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Parts Wanted: 280z Stub Axle and Companion Flange


ckurtz2

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280z Stub Axle and Companion Flange


Hey guys,

       I could really use some community help on this one. I need a stub axle and companion flange, because mine unfortunately is bent and is causing a pretty mean vibration while driving. I think I bent it when installing new bearings. It is the right side on a 1977 Datsun 280z coupe. 

Anyways I am on a tight budget so if anyone has some extras lying around I'd be happy to pay something for it.


  • Advertiser
    ckurtz2
  • Date
    09/06/2022
  • Price
  • Category
  • Year
    1977
  • Model
    280z

 

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If you don't mind sharing, I'm curious at what speed the vibration occurs? I chased a MAJOR high speed vibration (sounded and felt like 500 lb. bee trapped in the car)  in my 240 that started at around 80 mph. I changed the half shaft u-joints first. Vibration was the same. New prop shaft u joints cured the vibration. The prop shaft spins 3-4 times faster that the half shafts and is more prone to vibration.

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4 hours ago, Mark Maras said:

If you don't mind sharing, I'm curious at what speed the vibration occurs? I chased a MAJOR high speed vibration (sounded and felt like 500 lb. bee trapped in the car)  in my 240 that started at around 80 mph. I changed the half shaft u-joints first. Vibration was the same. New prop shaft u joints cured the vibration. The prop shaft spins 3-4 times faster that the half shafts and is more prone to vibration.

Hey Mark,

       I rebuilt the entire drivetrain and suspension components about a year ago. Just finally got the car back on the road. Anways, every single ujoint is brand new and solid. I checked the half shafts. I am going to pull the driveshaft and take it back to the shop it was rebuilt at to make sure it was properly balanced and rebuilt, I remember thinking one of the new ujoints was iffy.

       Anyways, The rebuilt stub Axle went smoothly into the car when I installed it. However, when I istalled the companion flange I had to impact the nut on to tighten it. When I did this the stub axle seated proper, but the companion flange would bend up. Went through two companion flanges and decided screw it cause I was so pissed off at the time. Anyways I am pretty confident the stub axle is bent due to this reason. I guess somehow I bent it on the press? Or the PO bent it and I didn't know.

       Vibration happens anywhere from 30mph all the way to 100+. I feel it is on a harmonic cycle, because it will disappear slightly at certain speeds under acceleration, but once I decelerate I am doomed. The vibration is really bad though. So I am assuming its either that most likely bent axle, or prop shaft like you mentioned. Lets hope its the latter, but I probably should fix the stub axle anyways.

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Looks like I will pull the shaft and see what happens with the shop. I pray it is this, however I put the car in neutral at about 80 and let the car coast and it still vibrated like hell so that's what has been steering me off that conclusion. Also yes, wheels were balanced, car aligned etc.

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When all other suggestions checked out and issue still exist, and if $20 is affordable, I would rebalance them again.  Mine tires were couple of thousand miles.  I swapped the tires to the mag wheels.  Balanced at the same shop and immediately exhibited the vibration.  Rotated the tires didn’t help.  Took to Costco to rebalance again as it was the cheapest option instead of getting new set of tires or drive shaft… fortunately it cured the vibration.  Hope you’re lucky too 

Edited by 240zadmire
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45 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

Did you post about this before?  Seems familiar.  A dial indicator, or even a stick on a brick, might tell you something.  Set it up and spin the various items in question.

It is possible, but I don't think so. I am considering making a thread for it though, because I want to know how it would even bend in the first place or if something else is causing the companion flange to twist and bend. So bad that I have to use a big bearing puller and a breaker bar to pull it back off the splines. I just don't understand it. The driver side one works perfect and assembled perfect.

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1 hour ago, ckurtz2 said:

pull it back off the splines

Off the splines or out of the hole?  I think that the outer bearing race is an interference fit (could be wrong).  Might be that the strut casting has a problem.

image.png

image.png

 

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Yes. So the companion flange female splines fit over the male splines just a little bit. But then I have to impact on the companion flange the rest of the way. After the companion flange is completely on I can notice it is all out of true. As when I spin the whole thing the companion flange looks all bent and no longer circular. In fact it actually made contact with the strut and I have to bend it a little back. I’m just thinking that because of this rhe axle must be bent at the area where the splines are. As the companion flange probably bends to fit the bent shaft. I hope this makes sense. I have no proof but this is my theory. The strut and races looked good before I put the stub axle in. I doubt they got messed up. But I did have the axle on a 80,000lb press. Probs messed it up there when putting on bearings or wheels studs

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Probably easier to tell if the axle and flange are off the car.

I did a quick Google and these popped up.  You can see that the guy is sliding the flange on and off the axle by hand.  Has to be for the pictures.

Type "Datsun 280z 27 Spline Stub Axles W/Companion Flange " in to eBay and they should pop up.  $350 for the set.  (eBay tags so much stuff on to their web page links that I'm afraid to share the link.  Who knows what all of that extra stuff means).

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Edited by Zed Head
-y
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I'll definetly shoot a PM his way.

Ok so, I finally got a buddy in the passenger seat with a speedometer app on his phone (mine no work haha). Anyways the official symptoms are. The shaking is super bad at around 45-65mph. At the lower end at around the 40-45 the steering wheel noticeably shakes, and then that fades away at about 65mph. However at 65 the entire car is shaking really bad, but the duration of the vibrations is much faster instead of thump thump thump. The car is pretty much smoothed out entirely at around 79-81mph and it feels much closer to normal, however its slightly still there. It then gets worse as I go faster to about 100. To sketchy for me to try further, and found no reason to.  Now for the fun part, I had an extra set of hands so I had him feel around the car where the vibration was the worst without telling him which side had the boofed stub axle. Well he identified the strut tower at the passenger rear as the worst, which essentially confirms that my vibration's epicenter is from the wheel well where the bad axle is. So I think I am going to skip pulling the driveshaft and focus on this as the priority.

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From your description it is confusing about what is ‘bent’. Is this something you see? Can you post a picture of it?

When not assembled, off the car, slide the companion flange  onto the shaft. It should slide on all the way without resistance.

The parts that fit inside the bearings is where there is an interference fit. 

Using anti seize on the splined portion is a good idea on assembly. It will aid disassembly later on.

 

 

Finding a vibration can be difficult. As Mark mentioned, different parts of the drivetrain rotate at different speeds, and understanding this can help locate the source of the vibrations.

You mentioned vibrations in the steering wheel. That suggests the vibrations are coming from the front of the car, not the rear.

If you feel the vibrations in the seat, that suggests the vibrations are coming from the rear of the car.

If you suspect the companion flange is bent, use a dial indicator and check for runout. It is an easy check, and the FSM should have a spec for it.

Also check the runout on your wheels, halfshafts, driveshaft, differential pinion and output flanges.

Be sure to closely examine the tires too, looking for damage, shifted belts or unusual bumps in the tread. 
 

Be sure the tires are properly inflated.

 

 

 

 

 

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Your description sounds more like the bearing is not seating properly in the strut casting.  The bearing is cokced.  Or the "distance piece" is distorted which also would cause a cokced bearing.  There are several surfaces you can examine and measure to find out what's not right.  You'll have to take it apart though.

When those 5 parts clamp together they basically form a solid tube though the hub.  The two inner bearing races and the distance piece are the tube, and the flanges are the clamping surfaces.  The outer races get pulled along by the balls and inner race.

image.png

 

Edited by Zed Head
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@Racer X I think the vibrations are so bad that it is affecting the front wheels, but I don't think it is truly stemming from the front. Anyways while its on stands for peace of mind I am going to retorque the front axles and make sure it isn't too loose or too tight. Quick and easy thing to do. How exactly do I check runout with the dial indicator, and where do I get one? 

     @Zed Head If the stub axle had properly seated bearings, and it fit into the strut casing fine, how would it not be seating? I never really felt much resistance until I tried to seat the companion flange. Anyways when I get the companion flange off is there a way to check for this? If I am going to do this (I really really really hated touching the stub axles the first time) I want to know exactly what I need to check for. If there is anyway I just have to adjust some stuff and replace the companion flange I'd be so happy to save some $. Is there anyway I can just leave the grease in the hub instead of having to remove it?

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By your description you think that one of the flanges has excessive runout.  You said that you think something bent when installing new bearings.  The only force that could put a side load on the shaft or the flanges is the nut and washer pressing on the inner flange, pulling the parts together.  The only thing resisting the force is the bearing.  If you put the nut on when the parts are out of the casting it should spin right on.

I'm just proposing ideas about what would cause a bend of any of those parts.

Here's other thoughts though - the half-shaft is not properly seated on the centering ring.  Or the half-shaft itself is bent or binding.  Or the differential is damaged.  There are a lot of moving parts back there.

Can't really tell because all you have are impressions from driving.  Sometimes it helps to just lift the car, throw a cushion under it, crawl under there, and take a good look at things as you spin them.  Grab things and shake them, see if anything is loose.

 

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14 minutes ago, Zed Head said:

 Sometimes it helps to just lift the car, throw a cushion under it, crawl under there, and take a good look at things as you spin them.  Grab things and shake them, see if anything is loose.

 

Yup:) Going to attack it on Sunday. As you know I just got the car rolling after two years of absolute peril, so putting it back on stands for what will likely be an extended period of time hurts the soul.

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