motorman7

We're bringin' back the Flat Tops!

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    Looks great! There has been some multi-sided discussion in the past, but I would suggest removing the paint from the metal-to-metal clamped areas. Things like the axle flange faces. And make sure you don't have any paint where the spindle pin slides in.

    So did you put in new wheel bearings? I don't remember seeing that go by.

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    And I keep meaning to tell you... It was great meeting you at Zcon my friend!

    I really enjoyed our discussions and I hope we get another chance to get together in the future!

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    41 minutes ago, Captain Obvious said:

    Looks great! There has been some multi-sided discussion in the past, but I would suggest removing the paint from the metal-to-metal clamped areas. Things like the axle flange faces. And make sure you don't have any paint where the spindle pin slides in.

    So did you put in new wheel bearings? I don't remember seeing that go by.

    Thanks for the feedback. Yes, will remove paint from the axle flange faces and spindle pin area.  I saw that conversation on the Duffy thread (I think).  I will however put a thin film of grease on the interface to help prevent rust on the mating surfaces.  Interesting note: I worked space programs for 15 years and we used to use non-conductive thermal lube when mounting our electronic packages.  It's sole purpose was to prevent corrosion set-up between the mating metal surfaces.  The bolt torque was enough squeeze out the non-conductive lube between the metal surfaces so that you would get a good electrical connection, and the lube prevented corrosion.  Go figure.

    I did not put in new wheel bearings. There was no play in the assembly and everything looked to be in good shape so I left it as is.

    And yes, it was great to meet and talk cars and flat tops in Atlanta!  Hopefully we have many more opportunities in the future.

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    Gaps look great, finish should be super smooth! Love the car porn! so jealous....

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    Got the Steering Rack cleaned up, painted and lubed.  Attached it to the front support with the new Energy bushings.

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    Cleaned up and re-built both rear brake cylinders. Installed the rear brake assembly with new brake shoes and springs for the passenger side rear strut.

    Also got the chrome in last week.  They were pretty quick, taking just over two weeks.  I think I will keep them wrapped up until I am ready to install.

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    Got one of the front calipers rebuilt  (Before and After pic below, kind of),  Funny thing, when you order front brake and rear brake shoes, you get 2 sets in each box.  When you order a caliper rebuild kit, you only get a kit for one caliper.  What's up with that? So, need to order another caliper rebuild kit. I will order those along with the new brake flex hose lines.

    I put the short brake line that is near the backing plate on.  Those look pretty cool, so thought I would take a pic.

    Started cleaning up the fuel and brake lines.  Will send those out to plate shortly.  Taking the Brake drums and rotors to get turned tomorrow.  Hopefully the brake drums will be OK.  They have some deep grooves in them.

     

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    7 hours ago, Patcon said:

    What was the refinishing process for the front calipers?

    First I did an overall clean with paint thinner just to remove the grease and brake dust.  Then wire wheeled each caliper side to remove all of the rust.  Then high temp clear coat.  I was able to get most of the rust off with the wire wheel.   I had to use my drill with a small attachment to get into the crevices.

    The tricky thing (kind of dangerous really) is getting the pistons out to replace the internal seal.  The first thing I did is use some Kroil on the piston edge to help loosen it. After letting it sit for a day, I used  compressed air to force out the piston. On the slave side, there are two feed lines.  I put my finger over one hole and used compressor air in the other to force the piston out.  The important thing was to aim the piston at a 'backstop' because once it lets loose, it really flies.  It is very tempting to watch the process, but I pretty much just turn my head away and pulse the compressed air till I hear the loud 'pop'.  The master side is a bit more tricky.  I had to plug the main feed line and the bleed line hole with threaded bolts, then repeat the process.  After the pistons were out, I used lacquer thinner to clean off most of the gummy residue.  For the residue that would not come off with the lacquer thinner, I lightly cleaned the area with 1000 grit sand paper.

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    1 hour ago, motorman7 said:

    First I did an overall clean with paint thinner just to remove the grease and brake dust.  Then wire wheeled each caliper side to remove all of the rust.  Then high temp clear coat.  I was able to get most of the rust off with the wire wheel.   I had to use my drill with a small attachment to get into the crevices.

    The tricky thing (kind of dangerous really) is getting the pistons out to replace the internal seal.  The first thing I did is use some Kroil on the piston edge to help loosen it. After letting it sit for a day, I used  compressed air to force out the piston. On the slave side, there are two feed lines.  I put my finger over one hole and used compressor air in the other to force the piston out.  The important thing was to aim the piston at a 'backstop' because once it lets loose, it really flies.  It is very tempting to watch the process, but I pretty much just turn my head away and pulse the compressed air till I hear the loud 'pop'.  The master side is a bit more tricky.  I had to plug the main feed line and the bleed line hole with threaded bolts, then repeat the process.  After the pistons were out, I used lacquer thinner to clean off most of the gummy residue.  For the residue that would not come off with the lacquer thinner, I lightly cleaned the area with 1000 grit sand paper.

    Thanks

    What high temp clear did you use?

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    I love this thread, and am intending to keep the flat tops on my 1977-built, UK-model, 260Z when it is (eventually) restored. In respect of the front calipers, I have a pair of genuine NOS LH and RH ones, where the images below could be used as a reference for people completing stock restorations. They have a matt, grey, finish in stock form, with various green, blue, black and red paint spots daubed at various locations (see images). One of the calipers also has some white paint daubed on the front of the pad. The caliper bolts have black paint daubed on the bolt heads.

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    2 hours ago, jerz said:

    . In respect of the front calipers, I have a pair of genuine NOS LH and RH ones, where the images below could be used as a reference for people completing stock restorations. They have a matt, grey, finish in stock form, with various green, blue, black and red paint spots daubed at various locations (see images). One of the calipers also has some white paint daubed on the front of the pad. The caliper bolts have black paint daubed on the bolt heads.

    Interesting.  So looks like a matte grey paint on the steel.  Probably to prevent corrosion.  The matte grey kind of makes them look like aluminum.

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    Got the Rotors and drums turned at the machine shop.  Cleaned and re-packed hub bearings.  Assembled passenger side hub and rotor to strut. Also attached the small brake lines.  Started disassembly of the intake manifold parts and horn.  Took lots of pics of these items for later reference.  

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    Just got the clock in from Ron at  zclocks.com.  This baby looks brand new! New quartz mechanism has been installed.  Should be a lot more reliable than the old mech.

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                      I cleaned the outside of the rear drums and painted them with high temp ceramic aluminum paint.  They look pretty, but I am not sure that I like the finish.  They seem a bit too glossy.  I may change my mind and bead blast them and give them a high temp matte clear coat.

     

          And now what you all have been waiting for....I am venturing into the Flat Tops.  I have three sets of the flat top carbs with two of them being mostly complete.  The third set is missing the little diaphragm canisters, heat shields and linkage.  The set on the left has the '2' stamped on the body and I am assuming those are the original carbs.  They were also in the best condition.  My plan here is to disassemble the best two sets and get all of the yellow zinc parts out to plating.  I will keep the third, incomplete set, as a reference for when it's time to put everything back together. 

        I  have 4 rebuild kits.  I will look through those when I start to put everything back together.  Hopefully they are not too old and the rubber is all in good condition.

        I disassembled the rear carb and it looked to be in pretty nice shape.  The trick with getting the phillips head screws out is to put the screwdriver in the screw head and tap the top of the screwdriver firmly with a hammer.  That seems to loosen the screw and set the screwdriver deep in the head.  All of the screw came out nicely using this method.  I took lots of pics during disassembly to make sure this all goes back together correctly.  Pics are below.

        

     

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    Edited by motorman7

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    4 hours ago, motorman7 said:

    I cleaned the outside of the rear drums and painted them with high temp ceramic aluminum paint.  They look pretty, but I am not sure that I like the finish.  They seem a bit too glossy.  I may change my mind and bead blast them and give them a high temp matte clear coat.

    How about vapour blast, given they are made of alloy? Leaves a nice shot peened like finish and seals the surface to some extent against contamination plus it won't rub off like paint?

    It's what I used on my SU Carbs.

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    Quote

    The third set is missing the little diaphragm canisters

    Choke vacuum breakers

    If the goal is to make the choke circuit functional, those diaphragms are often damaged and will not hold a vacuum--you should check them soon using a hand vacuum pump and start looking for replacements that will hold vacuum.

    It took me several sets to acquire one set of good diaphragms. Another fitzy spot is the linkage on the side of each of the carbs that actuates the choke vacuum breaker---a small u-shaped bent rod that connects the vacuum breakers to the choke plate shaft that is held by small cotter pins and has very small washers and springs as part of the assembly.

    Most flat tops are missing these parts as previous owners and/ or mechanics defeated the choke circuit entirely by removing them from the carbs. There are specific adjustments that must be made to enable the choke circuit to function correctly and it is a bit of a pain to get set.

    1973 Flat Top Carb Info from TSB.pdf 

    or better yet

    1973 240z 1974 260z fuel system modifications.pdf

    Once set on a well maintained engine the choke circuit shouldn't need much more attention mechanically. 

    You were familiar with the flat tops already from your previously owned 73 240Z, but these publications will provide some additional critical knowledge as to their adjustment.

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    7 hours ago, motorman7 said:

    And now what you all have been waiting for....I am venturing into the Flat Tops.

    Yes!  Never had a chance to see how a flat top is put together, kind of a rare sight as most were pitched years ago.

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    For me it is the sheer number of springs, washers, metal bits and small pieces that proves to be so daunting as compared to the SIMPLE earlier SU's. It is no wonder to me why they have been given such a dower reputation over the years.

    Most of us , including me, are inherently somewhat lazy when it comes to complex assemblies---we just want it to work and be spared of the anguish of learning something new to make that happen. :cry:

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