xray

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About xray

  • Rank
    Sportscars FTW!

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  • Map Location
    Raleigh NC
  • Occupation
    Radiologist

My Cars

  • About my Cars
    1972 240Z HLS30-81167

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  1. Got them off EBay in 2006 from a guy who frequently travels to Japan. Not sure when/if any more will come available, so keep an eye on EBay. Some folks here are in process of making replicas, so stay tuned.

    I don't frquent this site often anymore, sorry I took so long to reply.

  2. xray,

    I saw your pics of the yellow 240. I love the headlight covers but cant find any with chrome like yours. Do you know if they are still available.

    Thanks

  3. $16,100 is way undervalued from how the car shows in pics. Maybe it's the recession, maybe it's just well bought, but I think it should've been sold for more. Hope it's just a fluke.....
  4. These are dated 9/75, but are the same size as those from 1973. 5Jx14. I bought them a few years back from the original owner, who after buying his new 280Z immediately dismounted the steelies for some aftermarket wheels. $100 plus shipping, if interested. I don't need them because I ran across a date-correct set for my 1972.
  5. I don't think the trans weighs 140lbs, as I have easily moved them around during my resto...maybe 75lbs or so. Honestly they feel like they weigh less than the differential does. Hope the shipping isn't too much!
  6. RB, Adding fuel at the level of the filter does not answer the question as to whether your fuel rail between pump and carbs is clear, at least that's how I read your reply. Not too common for those to get clogged, but it's possible. When you say your carbs are "dry" does that mean you checked the float bowls and there is no fuel? I've not heard of the fuel pump lobe on the cam going bad, but if everything else doesn't fix it, then.....
  7. I advocated buying the FelPro gasket. I don't care where you buy it. The link from JLPurcell offers the same gasket for the same price, from a different website. FelPro gaskets work very well--much better than straight cork.
  8. That is so NOT a Hofmeister kink...The C-pillar is straight, with an upturning of the lower edge of the rear quarter window, similar to the S30. H's kink is the inverse where the C-pillar turns downward to meet a straight "shoulder" edge of the rear quarter window.
  9. shorter, lighter, more powerful...more design elements from the S30. Much improved I'd say. Still not used to the lights, but if it performs like it should, that's be a small issue to overcome.
  10. (raises glass) Glad to hear it's fixed!
  11. Sorry to be off topic....I've had very good success with FelPro's rubber/cork valve cover gasket. Their oil pan gasket also does a much better job than the basic cork as well. Prices at RockAuto are $10 for the valve cover, $7 for the oilpan. So, if the neoprene doesn't pan out, maybe try that one?
  12. If you move up to a bigger wheel size, consider the added weight of the rim and tire. More unsprung weight is bad for handling. There are not an unlimited list of choices for 14" tires, but enough to keep you happy. Remember, the tire technology currently available far outstrips the technology from 30 years ago, so almost any good to above average summer performance tire will do (the S30 is not a performance dynamo in stock configuration.) I concur with what Mr Coffey said. 195/60 R14s for track. Good performance, good grip, less expensive, lighter, and dropping your AR to 60 will effectively improve your final drive ratio for some extra pep off the line.
  13. Both intake and exhuast valves are closed throughout the compression and power stroke, not simply only at TDC. TDC on compression can really be best determined by positively identifying the #1 piston at the top of its stroke when both valves are closed. The easiest way to figure this out is to place a thin wire through the #1 spark plug hole and rotate the engine by hand (rather, by socket wrench on the crankshaft bolt) When you feel the wire deflect with both #1 cam lobes pointing up/away, you're at TDC on compression. Because of the deteriorating rubber ring in your crank pulley, those marks may or may not correspond to anything, so don't trust them. Once you've determined TDC #1 on compression, paint a small white spot on your crank pulley where your timing pointer directs. That is 0 degrees, regardless of the tick marks on your crank pulley. Static advance is 7 degrees BTDC (IIRC), so adjust your distributor accordingly.
  14. Yes. With the engine in the car, I've only been able to do it efficiently as a two-man job. Take off the distributor--you should see the tang, representing the top of the spindle. Use vice grips to secure the tang and keep it from falling off through the timing cover when the oil pump is removed. Take off the oil pump. Doublecheck the photos I pointed you too, to be certain the beveled edge of the tang is oriented correctly as well as the overall direction of the tang. It's easiest to move the spindle gear from below, so have a friend move it while you check its position from the distributor side against the photos (obviously, remove the vice grips prior to repositioning.) be careful, and get it exactly right. Off one tooth, and it'll still not run well. It takes some adjustment and trial-and-error, but you'll get it right eventually!
  15. The rotor looks out of position if that's #1 TDC, should face more toward 7:30ish. Check your spindle tang orientation. Reasonable reference photos (post #22) can be found here http://classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28449&highlight=distributor+spindle As you can see, I've been in a similar situation.