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BD240Z

Dash Repair Process/Pictures

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This is in my future so a couple of quick questions.

1. Hazmat asked about primer but I didn't see an answer. What are you guys using for primer?

2. I'm assuming the texture is different enought that the full dash needs coating?

3. Is everyone clearcoating afterwards? I'm not sure I'd like a shine to the dash.

Thanks!

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I used a cone shape stone in my dremel. Thats what the guy recommended when I called to order the dash repair stuff. It gave a good controllable cut. Make sure you go past the end of cracks and round them to make it a little less likely to crack. I used a DA on very slow speed to sand the urethane supply padded dash filler. This stuff is way too rubbery, it takes a while to knock it down by hand if you get it too thick, which I did. Still can't understand why people use something to fix bumpers on dashes when there is something made for specifically repairing dashes. Urethane supply recommended a flat or satin vinyl paint to topcoat it with if you wanted to coat it for some extra UV protection. They said a high gloss coat may give you a lot of glare depending on the car.

Edited by socorob

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Good question! This brings up another question. Should the final coat of the dash be the same color of the other trim areas. For example if I paint the dash in Landau black should I paint all the interior in the same color?

Thanks

Larry

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I'm just about to start restoring my dash with the methods from this thread but I'm wondering because my cracks are so shallow, can I go straight to filling them with body glaze or should I still fill them with foam or bumper filler?

Thanks,

Chris

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Use a Dremel and cut up under the dash cover into the foam like this \ , instead of a straight up and down cut.   This will help with the filler from lifting.  You only want a very thin layer of Sem bumper filler. When you sand the repair ,tape off around the repair so you dont sand into the good parts of the dash.

 

Steve

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Suggest you experiment with the SEM Bumper-Bite product before getting anywhere close to your dash with it.  The set-up time is very short (well under a minute, in my experience), so you'll only get about 30 s. to mix and apply before it starts to get granular and won't spread/fill properly.  I experimented with different mixes of catalyst:filler and found no change in the set-up time.  I ended up working with very small batches ( ~ 1/2" of filler, ~ 1/4" of catalyst).  Tedious, but the only way I found that would work.  To maximize your apply time window, mix quickly with the same flex-blade applicator that you'll use to apply the filler to the dash.

 

To reinforce Steve's comments about keeping the SEM layer thin, try this as an experiment:  Apply a 1/8" thick layer of Bumper-Bite to a piece of a cereal box.  Let it set up, then bend the boxboard.  If you get the same results I did, you'll find that Bumper-Bite is only slightly flexible.  Better than Bondo, I'm sure, but not flexible like a sheet of polyethylene plastic.

 

Finish-sanding the Z dash is a real challenge, because contours are both convex and concave, and run in multiple directions.  I found the contoured sanding blocks sold by Eastwood ('Dura-Block'?) to be perfect for the job (including the instrumend pod recesses, where I had chipped-out sections that needed repair).  The SEM product sands very nicely, but you'll inevitably get some pinholes -- which the SEM product doesn't work very well on.  I used local applications of Bondo's glazing putty and got good results.

 

Be sure to use eye protection when carving and bevelling the edges of the dash vinyl layer with your Dremel. The cuttings are tiny but very sharp-edged.

 

If you're going to be in the Burlington area, let me know.  My bare, restored dash is still sitting in the basement waiting to be built up and re-installed in the car, so you can have an up-close look at the end result (which I'm quite happy with).

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This is a great thread, with some excellent information.   Although I came across this thread a little late I am very happy I found it.   I just recently began the repair process on my own dash,  i had some pretty large cracks.   

 

I did not use the great stuff,  I wish I did cause it looks a lot faster and friendlier.

 

I used A West System Product,  G flex 655 2 part thickened epoxy, for the whole job, filling the cracks and then the final skim    At my job i am a west system dealer and this is their best product for hard to bond materials, and its about the only  2 part "flexible" epoxy,   it is suppose to expand and contact with the dash. 

 

My repair is almost complete, I still have to block it out and paint!   Fingers crossed it doesn't  crack again!

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This is on the list of fixes for this spring for my '71 240z.

 

Is there a benefit to putting a skim coat of dash repair over a much larger section of the dash (or the whole dash) to ensure uniformity the dash?  I assume that it will require a bit more work, but would it improve the durability of the finished product?  

 

I plan on refurbishing my dash and console (and fuse cover, glove box, etc) at the same time and respraying them with the same texture for consistency.  

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Hey guys, How perfect does the surface have to be before spraying down the SEM texture paint?

 

I was pretty confident with my work , but when i sprayed some rocker panel texture guard (body shop recommended it) , i wasnt too happy as i could see some blemishes. So im going over it again and got a can of sem texture paint this time.

 

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Last pic was when i started to sand it, but shows a few blemishes .

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Can you tell me what steps you used for shallow cracks, where the vinyl has become brittle and cracked but not deep.  Do these areas need to be ground deeper and filled with great stuff or can you just sand and apply bumper repair.

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hard to tell from your pictures if they are small cracks  or something poked small iholes  in dash.

If the hole is cracked all the way around,then I would remove that tiny piece. 

No need for filling with foam on these small ones, foam only for deep wide open cracks.

I would tape off the good surrounding areas around each one or group since you will want to keep as much of the good dash texture as you can.

Sand the area in question for something for the filler to bite into. Clean area well and apply thin layer of filer and let it set up. Sand until it is about level or close to being about right. 

Then remove the tape and do the final feather edge sanding.   

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I am not here to hijack this thread...just do an update on my dash.

I was asked recently to share how my dashed has held up using the Six10 marine epoxy ( The Six10 Marine Epoxy Link: Six10 Introduction )  as surface repair and feathering material when I repaired my dash while still in the car back in 2013.  Now that it is August 2018 ... 5-1/2 years later the dash looks super.    Here are recent pics after I installed a Refurbished Stock Working clock in the dash. 

Note:  My car is in North Carolina and stored in a garage without climate control.  Temps reach 100+ in the summer and as low as 0F in the winter... and no cracks have been observed.   

How to use Six-10 Epoxy: 

Reference this old post from 2013:  

 

Clock 6-14-2018 (1).jpg

Clock 6-14-2018 (4).jpg

Console 2018 - New Clock & Console Restored (2).jpg

Console 2018 - New Clock & Console Restored (3).jpg

Console 2018 - New Clock & Console Restored (4).jpg

Edited by moritz55
Added Instructional Video
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