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DC871F

73 240z restoration 904 White

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I really like this one, I used it a lot when I was working on my hatch striker panel. 
 

https://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/grinders-sanders/portable-belt-sanders/53-amp-12-in-heavy-duty-bandfile-belt-sander-62863.html

Make sure to grab some good belts, I’m not sure about the quality difference between brands, some people say it makes a difference.

If you have some spare coupons of scrap metal, try adjusting the wire speed to be faster, you might be able to get the weld to be flatter. (too fast and it’s going to blow through)

Check this guy out: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1AiDqIHP5Po

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I have an assortment of die grinders with different bits. a cut off wheel can help knock welds down. 1" roloks work good but wear out fast. I also have an assortment of rasp bits for die grinders that work good too

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13 hours ago, heyitsrama said:

I really like this one, I used it a lot when I was working on my hatch striker panel. 
 

https://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/grinders-sanders/portable-belt-sanders/53-amp-12-in-heavy-duty-bandfile-belt-sander-62863.html

Make sure to grab some good belts, I’m not sure about the quality difference between brands, some people say it makes a difference.

If you have some spare coupons of scrap metal, try adjusting the wire speed to be faster, you might be able to get the weld to be flatter. (too fast and it’s going to blow through)

Check this guy out: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1AiDqIHP5Po

I just learned a bunch from that video, thank you!

I just returned a HF angle grinder, it lasted 3 days, got a DeWalt and its pretty nice. With that said, I'm now suspect of some HF tools, which I know is no surprise for a lot of HF stuff.  Are you getting a lot of use from that band file? THeres a pnuematic one here at the local tool supply for $120, not sure I'm going for that.

Thanks.

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Just a couple small items. Got rid of most the tar board from the tunnel, assessed the seat rail mounts and decided to go with new rail mounts from KlassicFab. I'm going to cut the floors soon, install ZF  floor pans and rails.

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Edited by DC871F

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I really liked the ability of the finger (band) file in tight hard to reach sections, I have mixed variety of power tools, I pick up the HF 4.5" grinder more than the Makita one that I have, and I've yet to break a tool. One thing has changed with HF tools is their brushes are no longer replaceable, that i think will move me out to another brand. I've replaced the brushes several times in both the disk cutter and the metal chop saw.

Dewalt is nice, I started using Milwaukee m18 and m12 tools, id like to keep the battery system the same (Milwaukee tools can adapt dewalt batteries to their body w/ and adapter)

$120 seems like a lot for a band file ( id think that money would be nicely spent on another grinder so you dont have to change the wheels)

Perhaps a garage sale might be a good spot to find a discounted one. Because your working with the car in the garage and have clearance under the car, i think you could get away with out having one.

Its nice that someone makes the seat rail mounts, I had make the front one, it was pretty complex.

Is the plan to remove the spotwelds? Lisle 51900 Spot Weld Chisel is a nice beater, better than dads old craftsman flat. ?

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8 hours ago, heyitsrama said:

I really liked the ability of the finger (band) file in tight hard to reach sections, I have mixed variety of power tools, I pick up the HF 4.5" grinder more than the Makita one that I have, and I've yet to break a tool. One thing has changed with HF tools is their brushes are no longer replaceable, that i think will move me out to another brand. I've replaced the brushes several times in both the disk cutter and the metal chop saw.

 
 
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Dewalt is nice, I started using Milwaukee m18 and m12 tools, id like to keep the battery system the same (Milwaukee tools can adapt dewalt batteries to their body w/ and adapter)

 

 

$120 seems like a lot for a band file ( id think that money would be nicely spent on another grinder so you dont have to change the wheels)

Perhaps a garage sale might be a good spot to find a discounted one. Because your working with the car in the garage and have clearance under the car, i think you could get away with out having one.

Its nice that someone makes the seat rail mounts, I had make the front one, it was pretty complex.

Is the plan to remove the spotwelds? Lisle 51900 Spot Weld Chisel is a nice beater, better than dads old craftsman flat. ?

I'm replacing both floor pans, so I'm going to cut them out with the floors.

I like that spot weld chisel, never seen that before. If I can learn something everyday, I deem that a success.

I'm going to pick up a band file probably today. I have a lot to learn. I've been looking at my 240 for almost 2 years sitting on the rotisserie after disassembly not sure wear to start. My wife told me to order rails and pans for my birthday and I went head first. It was a steep climb up the hill on the tools I was lacking.

Edited by DC871F

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I usually get in that spot too, just staring at the car not knowing where to go. I even bought a whole other chassis and started working on that because it did not need AS much repair. (Probably was a good idea learned a lot)

60% of the time I just grab a tool and start doing something, and it gets the creativity flowing. 

How’s the hatch striker panel? the one above the tail lights. 

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Progress today. Passenger floor removed, still a little left. Also received Klassicfab seat mounts.

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Rear floor where it attaches to the frame before it makes the upturn is really clean. My plan is to use this to plug weld my ZF floors to.

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Where pans meet against sills are alsovery clean, so far I'm lucking out. Drill the spot welds and attach new ones. Never done this before, hopefully they go it clean.

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Frame rail just forward of the toe board is swiss chees. I have forward rails I got from Charlie, but do not have the parts that weld up to tension rod mount. A little scratch building perhaps.

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Inboard side on the tunnel is clean except one piece thatr goes up about 2 inches from the upturn. Going to patch that in when the floors are installed.

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Edited by DC871F

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I have a question for you guys who have done frame rail work before.

I am replacing my floor pans, and pan rails, I also need to replace the bottom part of the rails that mounts in just aft of the tension rod mount. I'm also replacing the front frame rails as well. I will be doing this obviously one side at a time.

Here is the question. Is there a specific method to this? Meaning, should I put the pans in, then replace the rear part of the frame rails aft of the tension rod mount first, then do the front rails?

Is there anytime where you risk bending the front geometry of the car if you just remove all of this at once and start replacing? No where have I seen on any build threads where any added bracing was welded in to prevent warping the front. of the car.

Thanks.

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How bad are your front frame rails? Unless they're really damaged, I'd leave them alone, or just fix them in spots. It's a large job. If they're only rotted in the usual spots, then I'd just repair those spots.

When removing major structural components of the car, like the engine bay rails, or the rockers, it's generally a good idea to add bracing to keep things in place. 

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10 hours ago, rturbo 930 said:

How bad are your front frame rails? Unless they're really damaged, I'd leave them alone, or just fix them in spots. It's a large job. If they're only rotted in the usual spots, then I'd just repair those spots.

When removing major structural components of the car, like the engine bay rails, or the rockers, it's generally a good idea to add bracing to keep things in place. 

They are mostly intact as far as I can tell from the outside, but looking in where I cut off the pan rail forward its very crunchy in there when I shine the light. If I just cut and paste sections but miss rust, I'm concerned that the restoration on this magnitude will be in vain if I have to go back in  later on. I'll evaluate when I can get a bigger picture inside the rails.

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Look in wheees build thread. He did all of that. the results seem excellent

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New edition to the shop, plus some fire wall and battery tray area cutting and welding. New Kobalt compressor.

This is my first real attempt as being a fabricator, and I have to say it kind of man handled me, but I hope my grinding skills can overcome.20201015_165124.jpg

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Frame rail has rust just right in this area, I plan on cutting a patch for it. Its all clean from the part I cut out forward, thank God. The other side still to be determined, its a little more crunchy.

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Edited by DC871F

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That battery area can be tricky for sure but you're going about it in the right way, have you checked the fresh air chimney just north of where you are working?  It is an area that gathers leaves and is very prone to rust.

I like that Lisle spot weld chisel, looks like you would get a cleaner cut but it's hard to beat an air hammer chisel for speed with multiple spot welds.

 

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5 hours ago, grannyknot said:

That battery area can be tricky for sure but you're going about it in the right way, have you checked the fresh air chimney just north of where you are working?  It is an area that gathers leaves and is very prone to rust.

I like that Lisle spot weld chisel, looks like you would get a cleaner cut but it's hard to beat an air hammer chisel for speed with multiple spot welds.

 

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I have one of these. I made a new chimney and there are several pin holes on the shelf area that will need to be fixed. I plan on using a spot media blaster inside the cowl area to clean it all up and the make patch panels.

 

Along the firewall it looks like a pinch weld, just forward of the chimney. Plenty of rust on that seem, I'm contemplating cutting out the vertical area there on the firewall and patching, right where the negative battery terminal bolts on a welded nut. I'm not sure what the best way to correct this will be. Any thoughts?

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Edited by DC871F

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I tried to do most of my repairs through the shelf panel that the chimney attaches to, going in from the top entails a crazy amount of spotwelds to remove.  That seam on the firewall although it has easy access is a challenge because it is so visible, I have never had to repair that area so I'm not sure of the best way to tackle it.

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Are you welding your patch panels in with little 1" long segments of weld?

If you are, I have found that's too much heat. When I weld in panels, I make a small bead weld 1/8" to 3/16s diameter. Spaced about every 1" to 1 1/2". Let them cool, then add more. Keep adding beads until it's seamed up. Then grind and fill any pin holes that show up with more beads

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16 minutes ago, Patcon said:

Are you welding your patch panels in with little 1" long segments of weld?

If you are, I have found that's too much heat. When I weld in panels, I make a small bead weld 1/8" to 3/16s diameter. Spaced about every 1" to 1 1/2". Let them cool, then add more. Keep adding beads until it's seamed up. Then grind and fill any pin holes that show up with more beads

Yes. I tack weld the panel in, then start to fill in with a bunch of tack welds. But here is a problem I am having, and keep in mind I am no welder, this is all OJT after practicing on coupons. I am having issue with penetration, but if I up the current I start blowing holes. The first pic is the backside of the piece I grinded smooth. It looks good from the outside but on rear I cant get the welds to close up, too cold I'm guessing.

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Back side.

Edited by DC871F

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I am not a pro welder and sometimes I struggle but I don't really judge my welds by the back side. For starters your seam of buttons looks pretty good. I have found though if the gap is too tight my welds aren't as good. I want a skinny 1/16 or so to bridge, not butted up tight.

Also your test piece has a lot of splatter. Are you running shield gas? are you close enough? Is thee flow high enough? Did you clean the test piece first?

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6 minutes ago, Patcon said:

I am not a pro welder and sometimes I struggle but I don't really judge my welds by the back side. For starters your seam of buttons looks pretty good. I have found though if the gap is too tight my welds aren't as good. I want a skinny 1/16 or so to bridge, not butted up tight.

Also your test piece has a lot of splatter. Are you running shield gas? are you close enough? Is thee flow high enough? Did you clean the test piece first?

The splatter only happened on the test piece. Running 75/25 at about 20-25psi in a closed shop, and it was clean. 

The firewall section I welded in I was able to come at it on both sides, so its in there good. I have my air hose close by to cool things off quickly, so it in there nice and flat.

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I have found that cooling with an air hose will cause excess shrinkage and warping.

It is a technique used by body men to remove dents and oil canning..

Don't get me wrong, I use to do it but I ruined several panels this way and simply let them air cool now. Sometimes I dolly them along the way to prevent the weld bead from warping the panel

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7 minutes ago, Patcon said:

I have found that cooling with an air hose will cause excess shrinkage and warping.

It is a technique used by body men to remove dents and oil canning..

Don't get me wrong, I use to do it but I ruined several panels this way and simply let them air cool now. Sometimes I dolly them along the way to prevent the weld bead from warping the panel

Oh wow, good to know.

I have done about 7-8 small patches so far, and all of them have ground out real nice. The firewall piece was the biggest to date. I sat and looked at for a long time before going after it. It wasnt too bad since the passenger floor pan is removed and I can get pretty good access to it.

Edited by DC871F

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I think the bigger the panel and the longer the seam the more chance for problems. Small patches are a great way to learn because they are reasonably forgiving

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2 minutes ago, Patcon said:

I think the bigger the panel and the longer the seam the more chance for problems. Small patches are a great way to learn because they are reasonably forgiving

Yeah, especially on the upper rocker where the escusion plate will be covering them as well. Mama didnt raise no dummy.

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A few improvements to the shop.

Rigged up a transmission after cooler for my new Kobalt compressor, reduces air going into the holding tank to room temperature. It drastically keeps water out of the air lines. I also made up a 3/4" copper pipe system to catch any moisture that comes out of the tank before going to my water filter and regulator. This is just a preliminary set up before I put in a 5 stage filter system for painting.

Also am trying out this small blaster from HF. The cowl area on the Z has plenty of surface rust and a few pitted hole in it. I need to weld patch panels in and I cant really figure outa way to get in there and clean it out. I'm using glass media. 

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