wheee!

1976 280Z Restoration Project

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    So continuing the mirror adaptation, I decided to JBWeld the washers and nuts to the reinforcement plates. This way I can just slide the plate in place and tighten down the bolts. 
     

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    Then I fibreglas reinforced behind the old mounting holes and fibreglassed over the top as well. On top of that was the fine filler and sanded smooth. 
     

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    This matches nicely to the other side. 
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    Optical illusion if you think the holes are spaced different. Just camera angle and hole size. 

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    Finally have the rear hatch panel smoothed out through the complex radius along the length. Yeesh.

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    An image company owns the original artwork of the rising sun on a stained linen background. I purchased the individual rights to print it for my particular application. Anyone can purchase the rights to use the image based on their individual needs. Cost is based on use and distribution etc. As this was for a vehicle wrap, hidden 98% of the time and not used for commercial profit etc it was relatively cheap.
    As a photographer (a previous lifetime ago), I have no issue paying for someone’s artwork.
    *I do not claim to own the image rights of the rising sun graphic, just the specific application of it on the stained linen background. I do not have copyright or any restriction stopping someone from buying the same image and using it the same way. I would just hope that people would respect the individualism I have created in my car.

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    6 minutes ago, wheee! said:

    An image company owns the original artwork of the rising sun on a stained linen background. I purchased the individual rights to print it for my particular application. Anyone can purchase the rights to use the image based on their individual needs. Cost is based on use and distribution etc. As this was for a vehicle wrap, hidden 98% of the time and not used for commercial profit etc it was relatively cheap.
    As a photographer (a previous lifetime ago), I have no issue paying for someone’s artwork.
    *I do not claim to own the image rights of the rising sun graphic, just the specific application of it on the stained linen background. I do not have copyright or any restriction stopping someone from buying the same image and using it the same way. I would just hope that people would respect the individualism I have created in my car.

    Ok, I've always wondered about licensing etc.  I make art too and can appreciate that you did the right thing, I'm sure you could have just found an image and printed it.  Good job though, and I can appreciate those individual touches.  I always assumed it was super expensive, which is why people steal images and use them illegally, but it sounds like it depends on the situation and application.

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    Oh look! Progress....
    The door panel was badly damaged and the fine amount of finessing it back to flat is a slow process. The quarter panel weld joins are fairly straight forward.

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    Move along, nothing to see here...

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    Hours and hours of sanding off all the filler I put on.... the door is finally flat through the main part. Just the top edge and the handle area to finish out. 
    The gap at the fender and door kept me awake so I carefully filled the edge with short strand fibreglas. Surprisingly tuff as I tested it’s strength and couldn’t snap it off by hand. I guess we’ll see how it holds up! 

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    Well, those of you looking for interesting updates are going to be disappointed. I have been working on the passenger door for a couple weeks. It is finally straight and true. Well at least the middle and top sections! The bottom edge is next. This truly is a glacial process...


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    As most have you may have noticed, I tend to post a lot. Not just the “wins” but the warts as well. After weeks of body work it’s fair to say that I am paying the price for being so poor at metalwork and repairs. People like [mention]disepyon [/mention] and [mention]ConVerTT [/mention] make it look so easy and perfect! Oh well. Home built not bought is the mantra so here are a few examples.

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    Due to the sheer quantity of welds and repairs to the heavily “fixed” body of this car, there is going to be a fair amount of body filler in places. No pretending to have perfect sheet metal here. I’m okay with this as the rust is gone, the welds are good and the body work will hide these imperfections. Purists may judge me and reduce the value of my car, but as it will never be for sale, who cares? It will look great in the end and I will be happy.
    Welcome to my journey, mind the potholes!

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    I really believe these cars are much harder to make perfect without substantial filler than many cars of a similar era. The metal is much thinner than American cars of the era. So on an heavy thick bodied muscle car you can get the metal close and then use a body file to remove some of the unevenness. This make the metal thinner in some spots but reduces the need for filler. Add to that, the fact that the original stampings were not perfect. Which means blocking an original door flat is going to require some filler since the original door was never blocked. It was stamped, primed and painted.

    Modern fillers work really well and if they are applied in layers they tolerate movement pretty well. You have done good prep work, so it should hold up for a long time. I suspect like on many of the panels on my car, there appears to be a lot of filler but in reality it is a very thin layer spread over a wide area.

    Keep up the good work! i wish I was making this kind of progress! :blush:

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    8 hours ago, wheee! said:

    Due to the sheer quantity of welds and repairs to the heavily “fixed” body of this car, there is going to be a fair amount of body filler in places. No pretending to have perfect sheet metal here.

    We can't all  afford or get the opportunity to purchase a perfect example as our starting point,  but I believe bringing back a neglected or abused Z is a much greater achievement than starting with a cream puff.

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    Thanks guys! I appreciate the feedback. I know everyone prefers a “clean” car but here in the frozen north, so many of these cars have simply rotted away. Salvaging this car has been a challenge that I probably wouldn’t have started knowing what I do now.... but where’s the fun in that?
    I’ll be glad when it’s done. Then I’ll look at the roadster....

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    It is a huge amount of work.  But it is already paying off.  You'll end up with a beautiful car that makes you happy.  That's all that matters.  And don't worry about over-posting.  These updates are very informative to those of us who aspire to your skill level.

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    On 2/13/2020 at 3:09 PM, wheee! said:

    Good grief, don’t aspire to my level! Shoot higher!!!

    Don't underestimate yourself. You are doing a lot better than you think.

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    10 minutes ago, EuroDat said:

    Don't underestimate yourself. You are doing a lot better than you think.

    Thanks Chas. I'm not looking for praise or "fishing for likes" as such. I know I am doing a good job, but the difference is that someone with better skills and equipment would have been able to reduce the amount of filler being used or replaced the panels completely. I am running out of a) time b) money c) patience with finishing this build. I am in wayyyyy deeper than I ever expected. In the end I know the car will have flaws, but they will be ones that I know about. Ones that tell a story of how decisions were made, whether good or bad. I suppose I am tempering peoples expectations of the finished product; showing the flaws and warts along the way so the build is not a "fluff story of perfect fabrication"! People tend to post pictures of their success versus their failures lol!  In the end, if the car is an 8/10, I will be happy.

     

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    Mark, Re: Flaws...When Navajo women weave their beautiful blankets they purposely put in a "flaw" to let any evil spirits out. Now you know that there will be NO evil spirits in your amazing build. Can't wait to see and hear this incredible project get "completed".

    Cheers, Mike

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    There is no perfect. Those cars come out of factories and aren’t perfect in reality. Your car will be a reflection of you, your efforts, your sweat. That makes it special in my opinion. Keep it up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    A little fender bling...

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    I really like the direction of your build and I commend your dedication to bringing this Z back to life in the Great White North.
    Where did you source the cool katakana Z emblems? Are they metal or ABS plastic? I love these!

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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    They’re from DPAN on the web. (Datsun Parts and Needs). Plastic but well done. Overall I have decided to avoid the 280Z badging due to the fact this car will be a mix of S30 variants plus a 3100cc engine. A stock Fairlady badge seems to offend the purists too much so this is a nice compromise.

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