap.  Will put the diff strap brackets in before I put in the diff assembly.  Will do strap after diff is in.

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Got a lot of items installed tonight.  Yesterdays prep work was a big help.  Got the hand brake and linkage installed.  Also put in the diff strap brackets and hardware.  Then I lifted the differential assembly onto the mustache bar  using my handy scissors jack.  Then installed the bolts for the forward diff bracket.  Got the half shafts installed as well.  I threw the tires on just for safety.  Jack stands are great, but you never know.  (Side note: The red jack in the pics isn't touching anything on the underside.  It is there just in case.  Living in SoCal,  I always have this strange fear that we might have an earth quake so extra support is always welcomed)

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Looks fantastic!

Make sure you do your tightening of all the suspension bushings with the suspension loaded. I did my rear bushing tightening with the rear tires up on moving dollies. That allowed the rear wheels to squirm around into correct position while still allowing enough room underneath for me to get under there and work wrenches.

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Ooops. Looks like you're right. For some reason I thought this was an original style rubber bushing job. With the poly, it doesn't matter.

So nevermind me. Carry on.  LOL  Thanks Dave!

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regardless of bushing type, you should always do a bolt check after a few hundred miles. 
after installing poly bushings on the front and rear of my z31, the bolts definitely loosened up after a week of driving around.

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Not knowing any better I reused the nuts after installing new poly/rubber combo. One of the TC rods fell out of the hole and was dragging on my driveway. Thank goodness I heard it and didn't get on the road. Also all the pieces were in my driveway so I put it back on then took the advice of Zkars and "double nutted" both sides. The OE nuts are one use type. You could also use nylon lock nuts.

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5 hours ago, siteunseen said:

Not knowing any better I reused the nuts after installing new poly/rubber combo. One of the TC rods fell out of the hole and was dragging on my driveway. Thank goodness I heard it and didn't get on the road. Also all the pieces were in my driveway so I put it back on then took the advice of Zkars and "double nutted" both sides. The OE nuts are one use type. You could also use nylon lock nuts.

yeah, the P.T. or Cone-lock nuts are deemed non-reversible, and thus non-reusable if removed... Jam-nuts or nylocks are a much better replacement.

 

Thouuuuuuuuuuuuugh I usually test the PT nuts for larger threads like that by using a stubby wrench. If it's very hard to turn with my palm as the only way to make use of what little leverage there is, I'll reuse them.

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On 9/27/2017 at 12:31 PM, Careless said:

regardless of bushing type, you should always do a bolt check after a few hundred miles. 
after installing poly bushings on the front and rear of my z31, the bolts definitely loosened up after a week of driving around.

Good words of advice.  I will have to monitor that.

Did some work on the rear brakes.  Got the passenger side drum brakes cleaned and installed.  Installed proportioning valve, splitter and a few break lines.  Camera pics are terrible and it is all lighting (or the camera, or the photographer) .  Will try and get some better pics in the daylight tomorrow.

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Finished rear brake line install.  Now working on engine bay brake lines.  Installed brake line manifold and fuel vent manifold.  I threw in a before pic just for reference.

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Thanks!

Got the transmission cleaned up and installed.  I have the transmission mount in and the forward end supported with a scissors jack.  I should be able to drop the motor in here soon once I can scrape together a couple hours.  I bought the Exedy (made in Japan) clutch kit which included the clutch, pressure plate, throw-out bearing and pilot bushing.  Very reasonable from Rock Auto.  

Also added the before picture which was posted earlier.

Also had some nice light for the rear end pics.  I love how that came out.  

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2 hours ago, joe newsom said:

Transmission turned out great. How did you get it to look so shiny :)

Hi Joe,

   Pretty much the old fashioned way.  I used paint thinner and a parts brush (for crevices) and a wire brush to remove all of the oil.  I would clean an area with the brushes and then wipe clean with a towel paper.  I think I went through about half a roll of towel paper by the time I was finished.  That part took about almost an hour.  At this point the transmission is clean, but still fairly grayish.  I then took wire wheels and attached them to my drill and used that to pretty things up and make it shiny.  After that, I put on a thin coat of high temp gloss clear. 

I was tempted to use aluminum paint, but that can chip and also looks too 'uniform' which looks funny to me.    Bare metal typically has a little character to it.

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Got clutch and pressure plate installed.  Also installed the motor.  Things should move along nicely now.

I picked up four rims today and have about 8 hubcaps to sort through for the wheels.  We are going stock with hubcaps for the final set-up.  I will drop the rims off at the powdercoaters next week.  Should be able to post some pics of the hubcaps in the next day or two.

Radiator has been re-cored and is ready for pick-up.  I will get that on Monday and should be able to install that day.  Some pics are below.

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Very nice work, lots of details... :beer:

It's Always a pity it's going to fade away anyhow, when used outside on the road, or else you have to put it in a museum or only drive on dry sunny days

But you can keep it nice for a long while, old fashioned elbow grease.

 

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Got the  steering rod cleaned up and installed with new bushing.  Also got he rims and hubcaps.  Thanks @Montezuma!

 

Should be able to get radiator in tomorrow and carbs and exhaust manifold 'officially' installed.

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Got the exhaust and intake manifold installed.  Threw on the air cleaner just for pics.  Picked up the radiator from the repair shop and attached it, but not very happy with the radiator shop paint job.  Will probably remove it and clean up some of the drips and solder remnants, then re-paint.  Will have to get some of Jay's braided hose and some nice wire clamps next.   Will also get the master cylinder and clutch master in shortly, then I think I will be ready for the fenders.  Pics below.

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