Jump to content

IGNORED

The old Weber/choke question


Recommended Posts

I was rooting around in the old threads here in the forum and came across more than one post that said that, for the most part, you really don't need to choke Weber carbs. The entries were from a few years back and I was wondering if that is still the consensus.

Also, if anyone has a '73 240z with triple Webers, I'd be interested to see how you've got the choke cable hooked-up.

Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking for Mikuni carbs... For years, I ran without using the "choke." About a week before the crash, I hooked up a choke cable to the trio. "Why did I wait so long to try this?" Starting is considerably easier, the engine smooths out immediately with nary a hiccup. You'll just have to try it yourself to see if you experience the difference I discovered.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do it. Fires up like a modern EFI car. Photos on the way.

Aluminum stock, bike brake cable, and a few little things.

P1080250-L.jpg

[ATTACH=CONFIG]52658[/ATTACH]

P1080244-XL.jpg

Edited by cygnusx1
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I needed the chokes when I lived in Washington State - you'll be glad you have the chokes hooked up if you stay in Ohio. Here in Florida there was no need for them.

FWIW,

Carl B.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 10 months later...

Hi,

I just finished hooking up the choke to Triple Weber DCOE 40's and thought I'd share it with you:

Frist, please note I used the idea/picture from cygnusx1 as posted earlier - give credit where it's do!!

I bought a $0.30 piece of aluminum: 3'' x 1" x 1/4" which I cut to shape and then dry sanded to 1500.

I drilled out the pivot hole vertically to 5/16" and the two cable holes to 1/8" horizontally.

I used a 20.5" length of steel braided aviation cable to hook up the choke levers.

To attach the choke levers I used 6mm bolts drilled out 1/8" to accept the braided cable.

I secured both cables (the longer of the two original choke cables and the braided cable) to the bell crank lever with brass electrical connectors.

The shorter original choke cable was ligated under the 2nd and 3rd Weber - both out of the way and out of sight.

As is, the choke works with about the same degree of pull on the choke lever as withpost-28265-14150822918894_thumb.jpg the twin SU's

Regards,

George

post-28265-14150822917224_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822917506_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822917704_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822917921_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822918086_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822918249_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822918409_thumb.jpg

post-28265-1415082291857_thumb.jpg

post-28265-14150822918733_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Siteunseen,

I suspect that you will have to configure something similar to what I posted. The reason being that the Weber chokes open in the opposite direction from the SU's, and, as such, the two original cables are too short to accommodate the 180 degree bend the outer Webers require.

An alternative would be to remove the two original cables and replace them with one long cable (10') which you could feed through the firewall then under the three carbs up and around to top of the front side of the 1st carb. If this is of interest, there is a post by, 'Lazeum' on the hybrid Z site titled ' Weber DCOE40 18 Info Needed'

Cheers,

George

Link to post
Share on other sites

I set up the chokes in the 80's so the drawings I made of the parts are long gone.

I couldn’t tie the stock choke levers directly together with a cable because the cable would interfere with the throttle linkage at full throttle. So, I extended the choke levers on the carbs to get them high enough to clear everything. I tied the 3 chokes together with a stainless rod and made 3 small metal blocks that act as clamps on the rod and also pivot points for the choke lever extensions. To reverse the action of the cable, I tied the outer jacket of the cable to the moving arm with a metal sleeve with a set screw that clamped the cable jacket and acted as the pivot and then attached the center cable to a fixed point on the carb.

I hope you can look at the pictures and make sense of what I have written.

If anyone is really it interested I will take it apart and take more pictures and make some measurements.

post-20445-14150822951354_thumb.jpg

post-20445-14150822952331_thumb.jpg

post-20445-14150822952925_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dr 240Z. it looks like the way you set up the chokes is actual a lot less moving parts. one pivot and a few cables. Looks like a nice setup to me.

Thanks for the good words. I love to work on my Z and I really enjoy this web site. I have learned a lot from everyones input and hope I have helped one or two people too. Theres alot of old cars here on Long island but not many 240Z's. This site has been great help.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Hi,

Although it's only +2 F degrees here this morning I'm getting anxious to crank up the L30. It's been hibernating inside my garage at 55F since October and I'm not very sure just how to go about this. I don't want to flood it.

My question is: With the triple Weber DCOE 40's do you suggest I use my recently installed choke or do I pump the throttle a few times before rolling it over?

Cheers,

George

Link to post
Share on other sites

Activate the starter circuits (aka choke). Pump the pedal two or three times, and turn the key. Once the idle stabilizes (10-20 seconds after it fires) roll the choke lever off slowly, and keep it alive with the pedal. If it floods, crank it over with the choke lever off, and the pedal wide open.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would pull plugs and crank for ~ 1min. or more to get oil into the head and to build up oil pressure.

Look through the oil cap hole for oil lubricating the cam.

Start engine only after oil is reaching the head.

Edited by Blue
Link to post
Share on other sites
I would pull plugs and crank for ~ 1min. or more to get oil into the head and to build up oil pressure.

Look through the oil cap hole for oil lubricating the cam.

Start engine only after oil is reaching the head.

Thanks, Blue...I'll do that...won't be today as the temp and wind combine to make a chill factor of only +2F...seems like January!

Cheers,

George

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.