JLPurcell

Antenna Rebuild / Restore

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    Here is my spare mast, I do not know it is HARADA or AFM one. The tip is pointing, looks exactly the same as original mast. 

    We have a short and a long mast , my orange 240Z 12/71 has a short one while my Fairlady 240ZG 06/72 has a long one.

    How about yours ?

    Please see the pictures, 

    Kats

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    6 minutes ago, kats said:

    Hi, I wrote an message to HARADA Ltd customers relationship, about a request of the antenna mast replacement. I do not know they will reply , I am waiting hearing from them.

    Kats

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    Thanks Kats. That would help out a lot of members. 

     

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    6 minutes ago, kats said:

    Here is my spare mast, I do not know it is HARADA or AFM one. The tip is pointing, looks exactly the same as original mast. 

    We have a short and a long mast , my orange 240Z 12/71 has a short one while my Fairlady 240ZG 06/72 has a long one.

    How about yours ?

    Please see the pictures, 

    Kats

    19F04FFE-F372-4F82-B211-050F3260814A.jpeg

    D0EDB320-8DA5-462E-A4E7-A6696105E67A.jpeg

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    9274DB1F-DB9B-4138-8A3E-3D7A1AC895F9.jpeg

    Kats, the one I am restoring is a long 5 piece mast, I believe that my 72 has the long mast as well. I found a NOS mast for my car in 2011 out of England. It would be great to have reproduction pointed tip replacement mast. Thanks again for your attempt to make this happen. JLP

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    I thought a few before and after pictures of this latest antenna restoration might be nice. I media blasted the aluminium case with walnut shells polished the used mast, blasted wire brushed and plated the yellow zinc parts. I put together all of the best bits and pieces and put it all back together. A chrome cap for the ball and restore a retainer nut and cap, this project will be finished and on it's way back to the owner.  

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    Fantastic , Jerry .

    I hope people in HARADA see this thread and feel our passion for these parts to enjoy our Zs.

    Kats

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    Sorry I may be posting off topic, I show you a manual extension antenna which would be  an alternative choice for someone who doesn’t try to repair his auto antenna.

    This is for Fairlady Z (std) and export 240Zs which do not have an auto antenna.

    I may mixed up associated parts which are used for an auto antenna .

    It may not have a rubber ball , it might come with a die cast scallop ? piece.

    Kats

     

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    Hi Kats,

    This is a picture of the manual antenna showing the emblem on the round metal piece and another photo of the original Nissan key.

    -Mike

     

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    Mike B, what a great news you have a rare one and a super rarer Nissan key !!

    I too have a Hitachi mark on the metal piece, I think it should go with manual extension antenna as I see your original antenna.

    I found the black plastic ring which is in between the Hitachi piece and the top rock nut is smaller than the one on the auto antenna.

    Kats

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    Edited by kats
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    Hi Kats,

    Yes, I recall seeing you post the photo of your antenna with the Hitachi mark on the metal piece, but I had never seen one on a North American market 240Z.  The S30-S I posted the photo of is the only other one I have seen with the mark, so it makes sense it would be from the S model manual antenna.

    -Mike

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    Interesting. I got an early electric 240Z antenna a couple years ago and it has the Hitachi Mark.

     

    Sent from my [device_name] using http://Classic Zcar Club mobile

     

     

     

     

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    Rubber bits from Steve Nixon for the antenna restoration arrived today!

    Here they are shown with the finisher nut I am using as a test.

    Left top is the finisher nut cone---beneath is the demo'ed finisher nut and the nut lower seal.

    To the right is the upper "plastic" ball, the mast assembly to body seal and, finally the inside quarter panel lower rubber ball.

    The parts are very accurately produced---another testament to Steve's skills!  :)

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    This photo shows the parts in assembled order.

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    You will notice there is a gap between the shoulder of the cone and the upper surface of the finisher nut.

    More on that this weekend, as we try to complete an installation process for a proper fit.

    Stay tuned.......

     

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    Rubber bits from Steve Nixon for the antenna restoration arrived today!
    Here they are shown with the finisher nut I am using as a test.
    Left top is the finisher nut cone---beneath is the demo'ed finisher nut and the nut lower seal.
    To the right is the upper "plastic" ball, the mast assembly to body seal and, finally the inside quarter panel lower rubber ball.
    The parts are very accurately produced---another testament to Steve's skills!  default_smile.png
    DSC00959.thumb.JPG.e6889564fb15fa75fd7d60696dbf49d7.JPG
     
     
     
    This photo shows the parts in assembled order.
    assembly.thumb.jpg.824f50b5c9978434d9d0cb1dde33b784.jpg
    You will notice there is a gap between the shoulder of the cone and the upper surface of the finisher nut.
    More on that this weekend, as we try to complete an installation process for a proper fit.
    Stay tuned.......
     
    Great work. Look forward to these being available for purchase.

    Sent from my [device_name] using http://Classic Zcar Club mobile

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    12 hours ago, Zup said:

    Rubber bits from Steve Nixon for the antenna restoration arrived today!

    Here they are shown with the finisher nut I am using as a test.

    Left top is the finisher nut cone---beneath is the demo'ed finisher nut and the nut lower seal.

    To the right is the upper "plastic" ball, the mast assembly to body seal and, finally the inside quarter panel lower rubber ball.

    The parts are very accurately produced---another testament to Steve's skills!  :)

    DSC00959.JPG

     

     

     

    This photo shows the parts in assembled order.

    assembly.jpg

    You will notice there is a gap between the shoulder of the cone and the upper surface of the finisher nut.

    More on that this weekend, as we try to complete an installation process for a proper fit.

    Stay tuned.......

     

    12 hours ago, Galaxybj said:

    Great work. Look forward to these being available for purchase.

    Sent from my [device_name] using http://Classic Zcar Club mobile
     

    Zup, I noticed that the brass piece is removed from the retainer nut prior to the plastic cap being installed. I believe that the brass piece is a ground for the antenna mast necessary for reception. Any thoughts on that? Thank Jerry Purcell

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    2 hours ago, JLPurcell said:

    Zup, I noticed that the brass piece is removed from the retainer nut prior to the plastic cap being installed. I believe that the brass piece is a ground for the antenna mast necessary for reception. Any thoughts on that? Thank Jerry Purcell

    The Brass "fingers" must be installed in the finisher nut for a proper fit. There must be zero left over plastic from the old top in the finisher nut or on the brass "fingers".  The lower lip on the new top is paper thin but it must be like this for the correct fit. 

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    So not an electrical grounding necessity, but instead just a mechanical positioner for the mast ?

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    9 minutes ago, Namerow said:

    So not an electrical grounding necessity

    I am of the opinion that @Namerow is on to it.

    I'll try to clear some of this up tomorrow morning.

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    The aluminum housing of the antenna assembly should be electrically grounded to the body. And the extendable antenna (mast) portion must be electrically isolated from the "ground" of the body while being connected to the center prong on the co-ax cable on the interior of the car.

    It's been so long since I've been inside one of those things that I don't remember the brass finger things, but if they slide along the mast, they're probably there to help insure electrical connection.

    Edited by Captain Obvious
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    2 hours ago, Captain Obvious said:

    The aluminum housing of the antenna assembly should be electrically grounded to the body. And the extendable antenna (mast) portion must be electrically isolated from the "ground" of the body while being connected to the center prong on the co-ax cable on the interior of the car.

    It's been so long since I've been inside one of those things that I don't remember the brass finger things, but if they slide along the mast, they're probably there to help insure electrical connection.

    In looking at the design of the antenna I believe that this is correct. The connection to the mast has to be through the housing of the mast and the "brass fingers" would serve that purpose, through the retainer nut to the brass threads which are isolated from the body of the antenna. The antenna cable is connected to the brass threads that the retainer nut attaches to. I am not 100% sure of this, but it makes since when you look at the design of the antenna. 

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    I have got a reply from HARADA , but it seems to me almost impossible to get a replacement mast.

    They said first of all , they can not supply parts to individual customers, they can do only for car manufacturers like Nissan. 

    They said ‘maybe we can react / move on if Nissan place an order to us ,but Nissan has to specify the parts number of the mast and tell it to us when placing an order’ 

    So, I now think to make it happen, 

    #1 many people want the mast ( hundreds or thousands?)

    #2 Nissan thinks replacement mast will make a profit 

    #3 We and/or Nissan know the part number of the mast

    #4 HARADA still have tools and materials to make it 

    It’s just a long way to the mast if you wanna Rock and roll .

    I visited my mother’s house , the outside was minus 10 degrees Celsius, I decided not operate the antenna. 

    Kats

    By the way, were  there quite a number of people who tried to bend the antenna ? A gas lid too, why Fairlady Zs have key- locked lid ? Was Japan unsafe at that time or Fairlady  Zs were too good for those people and  they were jealous so badly ?

     

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    Edited by kats

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    Kats do you think fostering would work. Their product was great look how long it lasted most of them I came across the motors still work with cleaning. Only parts that took heavy weather conditions didn't last.

    Sent from my [device_name] using http://Classic Zcar Club mobile

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    If the information is true that Nissan is planning to begin supplying parts for restoration of the Z car and Skyline this may be a part to contact them and request replacement parts, such as this that as good as some are at reproducing some parts this one is not one that can be independently re-manufactured. 

    Edited by JLPurcell
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    13 hours ago, Zup said:

    I am of the opinion that @Namerow is on to it.

    I'll try to clear some of this up tomorrow morning.

    Or maybe the brass fingers are provided as insurance re electrical contact between the mast and brass tube..

    • the finisher nut with the brass fingers screws onto the top of the brass tube
    • the antenna cable connects to the brass tube
    • the antenna mast slides up and down inside the brass tube
    • the brass tube is electrically isolated from the aluminum housing

    The fit between the brass tube's ID and the antenna mast's OD is somewhat loose, so I suppose that the electrical contact between the mast and the tube could become erratic if the mast starts to vibrate in the airstream when the car is at speed.  The little brass fingers would ensure that the radio doesn't receive a jumpy signal.

    Or maybe the fingers are there to mechanically centre the mast elements as the come up out of the brass tube and then keep them from vibrating in the airstream.  The extra electrical contact could be just an unintended bonus (although the use of brass makes me think that there really is an electrical purpose at work here).

    FWIW, only three of the brass fingers remained on the finisher nut of my antenna and even they were pretty mangled, so I just broke them off. I tested for electrical continuity between the mast and the cable before I installed the antenna in the car and it was fine. The mast didsn't seem too wobbly when it was fully extended.  We'll see how things work when I finally get the car running and out on the road.

    Edited by Namerow
    New ideas added

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    Everything @Namerow said above is true.

    With the finisher nut completely removed there is signal which did not, in my experience, break-up or become static-y.

    For those that have "missing antenna nut fingers" take heart----your antenna will function without them.

    After an extended drive at varying speeds and over rough roads, the "fingerless" nut reception sounded completely normal.

    I agree with Namerow that the "fingers" in the finisher served more than one purpose.

    They help give durability to the plastic cone material as it would withstand side flexing better, would assure another electrical contact, as well as center the mast.

    Attached are a couple of photos of the innards of the mast section showing the  typical copper or brass "spring fingers" which slide along each section as the mast telescopes in and out which maintains signal continuity.

     

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    Next are a couple of photos showing the cleaned finisher nut where ALL remnants if the plastic cone have been removed from the groove in the nut. (sorry for the photos---not easy to get a clear image--)

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    Next are photos of an original finisher nut on the left- and on the right, Steve's finisher cone dry fitted to the nut---it fits perfectly with only a very slight undersize to the diameter of the groove---

    Steve's cone is made from a modern plastic and should last a long time. The profile is slightly different from the original, but it is quite close.  The robust thickness should help with durability as well.

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    More to come once Jim Smirlies arrives today to assist----:)

     

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    So ---- to remove the fingers from the nut---

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    Our old friend Mr. Heat, visegrips to hold the nut and needle nose pliers to remove the "fingers". The small screwdriver is to clean the groove in the nut of the torched plastic that remains once the "fingers" have been extracted.

    Heat the nut until the plastic starts bubbling and give the "fingers" a tug with the small pliers--it will come right out. Stringy bits of melted plastic too. Hold the "fingers" in the flame again and it will burn off all the remaining plastic.

    Repeatedly heat the nut and scrape away the molten plastic from the groove until it is all removed.

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    Squeeze out a gob of black weather strip cement. Using your small screwdriver or a toothpick, twirl up the cement and apply it to the groove.

    Place the "fingers" on the end of your pinky and insert it into the plastic cone. Check to make sure that it is centered and carefully place the nut over and apply light pressure as you confirm that the fingers and the cone are fitting into the groove without being off center or deformed. This might take a stab or two to get right--- but no worries--just back up and go through the steps again without applying any more cement. It will still be sticky enough to seal the cone.

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    Finished assembly---not as beautiful as Jerry's  truly restored pieces, but it is what I had on hand to demonstrate

    Many Thanks! to Steve Nixon for the opportunity to do this

    His rubber bits will help restore your antenna to a long life of operation and pleasing appearance.

     

     

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