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The Solution for NLA Parts!


Marty Rogan

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I'm sold. Hell, that's pocket change, I'll take 2. In about 10 years.......

Does Will know about this one??

I don't know. He was the first one that popped into my head when I saw it. I was going to add it to the throttle control knob thread, but I could not find it. I figured it could get more general exposure this way too.

Hell, if we can get donations to buy a new server, maybe we should all chip in and buy one of these. And the best part is it is made in the USA, so we would be supporting our economy too.

That 3-D "printer" is incredible. It even replicates moving parts.

Marty

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The whole set-up is fantastic! Copies of hard to find or NLA parts made while you wait.

Seems we need to find a company that has this set-up and would let us send them parts to be duplicated. Production could then be done as needed.

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If you have an original good enough to use to copy (and turn into plastic) to make a mold from - why not make the cast from the original. It seems a bit like making a copy from a cassette tape (or Xeroxing a Xerox) - you are copying the errors and loss of detail from each subsequent copy (aren't you?).

Devil's advocate.

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If you have an original good enough to use to copy (and turn into plastic) to make a mold from - why not make the cast from the original. It seems a bit like making a copy from a cassette tape (or Xeroxing a Xerox) - you are copying the errors and loss of detail from each subsequent copy (aren't you?).Devil's advocate.
I'm sure that since it's computer based you can correct flaws in the original. Let's say the original is broken, like in the case of Jay Leno's part, I'm sure the machine scans it and compiles the info, breaks, flaws and all. Those can be corrected by the software before the model is produced. And then you wouldn't be making a cast from a flawed part. Edited by sblake01
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I'm sold. Hell, that's pocket change, I'll take 2. In about 10 years.......

Does Will know about this one??

Yup,

I have looked at the Next Engine scanner for several years.

Another member has one and was going to scan a few parts for me, and that never has happened, so after a few attempts at communication, I decided that I just needed to go it on my own-so I bought one.

It does require additional software to make it usable and cost effective, I have been researching the proper software to make the scans usable, and to drive my CNC mill/drill/lathe in its native tongue. I don't have a solidwerks budget-in terms of time or money, so I have to find a less expensive answer-and I believe I have. It will be delivered after I get back from Amelia,

I don't have the 3d printer, but both SCAD and Gulfstream do, and the gentleman who owns the restoration shop handling Larrys car is connected with both!

Simple reproductions are better handled with comparatively simple molding techniques. I expect to use the scanner to produce wax positives for lost wax castings.

Will

I am tired of telling you guys what is coming, and never seeming to finish. My intent was to show you with a video, and some finished parts...after Larrys car is done.

Will

Edited by hls30.com
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wow!!! i know what im buying with my tax return!!!:eek:

That better be one hell of a big tax return! The scanner is 3K and the printer is 30K!!!! You'd have to make a lot of parts to get your loot back.

Edited by Weasel73240Z
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It's like a CNC machine with the scanner piece built in.

I don't know why you wouldn't make that part out of a billet, but perhaps for authenticity or something...

Actually they're two separate systems. And the 3-D printers have the ability to form complex, moving, internal pieces which you can't do from a block of billet. The machine works like a 3 dimensional inkjet printer and like they said can use dissolvable materials in place of the plastic to create internal parts.

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If you want a part you can actually use instead of just look at then the 3D printer isn't too useful. Using the output of the printer to create molds so you can cast parts in higher strength materials is about as good as it gets. There are some that print parts in sintered metal that can baked into fairly strong parts but it's still not a substitute for the original material if you are trying to duplicate an existing metal part. They are getting better every day but still a long way from spitting out exact duplicates as far as strength is concerned.

Steve

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If you want a part you can actually use instead of just look at then the 3D printer isn't too useful.They are getting better every day but still a long way from spitting out exact duplicates as far as strength is concerned.

You're right. The end result is a part which is composed of very small orbs or strings (depending on the printer) of plastic (the plastic is usually ABS). This means they're typically not very strong and are best used in forming a mold to cast new pieces.

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That is ridiculously cool. I'm amazed at both the price and size of the scanner, and incredibly amazed that the "printer" can out complex moving parts like that working steam engine replica and what appeared to be a pre-assembled diff.

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The scanner is cool! ... allows you to work with a cnc machine much easier.

The printer might be more to impress people with vast amounts of money and the willingness to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a single part (read: Jay Leno).

:)

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Couldn't you just take the configuration of the old part, i.e. dimensions, etc., that are generated by the scanner into the computer program and go directly to the cnc machine process without having to make a model on the 'printer'?

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The NextEngine Scanner is a nice portable solution. I found it couldn't capture the detail needed for a couple of projects I've done. I would suggest these guys if you're serious about scanning and need finer resolution or even IGES data of that scan:

http://www.directdimensions.com/

I've had great success with them - their expertise in the field is great.

For these types of parts, printing quickcast is the way to go - that is, if you intend to go down the road of investment casting. Or make rubber molds from straight-up 3D printed parts (preferably Objet or SLA).

BTW - if anyone has any SolidWorks needs, feel free to PM me. It's what I do for a living (legally own a license, Design Consultant, Certified SolidWorks Professional, teach SolidWorks at a couple of local design colleges, yada yada).

Cheers,

Colin

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The printer might be more to impress people with vast amounts of money and the willingness to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a single part (read: Jay Leno).

:)

Just so we don't assign somewhat misleading uses and motives to the equipment itself - the fact that one could use it for the auto hobby, doesn't mean it was intended for the rich and famous. Nor should we expect it to stay as expensive in the future.

Building design and engineering prototypes has always been a very useful and in many cases necessary process. One that has always been time consuming in both actual work hours and more importantly total project schedule...

Being able to scan existing components, to rapidly build a 3D data base that can be modified to reflect design changes, or altered into completely new products can save a lot of time and money in the product development cycles. It can also cut the time needed for all manor of engineering analysis model builds, to feed simulations etc etc.

Likewise "printing" a prototype part in hours presents the potential to save hundreds of thousands of dollars in prototype build costs, and reduce schedules from weeks to hours. Building them in plastic, on the spot in the engineers office, and providing the ability to support many iterative changes/improvements etc - is amazingly cost effective.

This "stuff" didn't start out being equipment for Jay's Garage... it's just that with the constant advancement of the technology - it has now made it inexpensive enough to find thousands of other uses in every day life.

Compared to the 50's and 60's - most of us have super computers sitting on our desks today..

FWIW,

Carl B.

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This "stuff" didn't start out being equipment for Jay's Garage... Carl B.

Oh for sure, I know that, obviously. Where I was going with my comment was that for a "Solution to NLA Parts" ... and the examples that Jay was frothing at the mouth about, the printer isn't as useful as the scanner. If you're making prototypes or test fitting one-offs, then the printer would be invaluable.

Gotta love this one, too.... http://www.engadget.com/2007/05/10/diy-3d-printer-utilizes-hot-air-sugar-to-craft-random-objects/

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Ok guys I found it!!!! Forget the $3000.00 3D scanner. How about $30.00 for one? Now put this with candy fab and we got a fun toy.

<embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://revision3.com/player-v1940" allowfullscreen="true" width="555" height="312" />

Edited by carguyinok
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