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starter fusible link


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Shorted and burned the wire soon as i hooked it up. You can see where it burned out. Can anyone see how i hooked it up wrong?

I have the black fusible link right behind the red battery terminal wire. Was i supposed to put it on the other post/nut right next to that one?

 

 

 

 

IMG_2783.jpg

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I would posit that you have a short or improper connection in your wiring harness somewhere. My first suspect would be reversed connections at the alternator.

Do you know how to use a multimeter for resistance readings?

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I dont. I can take an image of the alternator though. Not sure if it helps? One of the nuts toward the bottom was loose. i drew a circle in black around it. 

Maybe this is the culprit. New alternator with the new connector type and i did use the voltage reg blockoff

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IMG_2786.jpg

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It would probably work a lot better with white/red wire mounted to the B terminal.

image.png

With where the wire is currently mounted, you have a dead short when you plug in your fusible link. At least you know what that looks like now. LOL

Don't worry. If you haven't made a bonehead mistake sometime in your life, you're not really working on your car.

 

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Posted (edited)

thanks! i assume this was the issue then. i moved that wire to B terminal like said. 

The item in at top, condensor?, it has a wire with fork on other end. I have left it where it was original with other

wire in black circle. Will that be an issue?

IMG_2784.jpg

Edited by Wally
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4 minutes ago, Wally said:

thanks! i assume this was the issue then. i moved that wire to B terminal like said. 

The item in at top, condensor?, it has a wire with fork on other end. I have left it where it was original with other

wire in black circle. Will that be an issue?

 

The forked lug on the condensor should be connected at the B terminal with the white/red wire.

20211009_192747.jpg

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Posted (edited)

That might be confusing.  There's a forked lug on the condenser case too.  The case of the condenser goes to ground.  The guts get the positive. 

My first experience with positive and negative was when I was installing a radio in my car.  It came with a condenser and I asked my father how it was supposed to be connected.  He is an electronics engineer.  He told me to connect the case to positive and the free wire to ground (pretty pretty pretty sure that's what he said).  It blew the guts out in my face like a firecracker.  Ha ha ha hah.  Had to go all the way to Radio Shack to get a new one.  

 

This thought crossed my mind.  Positive terminals/wires should never ever be connected to the case of anything.  Cases and covers and housings are always ground.

Edited by Zed Head
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Haha!! No, not at all.

Apparently it was popular with most of the British sports cars up through the sixties? I was thinking that maybe you had one of those in the family that your dad worked on a lot. 

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Actually he did have an Austin Healey before he had a family.  Positive ground? 

But he had plenty of good old America iron after that and did all his own maintenance.  I think he was creating a "teaching" moment.

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A friend and I just ran into the oddity of the 1955 Packard using 12 volts and positive ground a few months back on his Packard Patrician. That one threw both of us into confusion until we dug deeper.

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I once helped a young man who was trying to fix his 280ZX after he attempted to jump start his car with his father's Sunbeam Alpine. That young man quickly learned the hazards of connecting jumper cables to ground when one of the cars is positive ground. 

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There are no letters on back of my alternator (at least i dont see any)

Before i cut the wire to add a new larger diameter connector for the B terminal let me make sure i understand. 

1) image 2793, its the "ground" and has 2 wires connected to it, one of which is the condensor body?

2) image 2795 is the wire coming of the condensor (with the fork) it goes to this "B terminal" for total of 2 wires there?

3) This wrong hookup....its likely its what burned up the fusible link on starter?

 

Steve, dont worry, i can 100% guarantee i will make another bonehead move...probably soon too. LOL

IMG_2793.jpg

IMG_2795.jpg

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56 minutes ago, Wally said:

There are no letters on back of my alternator (at least i dont see any)

Before i cut the wire to add a new larger diameter connector for the B terminal let me make sure i understand. 

1) image 2793, its the "ground" and has 2 wires connected to it, one of which is the condensor body?

2) image 2795 is the wire coming of the condensor (with the fork) it goes to this "B terminal" for total of 2 wires there?

3) This wrong hookup....its likely its what burned up the fusible link on starter?

 

Steve, dont worry, i can 100% guarantee i will make another bonehead move...probably soon too. LOL

 

 

  1. The condensor body does not have a wire. It has a metal bracket that bolts to the case of the alternator. In your photo, the ground wire is bolted to the case at the same point.
  2. Yes, the wire coming out of the condensor goes to the B terminal of the alternator along with the white/red wire.
  3. The black wire at the alternator is the ground for the alternator case. When you attached the white/red wire to the alternator case, you grounded it. That wire goes to the ammeter gauge, and there is a white wire on the other side of the ammeter gauge is a white wire. That goes down to the fusible link. I did a simplified diagram below. If the white/red wire is attached to the B terminal, it is not grounded to the case of the alternator.

image.png

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Roger that. will an upgraded alternator cause an issue with the ammeter. I believe the gauge goes up to 45 and the new alternator ideally puts out 70+

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6 hours ago, Wally said:

Roger that. will an upgraded alternator cause an issue with the ammeter. I believe the gauge goes up to 45 and the new alternator ideally puts out 70+

It may put out 70 amps but only if there is a 70amp draw, if your Z is basically stock you won't exceed the 45 setting and if it does it will just peg the needle until the draw changes.

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Wally-your new alternator looks to be the same design as the one I have, from ZCarDepot.

I feel compelled to reiterate this: I also connected the + wire of the car to the ground of the alternator. Luckily, your fusible link worked; on mine, the wire maintained integrity, and burned off the insulation. The rub there: I think it's highly likely I have a short on the +wire to alternator that is hidden in the wire wrap. This seems to be a pretty serious safety hazard, especially if a fusible link doesn't blow. If I were you, knowing you definitely put those wires under a similar duress I put mine under, I'd check the sheathing on your alternator + and ground wires, at least with a DVM. (can anyone report back what an ideal impedance reading would be from battery harness + to alternator wire ground?)

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