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Racing Question: How does one deal with fuel delivery and high banked, high speed curves like Fuji, Monza, & Daytona?

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    I read that Brock suffered car failures at the 1969 ARRC at Daytona due to fuel delivery.

    I noticed that in 1970 he seemed to dead head fuel to each weber with an individual fpr near each carb.

    1970 BRE FPR Carb Feed.jpg

     

    69 arrc.jpg
    Dan Parkinson (15) & Brian Fuerstenau (4)

    Is the high bank issue related to the fuel pump having to work harder to pull/push fuel up to the engine under the extra G forces caused by the turn (causing a lean feed to all carbs)?

    Is the float also part of the issue where it, the needle, and the fuel would both be pulled towards the bottom of the bowl and thus causing a higher fuel level?

    Or would it simply be the fact the cars would run  WOT on the straights and continue at or near WOT in the turns thus demanding more fuel for a longer period of WOT time and possibly emptying the fuel bowls by consuming more than the stock design could supply?

     

     

     

    Edited by 240260280

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    My race car has a surge tank in each of the rear corners of the fuel cell. There are ball checks that allow the fuel to fill the surge tanks, then a each has its own fuel pump to move the fuel to a T, then a single line to the engine bay. There are check valves inline so if one runs low (as in cornering) the other won't pump fuel to it, but rather to the engine.

     

    Works great, never starves for fuel under any conditions.

     

    Well, except if one of the fuel pumps dies.

     

    Then the engine runs lean and pistons melt.

    • Like 1

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    As Mr. Hendrix asked "are you experienced"

    I know I am.

    In my experience they don't so much as melt but rather are consumed (read eaten) by an angry beast looking for fuel. Metal can serve as a fuel for just a limited amount of time before really bad things happen.

    I have twin pumps that are plumbed to separate duckbill pickups in the left and right corners of the fuel cell which in turn connect to the filter and then to the engine bay (second filter). If one pump fails, the other will get me through unless I lose it on a very banked NASCAR track (an unlikely event).

    Holley makes a flat screen pillow pickup that covers most of the bottom of a cell. When it's time to replace the foam/bladder I might go in that direction.

    Edited by gnosez
    • Like 1

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    17-c.JPG

    This is how they did it back in the day...… They ran a pickup from the corner out of the cell to a fuel pump, plumbed back towards the cell thru an added bulkhead fitting in the quick fill plate and into the canister you can see, in the cell.  Main pickup is out of the bottom of the canister and out thru duel pumps and a filter.

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