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Home Built by Jeff

Home Built Z 'Full video build'

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Q:Jeff "Return line?"

A:  Return line allows for better cooling of fuel.  Fresh cool fuel from the tank will always be present and available.  This is not needed but you may suffer a little heat soak starts on hot days.  I recommend running dead head at first and modify to use the return in the future if you have heat soak problems.

 

Here are some common fuel routings:

BRE 1970 with individual FPR for each carb /they lost in 1969  (AARC) due to fuel starvation so this was knee-jerk belts and braces reaction).

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BRE Racer 2018

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240z Triple Weber Deadhead

engine photo.jpg

 

BILD0312.jpgDSCF0642.JPG

Image1.jpg

IMG_0961.jpgP5140001.jpgP6090074 (1024x768).jpg

 

USING RETURN

 

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Edited by 240260280
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6 hours ago, 240260280 said:

 

 

 

BILD0312.jpgDSCF0642.JPG

 

What are these fuel rails? Are they made from a factory rail or sourced some other way?

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8 hours ago, Home Built by Jeff said:
This week I finish up the Toyota big brake upgrade on the 680g. 

Some posters on the youtube channel pointed out that you have the bleed valves on the bottom, for the "upgrade".  The calipers are interchangeable, side to side.  Pretty common mistake.  You'll never get all of the air out with them that way, the air bubble is at the top. 

From 12:39 in the video.  Bleeding from the bottom.

image.png

p.s. the weight difference over stock is 1.7 pounds, for just the calipers.  

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Also Jeff, the part you refer to as the proportioning valve  below the master cylinder is actually a brake failure switch. It will light the brake light on the dash if you have a circuit failure. The proportioning valve for the 240z is in the rear of the car. It is a small brass part that acts as a tee connector for the two rear brake drum lines. If you add a hand valve remove the stock proportioning valve in the rear of the car.

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11 hours ago, 240260280 said:

 

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That is some great information. I have a K&N fuel pump I am installing that makes 4-7psi, so I will need to order a fuel pressure regulator to go with it. I will aim to set it up something like the picture above.

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@Patcon Here is a triple install with stock carb fuel rail

image.png

The one you pointed out (below) may be a modified stock EFI fuel rail

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Here is a stock fuel rail. It looks like the above fuel rail may be cobbled from new piping and the front stand-off brackets from the stock rail:

P1070306.JPG

 

Edited by 240260280
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It's a nice clean looking rail, although it might still have some heat issues, but it looks nice.

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@Patcon@240260280  Have you never seen the factory triple-outlet fuel pipe before?

17520-E4620 was offered as a Nissan Sports/Race Option part pretty much from the beginning, and is still available today.

Here's an example from 1971:

KuVagz.jpg

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This is an older photo of my kit that came with the same fuel pipe. The copper tubing is grafted to the end of this pipe and goes to the fuel return line.

In my case the triple pipe is flipped to be fed from the rear as my tank line is routed to the firewall instead of the stock front location.

el1.9-30-6cr.jpg

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6 hours ago, HS30-H said:

@Patcon@240260280  Have you never seen the factory triple-outlet fuel pipe before?

17520-E4620 was offered as a Nissan Sports/Race Option part pretty much from the beginning, and is still available today.

Here's an example from 1971:

KuVagz.jpg

I hadn't ever seen it. It is a nice clean solution and appears to have no return line provided.

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On 12/29/2018 at 5:14 AM, 240260280 said:

btw a fuel pressure from 2.5psi to 3.5psi is fine. Don't go over 4psi or it may overwhelm the floats ability to hold it back.

@Home Built by JeffA note on the K&N pump you have. I've been running it for over a year now without a pressure regulator on my SU's with no trouble. MSA sells this pump and says that you don't need a regulator with it.

https://www.thezstore.com/page/TZS/PROD/classic17a09/11-3078

The pump isn't exactly what I'd call quiet, but with my 6to1 headers, 2.5" exhaust with

https://www.magnaflow.com/products?partNumber=10426

as a resonator and

https://www.magnaflow.com/products?partNumber=13216

for the muffler you can't hear it once the motor is started.

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1 hour ago, w3wilkes said:

@Home Built by JeffA note on the K&N pump you have. I've been running it for over a year now without a pressure regulator on my SU's with no trouble. MSA sells this pump and says that you don't need a regulator with it.

I am installing the pump today and that video will be out tonight. Are you running yours with a return or not? I have ordered a regulator anyway, so wee will see how it all comes together.

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I do run the return. When it's cold out and the car is cold I will turn on the ignition so the pump will pressurize the system, say maybe 5 - 10 seconds. Makes the car easier to start. Don't know how cold you get there in July - August, but here today's hi was -1.11C (30* F). We do occasionally get 7.2 - 12.7C (45 - 55*F) December - March that are good driving days. I would still have to crank 2 to 5 seconds to fire. Don't know if the 3 deuces are easier / the same / or harder to start in the cold. 

3 deuces is a term from a song by Ronny and the Daytona's called "Little GTO" back in 1964 about the first Pontiac GTO's that had 3 2 barrel carby's. The GTO was pretty much what started the American muscle cars through the rest of the 60's and into the 70's until the oil embargo when they fell out of favor due to mileage and then pollution control requirements. What a fun time to grow up.

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Dear jeff, don't worry about the return right now, if you can make it it work, great, if not no sweat.

Fuel pressure should be kept bellow 5psi, 3.5 for the street is more then required. go ahead and try it without the reg, Manufacturers do not always "tell the truth" a 6 psi pump can easily translate to 4 psi in real life.

You will have more then a fun time tuning it for the street, good luck with that. Hoping for you it will not be an (overly) costly project.

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3 hours ago, 240260280 said:

@HS30-H @kats

Hi Guys,

Is there a Mikuni-optimized fuel rail?  The one below seems to have the 3 ports aligned with the Weber inlets (trailing throat) rather than the Mikuni (leading port)?

image.png

Since Mikuni-Solex PHH carbs came in top-inlet, right hand side-inlet and left hand side-inlet form depending on exact model, the factory E4620 triple carb fuel supply tube might be considered universal...

The 40PHH carbs in the above photo (that's my G.P. Maroon Fairlady 240ZG) were originally part of a period Sanyo Kiki 'Sanyo Sports Kit',  and I simply added curved soft fuel lines to join up with the triple carb rail. Works perfectly well.

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On 12/29/2018 at 5:26 AM, Home Built by Jeff said:
This week I finish up the Toyota big brake upgrade on the 680g.
 
 

I guess I missed something along the way.  Why do you call it the "680g"?

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11 minutes ago, wheee! said:

24 ounces = 680 grams

240Z = 680g

Isn't Australia on a different standard?  Imperial maybe?  Then metric.  I get 675.  Or 750, depending on source.  Weird.  Cleverness gone awry.

https://www.nisbets.com.au/conversioncharts  3 x 8  = 240, 3 x 225 = 675

https://www.taste.com.au/healthy/articles/weights-measurement-charts/vnepuhic#cup  3 x 8 = 240, 3 x 250 = 750

 

Looks like Jeff used the US conversion - https://www.digikey.com/en/resources/conversion-calculators/conversion-calculator-weight

Found this while I was looking around.  Kind of funny, but not really.  https://www.nist.gov/

image.png

 

 

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52 minutes ago, wheee! said:

24 ounces = 680 grams

240Z = 680g

 

Ok, I get it now.  It just made me scratch my head every time he called it the 680.

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8 minutes ago, jonbill said:

Imperial and US ounce are the same I think. Wiki agrees https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ounce I think we just deviate on how many ounces are in larger units like pints and gallons.
An ounce is 28.3 g, so 24oz is 679.2g

Could have used Troy.  I still have memories of the US attempt to go metric.

https://www.ebay.com.au/gds/How-many-Grams-in-1-ounce-When-Selling-Gold-Tips-/10000000003240520/g.html

The table in your link was interesting.  Alrighty, back to building the 24 Oz.

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