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Owwwww....yea, you need a frame rail.  My previous advice.

Noticing the picture of the exhaust pipes with the 'Z' medallion.  I always thought that that collector style was exclusive to the auto trans cars.  You see how one pipe is welded into the other - no collector fitting?  Interesting.

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My advice for this car would be to find a good frame rail cut from a donor car. You could use a reproduction rail but I think a good OEM cut would make a better repair and if done properly would be nearly invisible. This car is worth the effort

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Years ago I got my rear quarters from a 73 at Hidden Valley Auto parts in Maricopa. I wonder if they still have the rest of the shell there. It would be worth a phone call.

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I don't necessarily agree that you need a body shell, but if you find something appropriate, why not!  Again, be careful with your alignment.

So what you basically have is an early version of the early HLS30 builds everyone refers to as "series one" and you are going to find some very unique parts throughout the car.  This site is going to be a treasure of information.  I have much of my stuff documented.  You'll find information about the European imports as well as what was made in Japan and how the cars differed from the export models.

Great car, more pictures!

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I never implied that he needs a shell, just a possible source for a rail.

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4 hours ago, 240260280 said:

Here are pics of the nearest VINs I have to yours: 672

 

air vent entry.jpeg

brake.jpeg

console.jpeg

deck.jpeg

emblem.jpeg

engine.jpeg

gas filler.jpeg

glass.jpeg

hood.jpeg

inner fender.jpeg

seat.jpeg

vin.jpeg

Thank you for posting this. Great pictures. What's the groups opinion? Keep it as a survivor and fix the frame rail. Or full restoration? 

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8 hours ago, 240260280 said:

Do you want to keep it?  If so, pick away at the clean-up and make repairs using early Z parts.

If not, flip it now for a great reward.

 

My heart tells me to keep it. If I do keep it are you suggesting keep the car as a survivor and avoid the frame off restoration? My pocket book tells me that this Z could fetch a pretty penny on BAT but I just don't see myself letting it go. 

Edited by cmillermorris

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Looks like it only needs the new rails on the right side ( engine Bay and floor) and some battery tray area new sheet metal.

But don't be fooled. There Will be a lot of work on the car. Everything is 50 years old..

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So I found a 260Z donor car. Will that work? I did some research online and I am getting some conflicting reports. One article I read said Nissan stiffened the car in 74 by extending the frame rails, any truth to this?

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I already went down the road with a 260 donor for a 240....it will ruin the value of your car to anyone that’s a collector down the road. Too much is different on the front end. Wait for the right car. 

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Please take more photos for us.  It is rare to see an early Z that has been unmolested.  These photos help us greatly in the accuracy of our restorations so they are very much appreciated ?

More close-ups in the engine compartment, the fire wall area, the area between the bumper and the radiator, up under the dash, etc... THANKS!

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On 8/28/2020 at 7:20 PM, cmillermorris said:

My heart tells me to keep it. If I do keep it are you suggesting keep the car as a survivor and avoid the frame off restoration? My pocket book tells me that this Z could fetch a pretty penny on BAT but I just don't see myself letting it go. 

Yes it wouldn't be too hard to clean it up, fix the rails and make some money on this car but the I think the rewards of owning and driving your Z will be greater and if you do decide to sell sometime in the future the car will only be worth more.

Your Z would be perfect for a survivor treatment but I would be very careful with how hard you drive the car until the rails are repaired.  That area just behind the T/C rod mount is a crucial to the structure of the car and although that area appears to be the only major rust you can be assured that there is more waiting for you.

The structure of the car needs a full restoration or at least a through cleaning and inspection, everything above the floor pans can stay original if you choose to go that way.

Finding original rails from an early car is ideal but there is a company in Florida that is making excellent reproductions that might be worth looking at, https://kfvintagejdm.com/product-category/datsun/

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3 hours ago, 240260280 said:

Please take more photos for us.  It is rare to see an early Z that has been unmolested.  These photos help us greatly in the accuracy of our restorations so they are very much appreciated ?

More close-ups in the engine compartment, the fire wall area, the area between the bumper and the radiator, up under the dash, etc... THANKS!

I will try to get some more pictures for everyone this week. I think I might have located a 70 240Z donor car, and I have never driven this car, and don't plan on it until the rust/frame rail have been addressed. 

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