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jfa.series1

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About jfa.series1


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  • Title: Just Another Jim


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jfa.series1 last won the day on June 13

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  • Map Location
    Richardson TX
  • Occupation
    Retired from retail information technology

My Cars

  • Zcars Owned
    240z
  • About my Cars
    Original owner of HLS30-15320, 12/1970. Complete restoration with mild customizations completed September 2011.

Zcar VIN Registry

  • Zcar 1 VIN
    HLS30-15320

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  1. In the ZCCA "Stock" class the cars are judged on how well they represent the original factory appearance and equipment as it rolled out of the factory. If the valve cover is your only change, you can take a chance in the Stock class knowing you will give up points for that item. The first round judges are usually not that harsh as many of them are actually other owners with only limited judging experience. The advantage of electing the "Street Modified" class is that the judging switches to not so much "what" you have done but rather "how well" it has been done. Attention to detail and cleanliness are the deciding factors at this point. The first round judging decides all of the class awards and "Best ..." awards. For first round cars finishing with 290 or more points, it is the second round judging that really gets crazy intense. All of the judges will be very experienced in prior ZCCA events and they will be ruthless for the Gold Medallion and Gold Cup contenders. Good luck and have fun at the big dance!
  2. It might be the back side of the ignition switch that handles the electrical components. It is all plastic and wears out over the years. Easily replaced.
  3. In stock and cheaper at Courtesy Parts. https://www.courtesyparts.com/oem-parts/nissan-strap-80950e4100
  4. Just to get you started, here are your aftermarket stock front control arm bushings - same as for a 240Z: https://www.autozone.com/suspension-steering-tire-and-wheel/control-arm-bushing-front/p/rare-parts-control-arm-bushing-15753/863605_0_0
  5. I was able to buy it new from Nissan a few months ago, complete with the chrome caps.
  6. The rubber bushings in your suspension and steering provide compliance - the ability to absorb shocks transmitted from the road. Going to polyurethane or similar materials eliminates the compliance benefit and allows road shocks to be carried directly into the body and steering wheel. That also allows a lot more noise into the cabin. Poly is great for a track car, not so much for a driver street car. And... yes your car has a steering rack. As for replacement shocks, KYB makes a great shock with stock-like qualities. Look up your suspension bushing part numbers on the online catalog and see if any are still available from your Nissan dealer. Then got to Rockauto and try to fill in the gaps. It is difficult to impossible to get OE rubber bushings for most steering racks - pretty much unicorns, so it is a good chance poly will be your only option there. If you come across any Beck-Arnley rubber bushings, grab them as they are an excellent product.
  7. That sounds like jute in your seatback, likely added as a flexible filler for comfort since the basic foam is there to provide shape but not flexibility. I recommend you leave it out but do consider adding some 1/2' - 3/4" upholstery foam as a replacement. I did that to the seat back and bottom, and the side bolsters. It made for a decided improvment in comfort. The additional foam in the side bolsters also helps push out any wrinkles that might be in new covers.
  8. View Advert 240Z Tail Light Panels Complete 3-piece set of restored 240Z tail light panels. The factory primer on the back sides is in very good condition. It has been cleaned, lightly wet sanded, and topped with a matte clear coat to preserve its authenticity. The stainless steel bezels are excellent, no dings or other damage and have been polished to a mirror shine. The front sides have been refinished in the correct OE grey. The set is $350 including standard domestic shipping. Payment via PayPal, PM if interested. Thanks. Advertiser jfa.series1 Date 06/05/2022 Price $350 Category Parts for Sale  
  9. This advert is COMPLETED!

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Complete 3-piece set of restored 240Z tail light panels. The factory primer on the back sides is in very good condition. It has been cleaned, lightly wet sanded, and topped with a matte clear coat to preserve its authenticity. The stainless steel bezels are excellent, no dings or other damage and have been polished to a mirror shine. The front sides have been refinished in the correct OE grey. The set is $350 including standard domestic shipping. Payment via PayPal, PM if interested. Thanks.

    $350

  10. I was working on the comboi light switch from VIN #1818, 02/70, and noted a couple of weak design issues that were later eliminated. The first is the method of indexing the main plastic barrel to the frame with a small tab on the barrel that fits into a small recess on the frame. The plastic tab was long gone on this car and the PO had substituted a tiny piece of wire and a cut off straight pin, both jammed into the plastic to provide the index. I located suitable donor material in the form of a long dead BIC lighter, cut a piece from the body and notched the barrel to receive the transplant. The transplant was glued into place and then trimmed to fit the frame recess. All later model switches I have worked on reversed this design to provide a raised boss on the frame to fit into a notch on the plastic barrel. The second design item I found is the use of a jumper wire to route power from the light switch over to the wiper switch, later replaced with a dedicated power wire in the wiring harness.
  11. Referring back to the link I provided, the OE antenna had two power wires - one to raise it, one to lower it. The antenna was self-grounded to the car body via the mounting bracket. The antenna switch had three wires - one is power into the switch from the dash harness. The other two were routed back to the antenna. There are no other switches or wires in a stock set-up. The up and down action of the antenna was controlled only by the switch, independent of the radio power on or off.
  12. I have a HItachi AM/FM unit from a 280Z and the antenna switch is located on the top right of the chassis with a toggle that protrudes thru the faceplate. Here's a pic of two radios I picked up some time ago - a 240Z AM radio on top and the 280Z AM/FM radio under it.
  13. This recent thread might help you with understanding the switch and antenna wiring:
  14. While reviewing @zed2's thread on unchained vs. chained gas caps I spotted @26th-Z's comment about undated supercedes on that item. I recalled seeing a similar catalog notation on door lock assemblies while recently doing research for a friend. Today I was cleaning up some door lock assemblies and spotted a unicorn the probably confirms the timing of this particular supercede (80501-E4100, undated supercede 80503-E4100). The lock on the left is a left side unit, date coded 9 - 7, it has two clock-style coil springs, Note the position of the long arm is down on the smaller spring. The unit on the right is also a left side unit, date coded 9 - 11. It has only one clock-style spring with a different shape and positioning. The other major change is the elimination of the clock-style spring for the primary latch in favor of a tubular coil spring. This type spring is on all later dated units I have. Differences in the pin stamps can be seen in the second pic. Another difference I spotted: internal bumpers for the various levers were clear plastic on the early unit, black plastic or rubber on the later units. Unfortunately I have only the one 9 - 7 unit, no matching right side.
  15. I've recently picked up some parts taken off of VIN # 1818, a 2/70 car being parted out by a fellow forum member. Can someone please help me with the date codes on the door strikers? Thanks in advance!
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