Jump to content

IGNORED

starter issue, wiring?


Wally

Recommended Posts

Hi all

sorry for being quiet so long. i had some work and family issues. I was able to get the car started. I still have some issues though.

1. it is idled WAY too high. Need some advice on that. have a short video so you can hear it. not sure if its still a timing issue, carb issue or what. 

i cant tell you the RPM bc the gauge isnt working. After a LOT of research i found that the ballast resistor is the likely culprit. i left it attached even 

after i put in the protonix ignition. Still not sure exactly how to correct it but i think this may be issue. 

2. the fusible link on starter. Something is wrong. I keep burning through these. After the video i made starting it the wire burned up again. i took a short 

video showing it and how i have it connected.

3. i also took a short video of the alternator's connection. 

I am really concerned about why the fusible links keep burning up. Not sure where to start to fix issue. Not sure if it matters but i was having a dickens of a time with the timing, distributor, protonoix ignition etc. i finally think i got it all. However, i am not sure if something wrong there could be causing this fuse to burn.

I had someone look at car when i wasnt around. They told me the alternator was pulling 18volts....not sure what that means. Also, i havent checked it out to verify. I upgrade alternator to

https://zcardepot.com/products/alternator-high-amp-80-240z-260z-280z?variant=19280584015985

 

thanks for any help

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Seems like your carbs need adjusting. It looks like the "fast idle screw" has some play (meaning, it's not the forcing the throttle mechanism open), which is good. Maybe just back the throttle adjustment screws on each carb off 1/4 turn at a time until the idle sounds right.

I'm not sure how the ballast resistor could cause a high idle - I think it functioned to allow a hotter spark during start, followed by a somewhat tamer spark for normal running. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, pogden said:

Seems like your carbs need adjusting. It looks like the "fast idle screw" has some play (meaning, it's not the forcing the throttle mechanism open), which is good. Maybe just back the throttle adjustment screws on each carb off 1/4 turn at a time until the idle sounds right.

I'm not sure how the ballast resistor could cause a high idle - I think it functioned to allow a hotter spark during start, followed by a somewhat tamer spark for normal running. 

Close, it was to keep the points from burning up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fusible link diagnostics:

It helps to have a DC clamp ammeter like this: https://www.amazon.com/KAIWEETS-Multimeter-Auto-ranging-Temperature-Capacitance/dp/B07Z398YWF

  1. Test the voltage at the battery with the car off. Record the result.
  2. Test the voltage at the battery with the car running. Record the result. Note: If it is above 15V at idle - there is your problem.
  3. Test the current through the fusible link with the key in ON but car not running. Record the result. Note: If the meter shows a negative value, remove the clamp, face the meter in the opposite direction, and put it back over the fusible link.
  4. Leaving the ammeter around the fusible link, test the current through the fusible link with the car running. Record the result. Note: The polarity of the current should change.

From this we should get a better idea of whether or not @siteunseen is putting you on the right path. If I have time, I'll make a short video to demonstrate.

Setting idle speed: You can buy a multimeter like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002LZU7K or a fancy timing light like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EVU8J8 (Yes, I have both.) You can even find a handheld tachometer, but I haven't used one myself.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, SteveJ said:

Close, it was to keep the points from burning up.

Isn't that what the condenser (capacitor) in the distributor is for?  The ballast is to keep the coil from burning up.  It's the thermomechanical version of "current-limiting" ignition modules.  Kettering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Wally said:

2. the fusible link on starter. Something is wrong. I keep burning through these. After the video i made starting it the wire burned up again.

When, exactly, does it "burn up"?  I remember your past threads.

Does it get hot when you connect the battery, or when you turn the key on, or when you turn the key to Start, or when the engine is running?  I would narrow it down to one of those four, it will tell you a lot.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, SteveJ said:

Fusible link diagnostics:

It helps to have a DC clamp ammeter like this: https://www.amazon.com/KAIWEETS-Multimeter-Auto-ranging-Temperature-Capacitance/dp/B07Z398YWF

  1. Test the voltage at the battery with the car off. Record the result.
  2. Test the voltage at the battery with the car running. Record the result. Note: If it is above 15V at idle - there is your problem.
  3. Test the current through the fusible link with the key in ON but car not running. Record the result. Note: If the meter shows a negative value, remove the clamp, face the meter in the opposite direction, and put it back over the fusible link.
  4. Leaving the ammeter around the fusible link, test the current through the fusible link with the car running. Record the result. Note: The polarity of the current should change.

From this we should get a better idea of whether or not @siteunseen is putting you on the right path. If I have time, I'll make a short video to demonstrate.

Setting idle speed: You can buy a multimeter like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002LZU7K or a fancy timing light like this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EVU8J8 (Yes, I have both.) You can even find a handheld tachometer, but I haven't used one myself.

thanks. i will try to do this but it might take some time

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Zed Head said:

When, exactly, does it "burn up"?  I remember your past threads.

Does it get hot when you connect the battery, or when you turn the key on, or when you turn the key to Start, or when the engine is running?  I would narrow it down to one of those four, it will tell you a lot.

good question. it burns up when turning the key and cranking the engine up

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The starter draws huge current.  It should draw through the main positive cable.  But it also needs a good ground.  Are you sure that the "fusible link" is on the positive side?  Or do you have it connected to the wrong terminal at the starter?  I'll see if I can see it in your video.

Anyway, it sounds like your starter circuit is the problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, pogden said:

Seems like your carbs need adjusting. It looks like the "fast idle screw" has some play (meaning, it's not the forcing the throttle mechanism open), which is good. Maybe just back the throttle adjustment screws on each carb off 1/4 turn at a time until the idle sounds right.

I'm not sure how the ballast resistor could cause a high idle - I think it functioned to allow a hotter spark during start, followed by a somewhat tamer spark for normal running. 

about the ballast resistor, i didn't mean it affects the idling. What i read was if you put in electronic ignition you should eliminate the ballast resistor but if you leave it hooked up their are some crossed signals somewhere that prevents the tachometer from registering activity....that could be all BS but i read that somewhere

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is better.  It looks correct.

Seems like your alternator voltage is not being regulated.  The engine starts and the alternator pumps out too much voltage and current.  the high idle makes it worse.

So, the problem is either in the alternator itself or the wiring to the S terminal at the plug.  I think that this has been discussed before.  The wiring at the plug on the ZCD alternator is still not right.  Maybe you could dig up those old posts about the ZCD alternator wiring.

6 hours ago, Wally said:

I had someone look at car when i wasnt around. They told me the alternator was pulling 18volts

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Yarb said:

@Zed Headwasn’t there an adapter plug for the alternator harness mentioned in an earlier thread from MSA that was required for the higher amperage alternators. Could that possibly be thrown in the mix? Just a thought 

there was. I bought that plug when i got this alternator. So i am using the plug ZCD said too. I likely have something hooked up wrong though. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Zed Head said:

That is better.  It looks correct.

Seems like your alternator voltage is not being regulated.  The engine starts and the alternator pumps out too much voltage and current.  the high idle makes it worse.

So, the problem is either in the alternator itself or the wiring to the S terminal at the plug.  I think that this has been discussed before.  The wiring at the plug on the ZCD alternator is still not right.  Maybe you could dig up those old posts about the ZCD alternator wiring.

 

i agree. something is off with the voltage. Someone told me that this alternator has an internal regulator and thus dont use the OEM one. i bought the voltage blockoff plug...that is in currently. I will get some image or a video uploaded in a day to two. thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.