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Wheel bearing noise


Dave WM

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Time to get a slide hammer and possibly an air hammer. On the passenger side of my 260Z, I was working the slide hammer while my friend was getting the other side with an air hammer. It finally cooperated.

Oh, and I suggest not using the 280Z for a long distance drive again until after it has been addressed.

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7 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

Yeah, that doesn't sound good. I don't think I would toss up as much of an urgent "don't go on any long trips" as SteveJ did, but you should get to that in the near future.

Many people (including myself) have switched over to the ZX style nuts for the stub axles. Photo courtesy of Blue:
83 ZX nuts.jpg

Is there any change in the fitment process, are the final torque figures the same as 240 or 280zx FSM?

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As for the fitment, the only change I can come up with is that you don't need to stake those ZX nuts after installation. The prevailing torque distorted threads do that for you.

As for the torque, I'm no expert, but I would just torque them to the same torque as the original spec for the Z. You would lose a tiny bit of the torque number due to the friction of the distorted threads, but I bet it's such a small percentage of the total that it wouldn't be significant.

I've got a ZX manual around here somewhere. When I get a chance, I'll dig up the torque spec they used in there.

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Don't overlook that the torque range is wide (probably) because it's an adjustment range.  Torque to the minimum number then measure end play and preload.  If it's not right go a little tighter.  If you get all the way to 239 and things still aren't right there's probably a problem.

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removed the old 27mm nut. I did NOT uncaulk it per fsm term I presume for stake) I seemed like  a pita to do and I tend to go with the FSM recommendations.

my technique was to use a 1/2 breaker bar on the nut, with the wheel back on the hub lower the car off the jackstands and roll it backwards. the break bar jambs into the control arm, locking the nut, rolling backwards unscrewed the hub threads. works great. I check the thread by seeing if I could re attach the nut, no problem. The treaded part of the thinned nut where the stake is just bent open.

So now I await the arrival of the slide hammer from mr amazon.

The plan is to install the bearing into the hub pressing on the outer races with some sockets and all thread to do the pulling. this is after applying grease to the areas per the FSM (the sealed outer bearing from Nissan already had some grease there but I would like to have a bit more.

I will make sure I don't over pack the center section and make sure the inner race are clear of grease so as to not cause any possible hydro lock (if possible doubt it) when the entire assembly is preloaded back with the nut. then the new seal.

To install the axle the plan is to put it in the freezer overnight, put a 100 watt light bulb near the hub (but not so hot as to have melted grease get everywhere just enough to heat up the bearings to about 90f, hopefully that will allow for a light slip fit of the axle into the bearings.

The FSM was not real helpful on the assembly just reverse the removal. if I followed that literally it showed the outer bearing installed on the axle shaft (guess it stays on during removal).

reversal would be to press on the outer bearing inner race on to the stub axle then insert the stub axle/bearing into the hub. I don't know how to do without pressing on the inner race to press into the hub, that would stress the balls and races.

So hopefully my process of installing bearing in hub the axle slip into bears will work.

 

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well  that turned into a cluster REAL FAST. the issue as the dang grease seal. it was not coming out, normally I can pop them out with out resorting to a "seal puller tool" guess I was wrong about that. anyway I was beginning to question the whole idea of trying to do this on my back so I went ahead and pulled the spindle pin and removed the entire strut assembly. I was finally able to get the seal out with a slide hammer and drywall screw after several attempts. from there. I stub axle was removed before pulling the strut with a slide hammer, a couple good wacks and it was out.

I drove out the inner bearing using the cast in notches in the housing, a bearing puller was used on the outer bearing (it stayed with the stub axle). Since I had the strut out I used the press to install the bearings and new grease seal after lubing up all the needed spots.  So now the stub axle with no bearings on it is in the freezer for the night. the 100 watt bulb is gently heating up the housing, I will check on it later to maker sure its not cooking out the grease by getting too hot.

if all goes well I will hopefully drop in the stub axle, at least far in enough to get a shot at fitting the splines of the companion flange lined up. From there I will press on the companion flange and the outer side of the hub where the wheel studs are installed. if it does not get that far I will just have to hunt up some pipe that will let me press on the inner race of the inner bearing until I can get enough of the shaft thru the bearings to engage the companion flange. I am trying to make sure that the pressure to pull the axle shaft into preload position is all done with out any pressure to the balls or races of the bearing.

 

Edited by Dave WM
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I will post up some video of the old bearing later, it does make some odd noises like a vibration when spun (still has the old grease in it, I know better to spin a dry bearing).

the stub axle went in as well as could be hope for. all night in the freezer, then a space heater on the hub (not too hot of course, prob about 110f), it dropped right thru the 1st bearing and with some light hand pressure it popped thru the second. So now on to tighten up process I will reinstall the tire and with the flat on the ground will use the new torque wrench to factory spec.

After that I will be on familiar ground (reinstall the assembled strut). The other side I think I will just start with the strut removal.

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its all back together, MUCH quieter, posting up a video now. will have to see if any miles on it effect things but right now there is NO noise and NO slop (top bottom shake) at all. Very pleased with the outcome, but the garage is a disaster zone. I always seem to have way more tools out laying around than I need. Guess that is the sign of diy vs a pro on general repair. I backed the car out so I can do a compete cleanup. Part of the issue is the way I have things stash in place due to limited room. I would like to think if I had a bigger shop with roll around tool chest ect.. it would not get so out of hand.

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Seconded. Nice work.

So I once went through all the gyrations to never put force through the bearing balls to put everything together. Then I discovered that I had way overgreased the cavity and had to take it apart again anyway to pull most of the grease out. And there just isn't any way to take that thing apart without putting force through the balls.

In the end, I decided that they had designed it such that there was a mild press fit to get things together and it was designed such that the amount of force required to press the stub into place isn't enough to damage the bearings. So I just started doing it the way the manual says to do it. You know... The easy way.

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it went pretty easy but for the seal. I may try the other side with the strut in place IF I can get that darn seal out. The frozen axle went in easy, prob a indication of how mild the press fit really is.

the biggest expense on tools was the 250lb torque wrench, I was fully prepared to tighten to a MF'r tight, but opted to go for a more precise way. I will be using it again when I pull the damper off to get the timing cover off to address the persistent coolant leak, so needed it anyway. It also makes torque the wheel nuts easier. larger handle and better feel.

New bearings coming for the other side so will get to it in a week or so depending on work (busy time).

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Before replacement I had a whine that sorta sounded kinda like a diff whine coming from that location but did not change as power was applied just seemed to follow speed. (I could hear it and when turned my ear towards the right rear it was louder). this is what got me to looking at it in the 1st place, that and the age, just thinking about 45 year old grease had me worried. The whine was not very loud, but it was noticeable.

Todays test ride had no whine anymore, so maybe I hit the cause with the bearing replacement.

Edited by Dave WM
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